Minimalissimo


Search results for “Natural”

I have long been a reader of Thisispaper Magazine, and when in late 2012 they decided to expand to the analogue world, selling a range of stunning and simplistic products, I for one, was thrilled to explore the designs. Initially launching a series of bags and rucksacks, Thisispaper Shop also recently introduced a beautiful range of kitchenware. It is however, one of their bag designs that I find to be something our Minimalissimo readers will appreciate most. The Natural Irma Bag is incredibly basic with a light linen material. Measuring 25 x 42cm, the bottom is made of nubuck leather. Other leather elements are made of vegetable-tanned natural leather. The lining is 100% cotton and features two small interior pockets and a thick cotton string. Beauty, we believe, lies in the simple objects we use everyday, without even acknowledging it.


Overlooking the seaside in Greece is the elegant Villa Melana. Created by local designers Panagiotis Papassotiriou and Valia Foufa, the focal point of the home is the spectacular view of the sea and sky. Each of the main living areas was designed to take in the stunning Greek environment, and the materials used were carefully selected to incorporate the home into the natural landscape. On the exterior, rough stone walls tie the home in with the rocky surrounding landscape. Bright white walls contrast with the stone façade. The white walls also reflect the sun, which helps the house stay cool in the dry heat. Climate-appropriate landscaping, wood terraces, and stone paths create an inviting outdoor atmosphere. The stone continues on the interior, providing a welcome connection to the landscape outside. Walls of glass provide a view to the pool while sleek doors open to a covered terrace. Adjacent to the terrace, the infinity pool pairs perfectly with the soft Mediterranean water. Just imagine the lazy days and perfect nights at this seaside getaway. What could be more perfect?


Rob Kennon Architects designed this lovely family home located in a suburb of Melbourne, Australia. Burnley House is a perfect example of beautiful and liveable modern design. The home is divided into private and public areas, distinguished by a clever use of materials. The public areas of are filled with airy materials and a plethora of natural light, while the private rooms are smaller, darker, and cozy. The large and open great room features tall ceilings and a stretch of white cabinetry. Long, sleek windows occupy a position on every wall and wood floors bring a pleasant texture into the room. In the bedrooms, the walls are clad in a deep brown wood and the floors are covered with soft rugs. The mix of materials in Burnley House is flawless. Concrete, wood, black-framed windows, and smooth white surfaces are incorporated throughout the home, creating visual interest and continuity of design. I love how the furnishings completely compliment the surfaces and textures of the structure. Every piece of Burnley House is seamlessly pulled together, creating a structure any family would be lucky to call home.


Architecture infused with natural form: That is how Los Angeles based designer Zaid Affas describes the Spring/Summer 2015 collection of his eponymous label. Luxurious fabrics from the mills of Japan, Europe and Great Britain come in clear but warm colors, such as off white, cream and dark sand, matched with austere silhouettes in black and distressed silver. I’m very much taken by the decisive message of the Zaid Affas’ work, which is perfectly conveyed by the very sunny yet austere imagery of the current collection. The architectural silhouettes are presented by the models like sculptures from an ancient culture, while heat and weathering seem to refine the surface of the fabrics in a unique way. It’s a perfect balance between ease and severity.


Flood installation by Alban Guého has been selected to participate in Paris in the next nuit blanche festival. The theme for this year is the climate echoing the COP 21 to be held in December 2015. A project with a minimalist look focusing on an essential matter for the planet. In recent years many extreme natural phenomena took place in the world with a frequency that is accelerating. The history of Paris has also experienced remarkable weather conditions including in 1910 with an exceptional flood that inundated much of the town and paralyzed public transport. This phenomenon of heavy precipitation remained, and over 100 years on should become more frequent due to the current climate change. Flood serves as a reminder of the fragility of our planet. This installation is composed of two overlying structures, placed opposite to one another on the floor and ceiling, connected by a series of PVC sections. A black liquid, either oil or paint, will be pumped through the PVC representing the slow and continuous degradation of natural elements and resources. A strong impression. A strong message. Support this beautiful project on Kickstarter.


Experiments in Natural Philosophy is Australian artist Todd Robinson‘s latest exhibition, having just wrapped up at the Galerie Pompom in Sydney, where large balloon sculptures combine a form of proto-engineering with weird yet wonderful studies in comparative materiality. This new body of work draws on an ongoing series of balloon inspired sculptures featured in his previous exhibitions, which feature balloons that droop and slump as the force of gravity appears to bear down upon them, presenting Robinson’s inquiry into sculptural presence, materiality and conditions of audience reception. In conceiving this body of work, Robinson references the history of science and Natural Philosophy, a predecessor of modern science that had yet to dismiss the concept of nature, rendering imaginary forces visible of which we are unaware, yet appear natural to conventional observation.


Situated in Paço de Arcos, a seaside neighborhood of Lisbon, this beautiful and entirely white house, designed by Jorge Mealha architect, proposes an arrangement of several solids trying to attenuate the overall mass due to a huge functional program requested by the client. A very functionalist approach. The result is a dialogue between a range of different solids and voids, using light to draw or reflect on the surfaces, proposing a changeable reading of space and volumes during the day. The metal screening/shading devices create large smooth textured surfaces on the façade of the house, emphasizing forms and controlling the relationships between indoor and outdoor, or between external and internal spaces. The staircase and main corridor are finished in white painted metal, which are slightly detached from the walls, leaving opportunity for natural light to pass in between. Pure minimalism at its best. Photography by Jorge Mealha.


Yiannis Ghikas’ Game of Trust Hanger is designed based on three interlocking, leaning elements. The Game of Trust itself is one based on trusting your partner, and falling into a position of support, reinforcing the strength of the connection. This Hanger plays up to this notion. Available in a number of painted or natural finishes, from solid wood, due to its composition, the piece is also modular in nature. Based out of Athens, Greece, Ghikas designed this piece based on three identical Y-shaped elements, each one supports and at the same time is supported by one of the others, resulting in an embrace that transformed the units into a unity. This in itself, the minimal composition of its elements, is beautiful. Photography courtesy of Nikos Alexopoulos.


Imagine taking a stroll through the beautiful city of Rio de Janeiro, enjoying breathtaking views of the natural landscape that embraces the city. While visiting the famous Parque Lage you notice an unusual structure inside the central Palace. When you dare to enter the tiny citadel, everything is covered in plastic and overtly orange. You’ve been lured in by the art collective known as Penique Productions. The duo builds customized inflatable balloons that fit and fill their chosen venue, guerrilla style: Penique Productions appropriates the original site that loses its routine to become part of the work getting a new identity. The balloon acts as a border and frames a new space. The container is also the content blurring the idea of the art object. The beauty of this site specific lies in numerous factors: the invasion of space by a vessel that manages to alter the perception of a visitor but does not harm the building in any way; it denies the original textures to shower it with a homogeneous quality; and finally, it works as conceptual exercise in reduction and simplification. It is a variation of minimalism when a classic building, filled with details and adornments, finds itself...


The Brick Lamp by HCWD Studio is a minimalist lamp that works very intuitively with a hand gesture. A warm toned light is activated when the lamp is raised and deactivated when laid flat. This clever switching mechanism is designed to work on all kinds of firm and horizontal surfaces. The side facets function as a natural handle and also direct the light when the lamp stands on its side. The lamps weight is engineered to make it stand stabilised. The objective is to capture the moment of light — being concealed and revealed. This unique lighting design would turn a quotidian routine into an enriching experience, providing an unexpected, fun quality to a daily object. The Brick Lamp is multi-functional and one can use the lamp wirelessly. A built-in battery allows the lamp to glow for up to five hours with a single charge. The housing of the Brick Lamp comes in three styles: concrete (light and dark), wood and metal (silver and black). My personal favorite is the metal (silver) edition with the matte finish on the facets and brush texture on the top surface.


Casa Na Xemena is a stunning modern home overlooking the Mediterranean in Ibiza, Spain. Ramón Esteve, a design studio based in Valencia, designed the home in 1995 and completed construction in 2003. The site’s natural landscape was crucial in the design of this home. Most of the structure’s form was dictated by the sea, rocky cliffs, and sun. The exterior features a smooth white façade that reflects the heavy Mediterranean sun and contrasts beautifully with the rough cliffs and blue water. Several outdoor terraces are arranged as viewing platforms to gain the best perspective of the sea. A large infinity pool is positioned at a key point on the hillside, so that the line between the pool and the sea is elegantly blurred. The home’s interior keeps the white walls from the façade and features concrete floors and floating staircases. A sprinkling of windows illuminate the home without allowing too much heat inside. Geometric furniture, some of which was designed by Ramón Esteve, is placed in the interior and by the pool. Casa Na Xemena provides a striking response to a remarkable landscape. The house provides a true relationship with the environment, resulting in a magnificent sensory experience for its lucky residents. Photography by Eugeni Pons...


The Knob Spice Grinder by Umbra Shift has a traditional look with a modern twist. The grinder consists of two parts: the grinder and a separate base. On top of the cylinder shaped grinder, one can see the grinders turning mechanism. This mechanism was inspired by an oven knob — an archetype for turning, the creators explain. The grinder includes an internal ceramic mechanism to finely grind spices. The separate base serves as a catch-all or pinch pot for freshly-ground spices. Ideal for cooking or presenting salt and pepper at the table. The grinder has a really nice aesthetic. The base and bowl are both made of beechwood and are available in natural, black and aqua finishes. My personal favorites are the natural and black finished grinders. The Knob Grinder is part of the inaugural collection of Umbra Shift, an extension of Umbra Studio focusing on contemporary collections, presented during the International Contemporary Furniture Fair last year. The mission of Umbra Shift is to rethink all manner of everyday items, in minimal design and for maximum effect.