Minimalissimo


Bronwyn Marshall

Undo one thing.

Agata Bieleń’s collaboration with Mosses Lichen sees the launch of a nature inspired line. The Nature Line Collection is, as the name suggests, mused by nature and the organic and seamless lines that result. Available in a sterling silver finish, all pieces are subtle lines of irregularly shaped geometries for adornment. The feint and light-weightedness of the collection is typical of Bieleń, and her style, and this collection is no exception. This collection sees a launch from her traditional, more rigid geometries and sees her exploring natural materials and fauna as inspiration. Based in Poland, the emphasis is on round and soft forms which opposes her traditional style. Inspired by water lilies floating on the pond surface and spreading aquatic circles, organic and light objects adapt to the part of the female body discreetly emphasizing their shape and beauty. Handcrafted and playing on the cross-over of modernity and natural form, this collection is a beautiful addition. Photography courtesy of Marta Zgierska, Michał Matejko and Mchy Porosty.


Nissa Kinjalina’s Living Light is an interesting play on form and function. Each piece is conceived on the idea of having poured the light into the frame. The resulting forms embody a still in time almost, and the illuminated elements act as floating forms in a curated fusion of geometric lines. Available in three varying sizes and slightly varied shapes, the series can be arranged in infinite ways spatially. The light that is created from these pieces provides a constant mass of illumination across the pieces as they provide light. The idea is that each piece can be easily transported in the spaces that they are placed, is also uniquely considered by the designer. The light element is encased in the lower part from different sides with a thin matte acrylic and this creates a housing for transport and reconfiguration. Combining innovation and pushing the ideas of what lighting can do and add to our spaces, Kinjalina is one to watch. Photography courtesy of Nissa Kinjalina.


Inkster Maken’s Eclipse Wall Light epitomises what combined tradition, method and passion can spawn. Hailing from South Australia, the vision and hands behind the label, draws from designer Hugh Altschwager’s background and rural upbringing to create a beautiful collection of hand-made illumination pieces. The Eclipse Wall Light is a wall sconce light made from locally sourced limestone, measuring 275mm in diameter and 150mm deep. Altschwager notes both Nordic local influences to his work, with regard to using traditional methods and local materials to refinement. Altschwager’s background in architecture and construction project management saw him recognise an opportunity in a bespoke niche market. Inkster Maken, conceived in 2013 was intended to utilise totally locally sourced natural unprocessed materials to create long lasting products with a timeless northern European aesthetic. All pieces of the collection are made to order, based on demand, and are designed and hand-crafted in Melbourne, Victoria. The Eclipse Wall Light and the overt attention to detail and nod to tradition, are to be revered. Photography courtesy of Inkster Maken.


Roderick’s Analog Watch is a refined and light-weight timepiece. Currently existing as a concept design only, and not yet in production, this piece is conceived on the idea of simplifying the stereotypical form of the analogue watch as much as possible while retaining its functionality and ease of use. Purposely designed in a way that has a sense of transparency of form and a physical connectedness to the user, through wear there is a unique and differentiated formal quality. The hands of the watch are attached to the circumference thus enabling it (the face) to be hollow. The way in which it opposes traditional formal expectations, the design takes the idea of its minimalist rhetoric to another level. Designed to be unisex and non-identifiable on a gender level is not a new approach, but in this case, creates an opportunity for a differing aesthetic based on its wearer; adding another level of identity. In a market where the analogue is in direct competition with the emerging wearables market, creates a sense of differentiated value is essential. This is a very clever nod. Photography courtesy of Roderick/TokyoFlash.


Public School’s Resort 2016 collection is a strong statement of forms and lines. Collating as a collection of black, white, silver and grey, Resort 2016 explores a street style that imbues a level of embedded sophistication. Formally, the tailoring is well considered, together with relaxed cuts, this collection is one of cool cred. Based out of New York City, designers Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne created the label Public School based on a strong lineage of refined simplicity. Their work is renowned for its lines being clean, urban ones with an emphasis on accessibility to the American and in particular, New York style. Each piece is a considered fusion of cut and discipline. Watch this space. Photography courtesy of Public School.


Xirel Segard’s Galalux Lamp is a floating sphere of concrete lux and a creative approach to illumination. Made from concrete and available in two varying sizes, the magical orb of light is both a sculptural and functional addition to space. The thin sliver of exposed light that seeps from the center of the sphere acts as the functional injection into an otherwise geometric form. Although it seems to levitate with this streak of light passing through it, the materiality itself helps ground the object to the space. Based in Paris, Segard has been involved in numerous exhibitions and the recipient of many awards. Weighing in around 3kgs, the Galalux is one of many of her experimentations with concrete. Her work is articulated form-wise with a somewhat lightness, somehow due to the aeration of the concrete itself, but there also exists this a duality and juxtaposition, through the material’s strength. This experimentation and playfulness has given birth to this beautiful piece of industrial design that subtly illuminates and just as subtly adds a sense of curiosity. Photography courtesy of Xirel Segard.


London-based Fourfoursixsix’s Villa Mörtnäs combines considered Scandinavian style together with abounding contextual deliberation. Designed over three levels, the minimal formality of this villa clearly helps define a lineation of spaces within. Each floor plays its own, almost completely differing, function from the next. Entering at ground level is support space, which is submerged into the landscape and acts as the private entrance to the house. Ascending upward, the first level then houses the areas for rest and sleep, with the remaining living spaces on the upper most level, all accessed through stairs. The intentional vistas throughout, the regular and purposed window locations, create selected key apertures revealing the view. The living areas have been placed at the top of the building in order to enhance sunlight. There is also a notable differentiated volume in height between the floors. The living spaces almost seem to be double in volume, compared to the other levels. The intention is to amplify the light accessibility into the spaces. Completed in 2014, the arrangement on site of the villa to be facing the sea helps create a connection to the landscape beyond. The materiality of concrete, glass, oak and a muted palette, creates a sense...


Yiannis Ghikas’ Game of Trust Hanger is designed based on three interlocking, leaning elements. The Game of Trust itself is one based on trusting your partner, and falling into a position of support, reinforcing the strength of the connection. This Hanger plays up to this notion. Available in a number of painted or natural finishes, from solid wood, due to its composition, the piece is also modular in nature. Based out of Athens, Greece, Ghikas designed this piece based on three identical Y-shaped elements, each one supports and at the same time is supported by one of the others, resulting in an embrace that transformed the units into a unity. This in itself, the minimal composition of its elements, is beautiful. Photography courtesy of Nikos Alexopoulos.


WayPoint’s Libra Lights are a beautiful symphony of converging illuminated lines. Designed by Sara Ferarri Design, and based in Italy, these lights combine for a sculptural feature and seamless lighting element. Each piece is not constrained by another, and as such, there is a fragility to their configuration; a feeling of movement. Each piece, if hung in a collaboration, hangs independently, therefore creating its own dialogue with the other pieces. Available in a brass, gold and polished silver finish, these Libra Lights are a handsome play on lines. Each module stays in balance thanks to weight forces hidden in their own shape and create interesting shapes in space. As part of the WayPoint Atelier collection, these lights result in sculptures of light in midair. Their minimal and lighted-ness add considerable value to any space. Photography courtesy of Federico Marin.


The Boyscouts’ Parallel Circuit collection is one of curated lines and geometries. Based in the Netherlands, the label is founded on the philosophy of survival of the finest with an emphasis on quality; overtly obvious. Parallel Circuit is a line of varied neck, hand and finger adornments, varying in finish. Featured are the silver pieces, but each is also available in both a yellow and rose gold finish. The naming of the label The Boyscouts, has also been served the same level of level of discipline; where a nod to contemporary fashion meets the aesthetics and tradition of scouting is key. Extending to bags and accessories, the label is one that embodies minimalism through creating small subtle and considered gestures in design. Photography courtesy of Floor Knaapen.


Michael Anastassiades’ Mobile Chandelier 6 is a series of light-weight floating and balancing geometries. Each chandelier piece is comprised of black patinated brass, with mouth-blown opaline spheres for illumination and varying pendant rod lengths to order. The resulting forms are effortless and seem to engage in space with a unique lightness. Based in London, Anastassiades has collaborated and designed for FLOS, Lobmeyr and Svenskt Tenn, along with concentrating on the curation of his own signature pieces; a collection of lighting, furniture, jewellery, and tabletop objects. His philosophy of a continuous search for eclecticism, individuality, and timeless qualities in design is clear through his work, with an emphasis on the minimal and utilitarian. The Mobile Chandelier 6 series is a clear extension of this philosophy. Photography courtesy of Michael Anastassiades.


Beller’s Equal seating ensemble personifies minimalism, emphasizing a sense of delicate sensibility. The collection is a set of chairs and stools all made from retracting wood in a tight grip of a single, seamless piece of cast metal. The philosophy of the strength between the relationships between objects, and people, is the basis for material selection and composition. The ash wood and the cast aluminum stand as these opposites, united in the Equal chair. Norway-based Lars Beller Fjetland studied at the Bergen National Academy of the Arts focusing on furniture, interiors and lighting, and his Norwegian coastal roots are clearly overt in his work. It is typical of the beautiful Scandinavian tone of combined considered tradition, restrained form and impeccable and seamless detailing. Equal is the spawn of this fascination with detail and a timeless aesthetic. Photography courtesy of Magne Sandnes.