Minimalissimo


Search results for “Japan”

Minimalist design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture. British minimalist architect John Pawson has designed a ribbon to support the disaster relief effort, following the earthquake and tsunami, earlier this month. Electronic version of the design is available to download for attachment to websites and emails. A donation can be made online. I would like to express my love, respect and admiration to the Japanese population. Stay strong!


We recently caught up with Håndværk to discuss the brand, its designs, fabrics, and future. Describe your path to creating the brand, Håndværk. We felt there was a void in the market for a label that was solely dedicated to high-end essentials — crafting each piece from the finest fabrics, and focused on the details as the foundation to function. From the start, the ultimate goal was to create a label that we would love as customers, something that would make us proud. Our passion for fine fabrics was the main force driving Håndværk’s creation. Håndværk is an interesting & unusual brand name. Can you explain why you choose it? It is a Danish word that stands for artisanal, a trade, or handy-work. We felt it represents the soul of the label. At the core, we want to highlight that pride achieved by the craftsman with his honest work. We want to convey that making quality garments is a humble and tedious endeavour, miles away from the hype of the fashion world. We have always been huge fans of Danish design, specifically mid-century modern furniture — with the focus on simplicity, honest materials and function. These values influence how we go...


Tokyo-based design office id created a charming wooden garden, for coffee appreciation in its simplest form, for Café Ki. The ambient is a case study for tiny shops, affirming its visual identity through a strong concept and leaving unnecessary embellishments behind. The café consists of a large white canvas in which tables are organically supported by black branches; mimicking a patch of woods. It is worth noting that Ki means Tree in Japanese — the pictogram-like simplification is quite elegant and straightforward — no gimmicks here. The brand identity of Café Ki keeps it functional and affordable with smart stickers and simple print materials as tools for serving each customer’s coffee needs. Not only does the café offer a sharp visual distinctiveness, but I reckon, would make for a great brand to import as a franchise. An increasingly rare and satisfying equation: affordability + style.


From one of Japan’s luminaries of simplicity, Tokyo-based design studio Nendo, comes a delightfully ethereal furniture collection created for Italian company Desalto, known for their metal furniture. The wonder of the collection lies precisely in the fluid, light way the hard steel is worked, bent as naturally as if it were paper, as described by Nendo. By adding flipped, bent and wrapped details to metal sheets and rods, the ordinarily hard material gains new functionality and a light, flexible feel, as though the metal has become paper or cloth. The collection comprises three benches, a chair, a family of small tables, a coat rack and a family of wall shelves. Imagery courtesy of Desalto.


Let me present you the minimalist Classic watch by Melbourne based AÃRK Collective. What I like about the Classic watch are the little geometric details. The first hand, outlined by a dodecagon representing the hours, is simple but the minute hand, in which a small hexagon is integrated, stands out. The hexagon is also used as an outline for the independent second representing the seconds. The crown is triangle shaped. Perfectly balanced in design and function, this watch is a true representation of AÃRK. The band and outershell is made from durable plastic while an internal case made of stainless steel protects the Japanse Quartz movement. The finish on both the case and the band is matte satin which makes the Classic soft to touch and comfortable to wear. The Classic is available in multiple colours. Pick one that suits your taste, mood and outfit.


Koya No Sumika is an extension to a traditional home in Yaizu, Japan. The extension was designed for a young couple by mA-style Architects. The Japanese firm came up with a modern design with space saving solutions. The result is a refreshing juxtaposition to the traditional architecture of the original home. The exterior is a balance between white cement board and natural wood. The mix of crisp white and warm wood continues on the interior. The lofted ceiling features triangles of unfinished wood. White walls frame the lower portion of the home, sprinkled on both sides with built-in furniture. The decor is bare, just a few plants and lightbulbs strung from the ceilings. A simple courtyard garden adds a touch of green and connects the expansion with the original building. Koya No Sumika is a gorgeous structure inside and out. The materials are arranged so as to add character to the space, without losing its minimal appeal. Overall, this is a charming home expansion that the residents will enjoy for years to come.


Dedicated, disciplined and ridiculously handsome menswear label, SCTT BNDCTN is being released for order September 2014. The label has existed as an enigma in the fashion world since 2012 and had existed purely as a brand. Through various social media outlets to the tune of Tumblr, Facebook and Soundcloud; SCTT BNDCTN has been an encompassment of sensory intrigue. That is until now. The intensely strong brand and clear dedication to adorning men is the work of its inceptionist and Master Tailor, Warren Harrison. Based in Melbourne, the pieces are a result of tireless precision. The influence of Japanese patternmaking, traditional tailoring and experimental design is obvious and fiercely beautiful. SCTT BNDCTN celebrates the male form through a methodical use of linen, wool, leather and cotton. The designer’s passion is clear. Although a rarity, this handcrafted menswear line for discerning, stoic types, is undoubtedly one to watch. And listen to. And be inspired by the mood it instills. There is a clarity and stillness to SCTT BNDCTN that should be celebrated. Photography by Jem Taylor and make-up by Nadja Mott.


This florist’s home in Japan’s Mie prefecture was designed to inspire the resident’s craft. The dwelling was completed by Japanese firm Shinichi Ogawa & Associates in May of this year. Florist Studio utilizes a refreshing simple design to offer seamless views for a creative live/work space. The most stunning feature of the home is the glass walls that span the entire length of the building. The glass is held in place by the floor and roof slabs; this structure eliminates the need for view-impeding columns. The long stretch of windows is reminiscent of a painting in a gallery. The gallery aesthetic continues throughout the home. A cantilevered counter runs the full length of the structure, forming a bed headboard and bathroom vanity on one end, and an office desk on the other. Carefully chosen furniture is placed in the other rooms. The attention paid to each detail makes the whole home feel like a work of art. Florist Studio a perfect dwelling for its resident and its environment.


Shirahama Roh Pinggu is a small seaside home designed by Okuwada Architects Office. Located in Wakayama, Japan, this single story home is structured to work with the island landscape. The sand and sea are on the southern side of the home, while mountains surround the other three sides. The southern wall of windows embraces the sea views. The kitchen and living room are situated in this part of the home. The mountain facing rooms contain more private areas, such as the bedrooms and bathrooms. Wooden floors connect the home with the forest behind it. A white and glass facade, and a galvanized steel roof, complete the home’s light and airy aesthetic. I love the simple design of this resort home. The soft colors and low lying structure minimize the visual impact the home has on the environment. The simple interior allows the residents to direct their focus out towards the landscape. Overall, Shirahama Roh Pinggu is a lovely vacation dwelling for a family. Photography by Tada Yuko / Yuko Tada Photography.


UID Architects is a Japanese architecture firm that’s based in Hiroshima, Japan. In 2009, the firm has completed a house and atelier for a doll artist in Minoh city near Osaka. Upon the first glance at this structure, one would only see hovering white facades. The raised structures open up an opportunity for openings at the top and bottom, complemented with glass enclosure. Calling these rectangular boundaries as belts, architect Keisuke Maeda said: A simple operation of overlapping belts obscures site boundaries and formulates a relationship to the site and the neighborhood. Greenscaping the interior of the house to weave in the green space of the exterior further highlights the seemingly expanding footprint, which is smaller than expected. Walls were replaced by built-in furnitures to minimize spatial usage, as well as to connect interior spaces. The minimal yet complex design is what makes this house stand out. I adore the functional and effective moves that the architect used to modify such a small site. Even the white path leading from the outside to the inside, adorn with pebbles and green, is a simple decision that helps lighten up this atelier. Photography by Hiroshi Ueda


I was recently introduced to high-end European menswear brand Enfin Levé and their superbly simple Eorri collection. As opposed to the brands mainline avant-garde aesthetics, Eorri extends the direction by releasing minimalist, simple designs made with the finest fabrics for a comfortable, everyday wear with a unique identity. Handcrafting their clothes in small, local ateliers and manufacturers in Italy, Switzerland and Poland, the seasonless silhouettes of Eorri are easy to wear, with an aim to provide the greatest comfort. Having personally experienced the quality of this Eorri collection, which includes slim fit t-shirts made with soft and thin cotton, elastic waistband pants and shorts, Enfin Levé have successfully produced relaxed, minimalist design with an intriguing style, establishing their identity in the men’s market. Available in various menswear stores in Japan and United States, Enfin Levé also ship internationally. Photography by Mateusz Bral / Model: Olaf Piwowa


M Residence is yet another stunning dwelling by acclaimed architecture firm Shinichi Ogawa & Associates. Completed in 2013 and located in Fukui, Japan, M Residence is a remarkably simple home for two families. One half of the structure houses a young couple and child, while the other is home to the child’s grandmother. Both halves of the home are nearly identical. The interiors feature an open-floor plan. The lack of walls lends a fluidity to the space and cuts out cumbersome square footage. Furniture is limited to only the necessities. Sliding panels are placed along the southern wall of the home, allowing the space easy exposure to the outdoors. Shared spaces include the porch, car park, and garden. M Residence is the perfect solution to living with extended family. Both families can enjoy the comfort and convenience of living so close, yet their divided spaces can easily feel a world apart. That Shinichi Ogawa & Associates were able to achieve this while maintaining the design’s effortless and minimal aesthetic is equally impressive.