Minimalissimo


Bronwyn Marshall

Undo one thing.

Korefe’s concept and design for The Deli Garage: L’eaundry is subtly bold concurrently. The luxury brand introduced the new range of luxury detergents that resonate scents of high-end boutique perfume houses. The notion to treat your second skin like your first is the crux of the line. The graphic design and packaging is a nod to this. Korefe is a multidisciplinary design firm based in Hamburg, Germany. Their body of work and expertise extends to areas of advertising, books, corporate design, corporate publishing, interior design, brand innovation and assistance with product development. L’eaundry is a beautifully considered product whose brand is reinforced by the integrated, and obvious, design integration. Available in both Figue pour Femme and Olibanum pour home, all of a sudden the arduous task of laundry doesn’t seem, or smell, so bad. Photography courtesy of Korefe.


Bernaskoni’s Arc is a bold and beautiful statement in the Russian landscape. Completed in 2012 and standing at 72 sqm, it is built on the border between forest and field and is a hybrid that performs several functions. As is a traditional statement of entry, through the presence of an arch or gate, Arc stands as a somewhat nod to that nostalgia. Spatially, Arc is a spiral staircase that includes a portal, an observation deck, a bar and also a well within. Within the sculpture, there exists an artist’s room, that every year the room is transformed into an art installation. Bernaskoni’s intention, being contextually sensitive, was to minimize waste as key. Arc is therefore comprised of a series of six-meter length boards where all off-cuts have been reused on site as structural elements which is then painted black. This Russian beauty is a sensitive and considered addition to the portal transitioning the structured human-worked landscape into the wild, untamed one. Photography courtesy of Bernaskoni and Yuri Palmin.


Jil Sander’s 2015 Resort collection is one heavily influenced by themes of movement. The pieces themselves, the cuts and the execution seem to mirror the flurry of design movement of the label. Staying true to the minimalist principles of the label, the collection is a synergy of crisp shapes that appeared to have liquid coursing through them and know constructions that create volume in simple jackets. There is an overt influence of versatility. The label, once described as the queen of less, despite said movements, has maintained its clarity and modern classic appeal. Timeless in its approach, Jil Sander has continued to show a dedication to tailoring and focus in the Resort 2015 collection. There is an effortless to each piece, curating an assemblage of want. I for one, am wanting of that timeless want. Photography courtesy of Jil Sander.


Frederico Traverso’s Pandora is a multiuse minimalist collection of lamps, tables and seating ornaments. Based on the philosophy of concealing the material composing them, each piece seems to have its own ethereal quality and lightness. Each piece is available in multiple sizes and when selected as the lighted version, each piece can be transformed into a feature lighting element. The illumination comes from LED technology and controlled through a remote device to ensure the sculptural piece itself is formally left uninterrupted. Available through Myyour, the collection is based on timeless design with hundreds of possible color combinations. Each element can be used internally or externally, maximizing its use and versatility also. There are 3 available sizes and each can be finished with either embossed detailing a smooth surface. Together in form and function, these pieces are beautiful and unobtrusive. And that is very beautiful. Photography courtesy of Frederico Traverso.


Swedish designer Thomas Sandell celebrates the beauty of marble with his Melt Bookcase. Originally from Finland, his architectural and design background has found him responsible for numerous subtle minimalist industrial design pieces. The piece was produced for the Marsotto Edizioni collection, and is made from white carrara marble, with a matt polished finish. The piece is also available in a black marble, and measures 70cm x 37cm x 90cm high. Since graduating with his Masters in Architecture, Sandell has been challenging the conventional design business model. His work includes several acclaimed interiors, contributing to a portfolio of commercial and residential work with gusto. His industrial pieces have also seen mass acclaim throughout Europe, and rightly so, together with a healthy body of international published work. Photography courtesy of Miro Zagnoli.


The Stickbulb collection from RUX brings the ability to customize lamps to the masses. And customize in a seriously slick way. Co-founded in 2012 by Russell Greenberg and Christopher Beardsley, RUX is a fusion of minimal lines, inter-connective elements and where the design of the object is in the hands of the end user. I think this is ingenious. The resulting aesthetic is also nothing short of beautiful. The collection is a combination of pendants, wall scones, table lamps and floor lamps. The primary design philosophy of the range is that it is a pure and minimal expression. I couldn’t agree more. The construction of each lighting option is a sleek wooden beam, available in varying lengths. Interchangeable connector pieces allows for multiple sticks to be placed together, to create a feature, or to attach to walls, and to illuminate any space. The wood used is reclaimed and sustainably sourced and is coupled with efficient LED technology. The collection was designed with the least number of parts possible with connections that make the pieces easy to separate for maintenance, recycling, or reuse. These are seriously note-worthy. Available from Rux. Photography courtesy of Rux.


Mathias Hahn as part of London’s Clerkenwell Design Week has introduced the Runcible Collection. Made from solid hard maple, the collection represents a familiar archetype, that is not limited to one specific task and are blanks that stand for a type of application but allow for individual use. Each piece is an implement for use in the home, but the exact functionality is diffused by experimenting with the expected aesthetic and form of such products, leaving them highly interpretive by the user. Hahn is an industrial designer, originally from Germany, and currently working in London where he started up his studio OKAYStudio in 2006. He studied both Industrial Design and Product Design, which has brought him to a body of work involving furniture, lighting and products. He has a natural desire for designing towards use and functionality and introduces me experimental curiosity to his way of working. Through his collaborations, commissioned and individual work, Hahn has remained dedicated to the minimalist principles and themes. The resulting Runcible Collection is testament to his dedication. There is a sophisticated simplicity to the way that he approaches materiality and the production process of remaining true to the materials core beauty. Photography courtesy of...


Case Scenario’s Element iPhone 5 case is a minimalist dream. Made from plastic the intended aesthetic is to infer a marble stone finish. Available in both a black and white version, this piece is sleek but strong and timeless and elegant. Case Scenario are based on Monaco and create mobile accessories with functionality, design and style in mind with an emphasis on designing and collaborating for the European market, with particular detail to technology. The Element case, is clear testament to that. With the clean lines of the iPhone, it seems almost hypocritical to then adorn it with a contrasting case, which is too often the case. This piece is both well designed and thoughtful. Too rare is to find such a fitting iPhone accompaniment. Congrats to Case Scenario for this. Congrats. Photography courtesy of Case Scenario.


Amelie Riech’s Uncommon Matters series is a striking collection of idealistic future lines. The pieces are based on simplified geometric forms that supplement the users own style, using subtlety and an understated design philosophy. There is also a strong connection to the enduring craft techniques of the past with the construction of the pieces being well considered and constructed with exemplarily quality. Reich is based between both Berlin and Paris and her work is said to reflect a luminous energy that is reflected by the sleek, fluid surfaces of the pieces. There is also a timeless and sensuous manner to the way in which light interacts with the elements through movement. See list of stockists for all available pieces. Photography courtesy of Matthias Wingartner


Studio de Materia’s Light Soil V2 is a beautiful fusion of clean lines. The intersecting elements seem to float and hold one another, but in a way that oozes effortlessness. The use of the natural shape of the terrain by placing the garage on the street level helps separate and delineate functionality of the spaces. Situated in Poznan, Poland, the use of concrete, glass and wood are so well integrated that the resulting architecture seems almost soft. The lack of clutter and nod to the surrounding landscape are both subtle and contextually sensitive. Studio de Materia has combined a clear technical knowledge base with a minimalist aesthetic that compliments the context and adds clear value to the aesthetic appreciation-ist. Photography courtesy of Rzemioslo Architektoniczne.


Camilla and Marc’s SS 2014 collection embodies what their brand has always preached; flattering silhouettes, clean lines, keen attention to detail. The collection sees a fusion of strong lines, draping and a restrained palette. The resulting pieces embody minimalism to a tee and are fresh beautiful adornments. They can’t help but entice mass envy. Based in Australia and built on a contemporary and effortlessly elegant philosophy, their portfolio is nothing short of handsome. Since their launch in 2003, Camilla and Marc have headed innovation in luxury Australian women’s fashion. The brother and sister duo’s passion for working with quality textiles and couturier techniques such as draping have seen them hold their own. SS 2014 is a curation of beautiful, considered and texturally opulent pieces. Knowing them is a must. Photography courtesy of Camilla and Marc.


Rene Schwolow’s Units of Time assembles as a triage of time telling line work. Made of powder-coated aluminum, the series of time telling devices are intended as a series of wall clocks with continuous sweeping elements. German-based designer, Schwolow is playing with time and its ephemeral nature through form. She plays with the idea of time being a notion that exists through the physical manifestation of its present through the clock. Units of Time discusses the subject of experience and perishability of time, as well as its apparent non-existence. Each piece of the series shows one element of time; hour, minute and second. Schwowlow is pushing the boundaries of our conceived notions through the simplification of something that truly has the power to control our actions. Through this simplification and stripped back motion, perhaps she is also asking us to see the beauty in time also; piece by piece. Photography courtesy of Rene Schwolow.