Minimalissimo


Search results for “Paris”

The beauty that is so obvious in this Parisian apartment is in the stark contrast of the use and proportion of the stone designed within a space that uses minimal details. P Apartment by Claudio Silvestrin Architects while resembling a monastery at first glance, is more like an art gallery when taken for a closer look. Every piece of furniture is custom designed by Claudio Silvestrin except for a Wegner Chair. From the 13m long cast bronze kitchen bar to the flushed mounted wall television, these architectural details have been beautifully positioned and installed. And every view from the penthouse apartment is intentionally designed to frame the amazing Paris skyline. Its contrast from the usual highly decorative Parisian architecture and from the busy city is perhaps a much welcomed escape. Photos by James Morris.


The San Paolo Parish by Fuksas Architetto, completed in 2009, is a carefully articulated play with volumes. In concept, the main space is a box suspended within a box. It’s a play of intersecting regulated shapes, strategically placed, with emphasis on the void. The relief between volumes is therefore where the natural light enters the structure, allowing for shards of light to move through the spaces over time. Light enters both horizontally and vertically through the space. Emphasising the play with nature and built elements. Located in Foligno, Italy, the San Paolo Parish was initially conceived for a competition, which was won in 2001. The jury cited that the design was a sign of innovation that met the latest international research, becoming a symbol of rebirth for the city after the earthquake. Also therefore capturing the essence of what the spiritual and meditative space is intended to embody. This project features the use of pure geometries and natural day-lighting that create a spiritual connection with the heaven. Comprised predominantly of concrete, glass and metal, the series of regulated shapes that comprise the San Paolo Parish complex is beautiful. The lines are consistent, beautifully executed and each element is carefully curated....


This beautiful piece of modern architecture was recently finished by Vicens + Ramos architect bureau. The church graces a new and largely undeveloped residential area in Cordoba, Spain. The building’s innovative structure is comprised of a single prism and a tall short facade. The facade is combined with the bell-tower and skylight – the components that are usually separated in historical church architecture. The prism, made from white concrete, has a fluted base able to let in horizontal light. The interior of the church is minimal and unembelished. It is designed to accentuate the focal points of the composition, namely the altar area and the roof paintings. The light, coming from the skylight and skillfully directed by the curved shape of the ceiling, completes and unifies the space. Photography courtesy of Vicens + Ramos


Though not the most minimalist posters out there, the reduction of the two cities into one poster series, Paris versus New York, by Vahram Muratyan, cofounder of ViiiZ, really hits the spot. Muratyan puts it most elegantly: A visual but friendly match between those two cities seen by a lover of Paris wandering through New York’s infinite details, clichés and contradictions : this way, please. Something that I know I’d love to receive for a Christmas gift this year!


Xirel Segard’s Galalux Lamp is a floating sphere of concrete lux and a creative approach to illumination. Made from concrete and available in two varying sizes, the magical orb of light is both a sculptural and functional addition to space. The thin sliver of exposed light that seeps from the center of the sphere acts as the functional injection into an otherwise geometric form. Although it seems to levitate with this streak of light passing through it, the materiality itself helps ground the object to the space. Based in Paris, Segard has been involved in numerous exhibitions and the recipient of many awards. Weighing in around 3kgs, the Galalux is one of many of her experimentations with concrete. Her work is articulated form-wise with a somewhat lightness, somehow due to the aeration of the concrete itself, but there also exists this a duality and juxtaposition, through the material’s strength. This experimentation and playfulness has given birth to this beautiful piece of industrial design that subtly illuminates and just as subtly adds a sense of curiosity. Photography courtesy of Xirel Segard.


Flood installation by Alban Guého has been selected to participate in Paris in the next nuit blanche festival. The theme for this year is the climate echoing the COP 21 to be held in December 2015. A project with a minimalist look focusing on an essential matter for the planet. In recent years many extreme natural phenomena took place in the world with a frequency that is accelerating. The history of Paris has also experienced remarkable weather conditions including in 1910 with an exceptional flood that inundated much of the town and paralyzed public transport. This phenomenon of heavy precipitation remained, and over 100 years on should become more frequent due to the current climate change. Flood serves as a reminder of the fragility of our planet. This installation is composed of two overlying structures, placed opposite to one another on the floor and ceiling, connected by a series of PVC sections. A black liquid, either oil or paint, will be pumped through the PVC representing the slow and continuous degradation of natural elements and resources. A strong impression. A strong message. Support this beautiful project on Kickstarter.


With his RTW Collection #11 Rad Hourani artfully underlines his signature style of architectural and pure looks. Besides his honored haute couture line, the Paris based designer with roots in Jordan and Canada now fields a strong additional oeuvre: his own scent Ascent, his RTW line — by the name of RAD by Rad Hourani — and a parisian gallery. While he constantly experiments and broadens his approach towards the arts and fashion through his endeavors, the ready to wear line seems to be the foundation of his unisex signature style. I’m attached to the notion of purity. And by choosing simple, stark lines, I strive to blur gender boundaries… My pieces are timeless and free of gender differentiation. — Sixth Finger Interview It is remarkable how Rad Hourani manages to persistently iterate a design language that stands out by its radical confinement in shape and color. The effect of this work will never stop awing me. His designs will never get old.


Silent is Paris-based designer Damir Doma‘s diffusion line launched in 2010. In his AW 2015 Women’s collection, a language of urban minimalism surfaces as his pieces of his look book sit aside images of architecture, taking modern sportswear into the realm of stylish elegance. Addressing the needs of the active, modern woman, curves and edges in the silhouettes of the collection translate into the sporty turtle neck collars, asymmetrical A-lines and cut-outs, suggesting they were intended for the ease of movement. Sweater dresses are explored both as oversized and fitting, while the contrast in piping, exposed stitching and seams reiterate the architectonic elements that Doma so beautifully alludes to. These poised pieces are most chic and graceful, resulting in, for lack of better words: utilitarian made very sexy.


Parisian architects duo Betillon/Dorval-Bory took on the renovation of a 20 sqm apartment with an unyielding minimalist grip. The white color feels fresh and does a marvelous job infusing amplitude to a narrow space, whilst not losing sight of a bold conceptual statement. It’s all about two simple light installations calling the shots. It is satisfying to behold a small apartment project with special care to lighting, considering the usual method of installing ready-made product design; this case in particular brings to the forefront tailor-made raw and naked lamps fixed on a small partition. The dividing barrier defines the living area and kitchen from the sleeping area and bathroom. For the larger area seven fluorescent tubes are tasked to light the way, with its colder blue-ish glow. In the private area in the corner, it’s up to a warmer glow to fill the space with two low-pressure sodium lamps (aka SOX), the same technology used on street lighting. The effect of the SOX lamps are unusual and daring for a residential project, since it annuls and reduces every color down to a monochromatic variation. In this case, the minimalism sensibility isn’t limited to a adornment free interior design, but to...


Light in Water is a remarkably beautiful installation developed by Parisian DGT architects, initially four years ago during Milan Design Week, but has now been relaunched in the Éléphant Paname Art and Dance Centre, located in Paris, for its opening event of 2015. Sixteen rings of slotted tubes fitted to the ceiling, with each hole providing sixty drops of water per second falling due to gravity, for a total amount of three tons of water continually recirculating in the space. This creates an immersive and sensitive experience using two different tones of light. The architects tell us: Light and water are essences of everything; without any light and water, there is no evolution in life for all. Light in Water is part of the exhibition Lumieres — The Play of Brilliants and will be exhibited until 31 May.


Dar Mim is an understated white home located in the picturesque coastal city of Hammamet, Tunisia. The home is designed by the Parisian based firm Septembre, a firm known for consistently producing elegant and sophisticated designs. Dar Mim is a renovation of a traditionally styled home and courtyard. Septembre preserved the integrity of the existing home by barely touching the front facade and patio, and designing a matching extension in the back. The main living areas are situated around a central courtyard. The expansion in back features a guest suite with a separate terrace. A block and void system is used in the structure to filter light into specific areas of the home. All the building materials for Dar Mim were locally sourced. The wood and metal work was done by local artisans, and the plaster walls were made using old school techniques. These traditional materials allow this renovation to blend seamlessly with the older buildings in Hammamet. Overall, the excellent materials and thoughtful styling make Dar Mim a unique and successful design. Photography by Sophia Baraket.


Amsterdam based fashion label Avelon claims to whisper, not shout. Still, the word about its impressive, effortless yet sophisticated style has spread worldwide, starting with Erik Frenken taking over as the label’s head of design in 2010 and peaking with its first show in Paris for Spring/Summer 2015. But let us have a look a the current collection first. The sculptural but relaxed silhouettes are monochromely bathed in nude tones, black, white and an extraordinary jade green. Classic styles like sporty sweaters, basecaps and shirts are deconstructed, exaggerated in their shape and combined with feminine waistlines or hemlines. A perfect blend of streetwear and immaculate tailoring. Or as the designer himself puts it: Avelon is something that changes every season but stays close to its signature: luxurious yet raw, effortless yet directional, and feminine yet tough. But I have to say that the real goal of the brand is to create energy. — style.com review