Minimalissimo


Adele Lim

Minimal. Fundamental. Elemental. Relevant.

The Los Angeles label Co have created yet another stunning collection for Resort 2015. In a theme of luxurious fabrics  molded into these sculptural forms and volumes, giving ubiquitous styles of A line, empire lines, slips and puffer coats an elegant yet sporty twist. Coming across this collection by chance, I could not believe these were the same designers I had featured 6 months ago. Co’s Resort 2015 is so beautifully styled and photographed, the images have such incredible depth. While the fabric reflect the light so the texture is highlighted, the details of each piece though minimal are pronounced. I could not think of a more beautiful way to present this collection.


Agata Bielen is a jewelry designer with a stunning minimalist namesake jewelry brand that resonates the elegance of pure stainless steel with subtle geometry. Shortly after her first exhibit upon graduating from the Architecture and Design Faculty at the Fine Academy of Fine Arts in Poland, an encounter with street style photographer The Satorialist Scott Schumann had encouraged Agata to launch her own label. Stainless steel is often seen in utilitarian objects, we unconsciously associate it with the functional rather than sculptural. Yet Agata’s design reminds us in its own way that the material is beautiful in its simplicity, its color and its consistency. Her designs are understated yet refined; the geometry is familiar yet the forms are original. The styling and photography by Kamil Zacharski completes the beautiful portrait of the entire jewelry collection.


MLTV Clothing, otherwise known as Molotov Clothing, is an independent Swedish label that has transposed classic menswear with a modern, understated yet relevant identity. The collections, known as Episodes, explore juxtaposition of forms and materials. Firm lines soften with asymmetric cuts in shirts; heavy knits combined with layers of sheer fabrics; a lot of effort has gone into exploring and expressing minimalism in its details and construction. Besides my appreciation for the technical, I was excited to come across Molotov Clothing for the awesome brand styling. MLTV’s founder Anna Sjunnesson has so kindly allowed us to take a sneak peek and to share her upcoming FW2014 collection that will be launching in late August, and shared the inspiration and direction for the collection: We love to work with contradicting themes, where the cohesively is the contrary, and using unexpected details to draw attention to the item and the art. We work hard to keep the impact on the environment at a minimum. Part of it is to create pieces where the items have a greater purpose then just a regular garment; concept, vision and ideal are important compounds in our creations. This is definitely a label to keep a lookout for. The Episodes are available at various retailers. Images...


Mansur Gavriel is the highly sought-after label with a collection of beautifully designed leather bags made and crafted in Italy. Designed by Rachel Mansur and Floriana Gavriel who moved to New York City especially to start their company, the collection first surfaced in the summer of 2013 and saw immediate success, being sold out as soon as it hit the stores. The label has continued to deliver their minimalist designs of signature tote and bucket bags that come in bold pops of single color or contrasting outer tanned leather with matte patent interiors. The craftsmanship of these bags reveal just enough detail of the effortless style behind the designs which is what I love most about this label. It is a true practice of patience to get your hands on one.


Casa No Tempo is a family farm passed down through the generations that underwent a renovation under the care of Joao Rodrigues and family, with the architect Manuel Aires Mateus. The now-converted home stay is located on a magnificent site an hour south of Lisbon in Montemor o Novo, Alentejo, known as the unspoiled Portugal with the pristine landscapes filled with oak and olive trees. The connection to the earth and the surrounding terrain is a significant part of the design in this house. The expanse of the landscape fill the rooms with views of cork trees, pastures, wild fields, dams, ponds and streams through the massive windows. While the clean, minimalist architecture details allow nature to make its presence within, modern interior fixtures and fittings allow this rural getaway to be most comfortable and luxurious. I cannot help but fall in love with all the simple yet significant touches of this farmhouse. The frameless openings of the interior emphasizes the depth of the rooms, making the height of the rooms feel infinite like the sky above. Instead of tiles, the swimming pool is spread with a sand colored plaster right up to the edge, emulating a shore line that compliments the farmhouse in site. I hope to visit this beautiful site one...


The launch of Australian label, Eska Alikai‘s AW 2014 collection by Micha Dyball consists of elegant, minimalist pieces that are indicative of both a confident presence as well as a pragmatic need for comfort. Her minimalist sensibilities are designed into soft leather, eco-friendly tencel, fleece, denim and cotton voile. The details of layering add a lot of personality into the clean, geometric pieces. I found this collection so appealing as each outfit is styled to celebrate the structure and fluidity in the mixed use of material and yet, it is easy to wear. Eska Alikai may be relatively new to deliver a full collection but the label has achieved much success in editorial exposure and already has an e-commerce site. I am looking forward to the next collection already. Images courtesy of Eska Alikai.


Connected Magazine is a new contemporary fashion magazine that has just launched its first issue. As the brainchild of Nani Lim and Pontus Samuel, the magazine started of as a school project and evolved into a platform for the Stockholm-based duo to express their identical love for photography, fashion and design; a platform that celebrates the motivation of good design instead of mere current trends: There is a very one dimensional look on fashion today, which is basically “buy! buy! buy!”, and we felt that the function behind clothes sort of got lost in translation. The style of minimalism is the tool that is used to express their aesthetic and visual language both in the design of the magazine as well as the articles they feature. The images exude an appealing simplicity and the styling of the editorials are of a minimalistic elegance. The magazine communicates the team’s personal tastes and inspiration to their audience. I love the fact that it is so personal and shared in such a beautifully crafted and designed publication, which makes this project more meaningful. As the editor Nani Lim so eloquently sums up: Most of our inspiration comes from meeting creative people and the interaction...


Designed for a group of artists to reside, work and exhibit, the architect Jun Murata of Jam Architecture transformed a house in Osaka, Japan, of former wood construction into one of modern simplicity and elegant, minimalist finishes. The spaces were carefully thought out to accommodate the needs of the artists. Public and private are logically separated: the living and dining, as well as the tatami spaces face south where one can assume the intent is so that the residents can enjoy the natural light. On the other hand, the opposite side of the house meant for reading and art installation is designed with more controlled lighting where slivers of light penetrating the interiors, making it an integral part of any art installation. The architect has acknowledged that as carefully designed this minimalist mix-use house is for the artists, plants can give the space a rich contrast. I especially love the fact that the number and type of plants chosen for the space is minimal as well, allowing the harmony of their presence compliment the spaces they are in. Images courtesy of Jun Murata / Jam Architecture.


The Rabbit Hole Brick House is a modern vernacular farmhouse designed to provide for both a residence and a veterinary practice in Gaasbeek, Belgium. Hence the architect Bart Lens of Lensass Architecten used brick as not only a construction material, but also as a concept reinforcing the existing structure. It is the binding element between past and present. A funnel-shaped annex connects the 2 buildings with the continuity of brick as the floor, wall and ceiling, emphasizing the volume that is the personality of the rural architecture. Len’s design of minimalist interiors, white walls and wood framing, as well as the simplistic furniture provide the fluid contrast to the texture of the masonry. Previously featured for his stunning minimalist lighting system °online, I love how Lens has prolifically orchestrated the details of this architecture with such sensitivity to the materials and the landscape. Images via Archdaily and Lensass Architects. Photography by Philippe van Gelooven and Bieke Claessens.


Renowned Lunetier Lionel Sonkes whose store on a small street in Brussels had commissioned Nicolas Schuybroek Architects with Marc Merckx Interiors to completely refurbish and rethink the existing shop, atelier and facade, in a warm, minimal and elegant volume. For over 20 years, Sonkes has been selling imported high-end glasses as well as custom made ones. Recognized as the Belgian equivalent of Maison Bonnet in Paris, the retail architecture by the design team had to reflect that reputation. What this optical store lacked in physical footprint was made up in its luxurious interiors. All the custom-made furniture and simple facade was designed with respect to the sleek minimalist character of the store. What I love most about this project is that instead of displaying an overwhelming variety of product, Sonkes Lunetterie has let the interior architecture speak for the atelier. The best examples executed here are the subtle volumes for merchandising, beautifully designed into wall niches, black metal framed vitrines and Carrara marble pedestals. The grey veins of the marble compliment the grey/white brushed oak wall panels and chevron-laid reclaimed oak floors, tying into the overall elegant and minimal architecture. Photography by ©CAFEINE/Thomas De Bruyne for NSArchitects and images courtesy of Nicolas Schuybroek Architects.


The monolithic architecture of the Ooike House by Matsuyama Architect and Associates creates the living experience around the views. While heavy at first glance, the imposing structure of this residence located in Fukuoka, Japan, is juxtaposed by the sleek slivers of window openings, delicate walls of glass and a skeleton-like staircase. Intersecting planes define the unique, assymetrical volumes of the interiors while the wide spacing of the joint lines of the concrete walls and floor tiles emphasize the scale of the space, making it feel more expansive than it already is. It is a different sort of comfort that I find appealing about this project. The house seems to exude the calm and cleanliness that one seeks in meditation. From the furniture to the fixtures and finishings, the details are kept to an extreme minimal. The spaces are serene and peaceful, making the view of the city and the landscape beyond an integral part of the architecture, making the architecture about rest. Images courtesy of Matsuyama Architect and Associates.


Los Angeles-based Building Block has yet again delivered a collection of bags that redefines functional pieces into an elegant minimalism. Looking back at their previous collections, the style has subtly evolved toward a more mature and luxurious direction. While the proportions and details of the bags reflect the modern day need for effortlessness and convenience, its materials, craft and finishings are classic. Slim portfolios, convertible clutches, laptop totes and even an iPhone sling carrier, all made from smooth black leather, I love how the collection continues to remain relevant to our lifestyles. Photography by Jennilee Marigomen.