Minimalissimo


Search results for “Apple”

This collection of simple leather sleeves for Apple devices has been created by the Dutch company Mujjo. All pieces are simple, slim and at the same time provide enough room to carry your iThing plus a few extras. The iPhone and iPad cases are folded from a single piece of leather in such a way that there is an integrated pocket for your papers, cards, earphones and other essentials. The Macbook sleeves feature felt for extra padding. They have a compartment inside to fit your stuff. Here is how designers explain their vision: We obsessively try to keep it as simple as possible, while trying to make each part as good as possible, every stitch, every button, they have all been intensively thought out. While it’s not easy to keep things simple, it does pay off to create a product that is perfect in a sense of simplicity to that extent that you cannot leave anything away without compromising it’s intention. I love the functionality of these pieces. While slimming the lines, designers did not strip away the comfort. I would appreciate more colors though.


Noisli — a project by Italian multidisciplinary designer Stefano Merlo — is an ambient high-quality sound and colour generator for working and relaxing. The sounds are designed to help you focus while working, relieve anxiety or just to relax. You may already be familiar with the web version, but today Noisli release their beautiful new iOS app for both iPad and iPhone. The app features various sounds including, rain, thunderstorm, bonfire, forest, train and seaside — all of which can be toggled and layered with varying emphasis, to produce your ideal sound combination. The app also features a built-in timer function, which can be used during work, creativity sessions or to simply fall asleep. The Noisli app lets you play all of the sounds offline and therefore you can enjoy its features and benefits while travelling, commuting or any other activity with no need for an internet connection. Since downloading the iPhone app, I have found the rain and thunderstorm combination a particular favourite when I require focus. An everyday app with a beautiful and minimalist user-interface. Available for download on iTunes →


Nostromo is a minimalist note taking app for iPhone, created by studio Coloramama. It allows you taking notes, making photos, incorporating existing images from your phone library, and creating sketches all in one interface. The navigation is fluid, intuitive, and requires zero learning curve. I love the cross-shaped control that lets you switch between the four functions. It is also pleasing that the app loads extremely fast on my phone. A slick, simplified tool for note taking that is delightful to the senses.


Mindarin introduced me to their wonderful new iOS app that I have had the pleasure of using for the last couple of weeks, that not only offers a wonderful user experience, but also features a beautifully minimal display. The app is Luna — a calculator that makes calculations instantly as you type, while keeping your expression clean and readable. It allows you to save your results as well as complete calculations, operate them, edit them, and create lists. The designers explain: We designed Luna to be truly useful. Most iOS calculators differentiate by adding cute gestures or pretty colours, our goal was to create the ultimate useful calculator, one you could use to do a quick operation or keep track of your business expenses. But keep it simple, clean and minimal. Admittedly, there are a couple of minor bugs with Luna, but as with every newly developed app, the more it is used, the better it can become. It is the aesthetics of Luna that leaves me impressed though along with the feature to alternate between black and white themes with a simple shake of the device.


Lapka has introduced another clever health tracking accessory: the Breath Alcohol Monitor. The Lapka BAM is an accessory for your phone that allows you to track alcohol metabolism over time and compare and share your measurements with friends. Another piece where technology and aesthetics come together in harmony. Lapka BAM is a minimalist black ceramic cylinder, that uses inaudible sound waves to communicate wireless with a custom app on your smartphone. The use of the Lapka BAM is easy: hold it in your fist, take a deep breath and blow for four seconds. The edge of your hand becomes the mouthpiece. The BAM icon on your phone screen will fill up completely when finished. The design of the app is cleverly done: the more drunk one is, the simpler the appearance of the app becomes. One sees an indication of the current blood alcohol level along with a description of what that means in practical terms.


San Francisco based audio accessories brand Native Union, strive to bring communication back to how it should be: simple and enjoyable. With this in mind, they have designed the award winning Switch – a compact, lightweight, and portable Bluetooth speaker. It pairs to your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch with wireless ease, letting you listen to all your audio with unmatched sound and quality. The name Switch derives from its ability to play audio effectively in both a vertical and horizontal position. Aside from its sound quality, it’s the beautifully minimalist box design that has me particularly impressed. The speaker’s rubber exterior encases all sides of the box except the metal speaker screen. The exterior also features the Native Union logo, which unfortunately is its only aesthetic flaw. I would have preferred a more subtle (same colour) engraving. However, an intuitive volume wheel inspired by hi-fi audio systems is convenient to use, regardless of the speaker’s position. Switch comes in a variety of colours and is available on both the Native Union and the Apple stores. Images courtesy of Apple.


Math done simply. Designed in the Swiss style, Sumhold is a calculator that instantly calculates and stores numbers with a fiercely reductive interface and simple swipe gesture. This is the result of a beautifully developed iPhone app by Chad Voss, an independent interaction designer from Seattle. Sumhold, featuring an attractive minimalist design, makes complex calculations and number storage simple. Sumhold is made for those everyday calculations (e.g. groceries and budgets) when you need to do simple arithmetic while keeping track of previous calculations and results. Unlike most basic calculators, Sumhold keeps a running tally of your current calculation at the top and, when calculations become complex, automatically inserts parentheses to keep everything clearly readable. There is no need for an “=” button because it calculates as you type. When a calculation is complete and you need to store the result for later, you simply drag it down toward the keypad into Sumhold’s scratch-line to make a temporary button. Having downloaded this app myself, I must say that it is a joy to use. Incredibly simple both in aesthetic and function. Currently available on the iTunes store.


There is roughly a bajillion alarm apps out there, some of them analyze your sleep, draw fancy diagrams, show twitter streams, news and weather… What I like about this app is the freedom from clutter, both in the UI and functionality. Wake iPhone app, created by Tiny Hearts, does one thing and does it well – it wakes you up. There are three waking modes: slap & flip, which allows you to slap the phone to snooze and flip it over to turn the alarm off; shake, the mode useful to heavy sleepers for it makes you shake the phone repeatedly before turning off the alarm; and swipe, a basic mode that turns the alarm off when you swipe the screen of your phone. The design of the app is minimal and intuitive. I love the dial, which reminds me of the classic iPod controls. Among other features – the ability to save eight repeatable alarms and dedicate them to specific days of the week and the choice of twelve alarm sounds, progressively getting louder as they play. Watch the demo video to see the Wake app in action.


This brightly colored object is a concept DAB radio by Norwegian design duo Theo Tveterås and Lars Marcus Vedeler, who work under the moniker Skrekkøgle. The piece is a witty and unusual step away from the Apple-esque idea of minimalism in electronics. It goes back to basics and employs a humble cork as an on/off switch. Aside from its intuitive function, I like the fact that Plugg gives a new perspective on how we physically interact with our devices. Check out the video to see the piece in action.


Miami based company OCDesk, the self-proclaimed crusader for a more organized world (OCD – see what they did there?), created an OCDock – a neat iPhone docking station that attaches to your iMac and Thunderbolt monitors. The product’s most notable feature is the paper-thin cable that runs underneath the display stand, making it look wireless. Here is what designers say about OCDock on their already fully successful Kickstarter page: Less truly is more, but only so if the function is at the core. With these inspiring design principles in mind, we wanted to create a scaled back dock that would use as little material and space as possible while offering the most feature rich and comfortable docking and undocking experience. Designed as a seamless companion to Apple devices, OCDock is made using the same technologies and materials. It has been CNC machined from a solid piece of high-grade aluminium, glass bead blasted and anodized to match the finish of the iMac/Thunderbolt Display. The piece is also ergonomically conscious. It makes an iPhone easy to interact with while charging. Check out the video to see OCDock in action.


It struck me, reading Fast Company’s recent profile of Tadashi Yanai and his company Uniqlo, just how minimalist the Unique Clothing Warehouse really is. Yes, I’d be a fool to admit that the brand embodies the aesthetics of minimalism entirely (have one look at their website), but also wrong to omit the small and large ways that it is visually reductive (the much lauded Jil Sander collaboration proved its potential in this regard, and even today a customer could construct looks in a similar vein from what is currently available – I certainly do). But what really occurred to me, reading this article, are the ways in which the brand is practically minimalist. For whereas something like Jil Sander may look minimalist, actually owning and using the products reveal other ways in which it isn’t (how minimalist is it really to have dry-clean-only clothes or to wear such delicate fabricates amounting to deep care and deep pockets?) Naoki Takizawa, who previously worked as the lead designer for Issey Miyake, notes that [a]t Issey Miyake, it was about putting on more and more, and at Uniqlo, it’s about taking away. Cut, cut, cut! Speaking of an autumn/winter 2012 parker, Jeff Chu writes: But...


Dieter Rams’ Ten Principles for Good Design inspired the latest weather app, WTHR, by Visual Designer David Elgena. The identity of Braun products subtly come through with the classic minimalist forms, universal icons, intuitive display and clean, simple font. The drop shadows on the symbol displays and toggle button for temperature conversion add depth while using the app which makes the iPhone transform into another (Apple) product. For $0.99 at the App store, it sounds like a bargain. After all, how often do we really need to know that today’s highest temperature in was 70C at 2.20pm when conditions were partly cloudy at 83% humidity? Stop wasting time staring at weather radars and atmospheric pressure readings, you’re not an airline pilot…WTHR™ Indeed. Devoid of all unnecessary information stripped down to just what most people in moderate climates need, I think WTHR celebrates the trend of good design in a sensory-overload culture. Check out this YouTube video for a short demo.