Minimalissimo


Search results for “Brazil”

On Thursday 12 June, the next FIFA World Cup in Brazil begins, and yes, even on Minimalissimo we have some beautiful design related to it, because I would like to introduce the wonderful website brazilfourteen.com. Brazil Fourteen is a website that shows all the matches of the tournament, allowing you to customize it with any of the participating teams national colors. You can also download a fixture list to be in synchronization with your calendar app along with a limited edition B2 poster, printed in silver on ebony colorplan. Brazil Foruteen is a project by the British design studio Karoshi and the dynamic website was developed by Paul Davis.


Lucas Dias is a young Brazilian photographer and video-artist based in Barcelona who has recently opened the second show of his touring exhibition Cuerpos Urbanos (Urban Bodies). The series of double-exposures explores the limit between people and their surroundings — the skin of the body and the skin of the city — ultimately communicating the complexity of those relationships in an elegant, effortless manner. It is in the limit between body and landscape that the proposal for Urban Bodies is drawn. In an attempt of reenchantment with the world, diaphanous mirages are drawn, ethereal and subtle, provoking the observer’s eye. They reveal skins of transparent folds, and within the folds, invisible landscapes. With a background in Architecture studies, Lucas maintains the concept of ephemeral and diaphanous even in the exhibition design — the images were printed in large plates of transparent acetate, floating suspended in the air. Discussing the process behind his work, he reveals that Cuerpos Urbanos was the result of long and painful exploration, after many experiments and thoughts, confirming that a simple result is often the culmination of many iterations and hard work. Cuerpos Urbanos will be open at the aDa Gallery in Barcelona until the end of June...


MiniMod takes pre-fab living to the next level! Designed by MAPA Architects, this intelligent structure is a lovely solution for alternative and sustainable living. The prefabricated modules are completely customizable, allowing the user to design a dwelling focused on their needs and preferences. After construction, the modules are transported via truck to their final destination. MiniMod is composed of a steel frame with natural recycled pine on the interior contrasted with painted pine on the facade. Several green technologies are featured in the dwelling; among them is a rainwater filter, ventilated facade, green roof, and LED lighting. The single module in the photographs is located in Brazil. Off-site and no waste construction allow the home to leave a minuscule environmental footprint. The 26 square meter floor plan includes a bedroom, living and dining rooms, and a kitchen and bathroom. Floor to ceiling windows and a covered patio connect the home with the outdoors. MiniMod has it all: the elegant design proves that prefabricated living can be beautiful and good for the environment. Minimal in aesthetic and minimal environmental impact, MiniMod is truly a win for contemporary living.


26 year-old Guilherme Wentz is a furniture designer based in Brazil. With an amazing background of awards-filling history, he recently released a series of wooden pieces called Gambito, consisting of a sideboard, cupboard, and bookcase that balance on minimal structures. There is something very poetic in a mass lying on a fragile support to withstand gravity. While that physical condition is a given, the physical appearance of these furnishings is customizable — giving one the ability to make this series a truly unique and personal possession. I especially love the cantilevered sideboard for its asymmetry and its push for imbalance. The concept is not new to architecture, but can be to furnitures to test the limit of functionality. Simple and daring, the Gambito Collection challenges its users to reevaluate the stronghold of structural proportions, as well as the direct translation of that into minimal designs.


Migliari House is an impressive arrangement of white forms loacted in a suburban area of Brazil. Designed by Domo Arquitetos, the structure consists of several boxy forms, each of which contains a different space organized by function. The living spaces are separated by interior walls that feature cutouts, light wells, and large openings instead of traditional doors. The bedrooms are grouped together in the east wing of the home. The linear grouping of the bedrooms represents family union. The exterior is largely closed off from the street, allowing for an introverted space that emphasizes domestic life. The back of the home, however, features sliding glass doors that embrace the tranquil outdoors. I’m captivated by the concept of this home. I love how the different masses interact: their intersection creates exciting shapes and shadows. The division of space by individual forms is a logical and beautiful design for a family home.


House Floradas is designed around interactions. The home is structured so each occupant knows where the others are located: allowing them to seek interaction or individuality. Designed by Obra Arquitetos, House Floradas is located in São Paulo, Brazil. The home consists of three stories with strategically placed openings. The openings on the exterior flood the home with light, while the interior voids distribute light and connect the internal spaces. House Floradas is a simple home with a big voice! The binding concept of interaction is brilliant for a family home. This concept is apparent throughout the structure, allowing for an elegance often found in form-follows-function design.


Brazilian photographer and architecture student Vinícius Vitoriano Barbosa, based in São Paulo, has recently created a minimalist photographic paper series titled, Less is More. The whole concept of the project can be summarised in this phrase by legendary abstract expressionist painter Hans Hofmann: The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak. Vitoriano explains that the goal was to find an object as simple as possible that was capable of creating diversity, textures, shadow and light: the essence of photography. The chosen object to achieve this, was paper. Through this simple and commonplace industrialised material, were framed compositions of organic shapes that recall nature. What I particularly like about this project is that it gives the viewer a chance to be in touch with the essence of photography, rather than distract them with the trivial. Vitoriano has produced something really quite beautiful with this series. Less is indeed more.


Purpose Inc., a furniture and housewares company based in Utah, have designed this wonderfully minimalist take on an iconic symbol that is the rocking chair. They call it Rokur. Perfect for that moment of relaxation and reflection, this attractive chair design, particularly impressive from the side, has an ease and simplicity about it that features thin straight lines where possible. According to Purpose Inc.: The design was an attempt to capture the look and feel of relaxation. By removing extraneous patterns and ornate fillers, we created a chair that is as beautiful as it is functional. Rokur, featured here in Brazilian cherry, is also offered with seat and/or back cushions, but you wouldn’t want those, right?


Designed by typically minimalistic, contemporary-modern Brazilian architect Marcio Kogan and his StudioMK27, Casa Osler is composed primarily by two prismatic volumes in reinforced concrete, glass and wood, positioned in such a way as to leave plenty of open space for a swimming pool and garden. The downstairs prism contains the rooms and living areas, and the upper storey houses a kitchen with a privileged view. The house is fit for its location in Brasilia, with its tiled mural designed by Athos Bulcão, who had long years of collaborating with Brazilian modernist architects such as Oscar Nieyemer and Roberto Burle Marx. Photography by Zuleika de Souza & Claudio Dupas.


Lately I have been slightly obsessed with the work of photographer James Silverman. His ability to capture spatial qualities and light conditions of stunning homes around the world is endless. Today I would like to go back in time a little, featuring project from 2006 and designed by one of my all time favorite architects, Isay Weinfeld. Casa Iporanga is located in Iporanga, Brazil. Sophisticated layout and elegant use of materials seamlessly translate to incredible ease of living. Every room is connected to the outdoors, maximizing not only ventilation but also the luxury of such stunning environment. Weinfeld does his magic in carving out special zones within the property, combining envy-worthy luxury with casual settings where the comfort of living presents itself just the way it should be.


Based in São Paulo, independent fashion design brand Cotton Project seeks to produce quality pieces for a group of individuals who share the same lifestyle and a different perspective on beach culture. They aim to create clothes that are coherent with a tropical country like Brazil, but that nonetheless carry the cultural baggage inspired by youth subcultures of music, art, photography and fashion, and apply typical urban elements to the brazilian beach culture. We believe in a downsized brand, that connects to a global culture and is responsible for the environment it lives in. The clothes are visibly well-tailored and the brand styling is an exercise in simplicity. I love the apparent softness of the materials and their fit. The brand also pairs up with musicians, artists and designers in several one-off side projects, sell a range of accessories, magazines and other international design products often not available in South America, as well as housing open happy hour parties in their studio. A true lifestyle brand.


Remodelled by Brazilian architect Guilherme Torres, this building is originally a 1940’s construction and the former home to Victor Brecheret, famed Italian-Brazilian artist and sculptor. After his death in the 1950’s, for decades it served as a foundation of part of his collection and a deposit, being then acquired and re-designed by Torres as his own home and work space. The premise was to update the building, reflecting Torres’ contemporary language and preserving the basic structure. The floor plan hasn’t suffered many changes, mainly openings and finishing materials. The addition of a retractable glass roof, to be opened on summer days, helps to maintain a mild climate. The latticed wooden structure, descendant of the arabic mashrabiya, is an element often used in contemporary Brazilian architecture to assuage the strong sunlight. It follows the same pattern of the doorway structure, a striking element in the building’s composition. High in the façade, there is a neon piece by artist Pinky Wainer that reads: Land of the free, home of the brave. The combination of latticed structures and simple, geometric architecture is a very particular feature of contemporary Brazilian architecture, one I always enjoy finding. All the natural light filtering into the house gives it a light and airy feel… I’m...