Minimalissimo


Bronwyn Marshall

Undo one thing.

Fifti-Fifti’s Spring coat rack brings light to an innovative means to hang adornments. Inspired by a traditional spring, the structure of this piece comprises a combination of white steel wire, a rod of beech wood and mounting mechanisms. The idea is that the piece hangs unobtrusively from any vertical plane. Due to the construction, the wardrobe appears obviously easy and is simultaneously very stable. Spring is available in various lengths with the option to adjust the length also. The structure of the hanging piece is based on a bar made from beech wood which is then pushed through the still open spring turn. The result is a subtle and beautiful accent to a usually unwieldy mechanism. Photography courtesy of Fifti-Fifti.


The Protagonist’s latest, Collection No.4, is a crisp and clean addition to the portfolio. Based in New York City, the label is mused by the ideal to elevate the modern wardrobe. There are nuances of traditional tailoring and subtleties of form, fit and fabrication that add depth beyond form to each of the pieces. The collection sees a line of monochromatic shapes for women, emphasizing minimally-shaped profiles. There is an obvious and overt emphasis on the classic and structured, which is brought forward through tapping into current shapes. This unique balance of restraint and distinction results in refined silhouettes that evolve from season to season. The Protagonist is a creative, with determination, to watch. Photography courtesy of Matthew Sprout.


L & G Studio’s sculptural salt and pepper Cylinder Shakers are outstanding. Formally and functionally, they are a streamlined, sleek and glistening beacon to what they essentially stand to represent, the adding of a nuance to a situation; the culinary situation. Seattle-based Ladies & Gentlemen Studio is founded by Dylan Davis and Jean Lee and explores playful explorations in materiality where they blend their resourceful curiosity with the desire to find unexpected pairings. Available in Brass, Copper and Aluminum, these stealth pieces are 1.25” diameter and 3.25” tall. Since L & G Studio’s inception in 2010, their curated collection is one to watch. These pieces, being no exception. Their ever-evolving set of ideas and experiments collected from their everyday discoveries, explorations and surroundings should inspire and excite. Photography courtesy of L & G Studio.


Eunhyuk Choi’s Deconstruction series of hand pieces are minimalist adornment at its best. Based in London, Choi is a jeweler, maker, designer and artist. His work is an intriguing portfolio of silversmithing at its best, and his techniques are most explorative. His pieces include rings, neckpieces, bracelets and tableware. Originally from Korea, his background and reference to rituals and traditions is clear and beautifully executed. Deconstruction sees a series of simplified lines brought together with the cleanest and well-articulated goldsmithing techniques. The seams are ironically, seamless. This is beautiful. These pieces add an element of sophistication to the wearer; a sculptural and understated statement. Eunhyuk Choi is emerging, and definitely worth following. Photography courtesy of Eunhyuk Choi.


Simon Legald’s Pocket for Normann Copenhagen adds a niche, literally, to any space. Made from Polypropylene, available in six colours, these pockets add an element of storage that goes beyond the traditional. Purposely designed to not add any unnecessary details, these are Scandinavian chic. There is an over emphasis on the function, with a streamlined and uncluttered aesthetic. Designed to be dishwasher safe, the mounting bracket is completely hidden once the Pocket organiser has been mounted. At Normann Copenhagen, they love to challenge the design rules and find traditional materials put into untraditional use. The Pocket is no exception; it is a celebration of these values. Photography courtesy of Normann Copenhagen.


Merryn Kelly has leaped out on her own to create fashion child, Third Form. The collection is one of overt sophistication, minimalism and once that embraces fresh cuts and understated tailoring. The nuances in detailing and designed accessories are a nice touch. The palette is one of crisp and bold definition; one that is strictly monochromatic. There is an obvious intentionality with the versatility of the pieces with a focus on fit, form and functionality. Heralding from Sydney, Kelly’s portfolio consists of working alongside some of Australia’s fashion finest. Labels such as Zimmerman and Lee Jeans have been the foundations from which her label grew. Her dedication to her brand is strengthened through her blog, Zine, which draws on her inspiration and musings. There seems to be a perfect balance between street style and femininity, which is beautifully curated. Photography courtesy of Jake Terrey.


The Zorro by Stephanie Knust, brings new meaning to linear illumination. This piece is a beautiful composition of bent metal and the latest in illumination technology combined. The lines, or one line, of this piece are just exquisite. Seamlessly bringing together the function and form of the industrial piece, this would be a very welcome piece in any living space, adding to and creating a space. Stephanie Knust is based in Germany and her work is a collection of industrial design pieces, ranging from seating, lighting and other tabletop accessories. He work is both typically German and bolt of nature and this piece, the Zorro seems to fit within this portfolio and also show a growth in her design aesthetic in a direction of a more refined form work. Zorro is reliant on its environment to interact with. It isn’t a self-standing object, which in a way is a creative way of engaging the objects that light the space, with the actual space. I appreciate the creativity. Photography courtesy of Stephanie Knust.


Poetic Lab’s Shadow Clock is an opposing composition of contractions. Subtle in size, when illuminated and in use, it transforms into a bold installation element. The Shadow Clock indicates the changing of time, through the use of light and reflection and refraction on the environmental issues to which it is installed; namely the wall. The pre-existing lighting therefore also plays a role in this expression of its function. London-based studio Poetic Lab, headed by Hanhsi Chen and Shikai Tseng, the collaboration has seen the joining of design philosophies, whereby the central spine of their design is that of poetry of objects and materials. Initially designed in 2012, this piece is 520mm high and 400mm in depth from the fixed surface, the Shadow Clock is made from Aluminium Alloy and stainless steel. Its interaction and dependency on its environment is particularly engaging. While the nod to the traditional sundial clock is obvious, this interpretation is very much welcomed. Photography courtesy of Poetic Lab.


VOWEL‘s new Octa collection is one that interweaves found materials, whereby a new value becomes redefined. VOWEL is a collaborative effort of duo Beau Bertens and Eline Ceelen where their design philosophy is based on creating an archive of projects that balance on the border between art and design. Based in the Netherlands, their work is founded on archaeological, scientific and philosophical discoveries, together with reimagining their next lives. Octa is primarily a jewelry collection, which an overt emphasis on neck adornment. The series sees the repurposing of existing used materials, and thus infuse a new meaning to their function, through form expression. The palette is minimal and the resulting forms are streamlined and beautiful. This is a limited collection, and is available through their site. Photography courtesy of Benjamin van Witsen.


Fran Corvi’s suitably names Corvi Wine Cooler takes cool to another level. Made from concrete, and moulded in a geometric form-mould, the result is one to match the most deserving of palettes. Each cooler can be stacked in an infinite array of designs to create a personalized wine cellar, and therefore pushes the boundaries of the expected formwork of the utilitarian object. Based on Argentina, Corvi’s inspiration is deriven from this background, where the wine cooler is a piece of me, my roots and my life where it also stands as a status symbol. His material choice seems to match said intent of stature. The geometric form of the Wine Cooler is said to comprise a series of sharp planes that offer a refined interpretation of the facets of a gem which also functionally double as the connecting platform element also. Photography courtesy of and available through Intoconcrete.


Normann Copenhagen’s Bell Lamp is a luminous nod to industrial design. Available in four sizes and two color combinations, the lamp is both a sculpturally beautiful and functionally present piece. At the core of its design, is its simplicity. Made from aluminium and hanging from a 4m textile cord, the Bell Lamp is encompassing of the designer’s passion, to challenge the conventional design rules. Designers Andreas Lund and Jacob Rudbeck believe their designs should be based on passing on the Scandinavian design tradition and create everyday objects that have personality without being loud. A statement that speaks worlds. Based in Copenhagen, the duo are responsible for envisioning carefully articulated designs that add character and emphasize quality and stripped back minimalist thinking. The Bell Lamp is testament to that. Photography courtesy of Normann Copenhagen.


Czech duo Vrtiska Zak introduces their interpretation of minimal children’s toys, in the shape of their WOO Collection. The series represents transportation, on a very basic level, which is manifested in the resulting minimal forms. The simplicity of the materiality and its composition is both beautiful and streamlined for ease of use also. Made from bent veneer and varnished wood, there is an emphasis on symbolizing three natural elements (water — the sailboat, air — the airplane and ground — the bulldozer). WOO itself is intended to represent an injection of motion, interjection of amazement while also being a nod to the wood that comprises the pieces also. Vrtiska Zak is the combined brainchild of Roman Vrtiska and Vladimir Zak, who met during their studies and later formed a partnership during their internships at Alvar Alto University in Helsinki, Finland. Their work is an encompassment of product design, architecture and graphic design disciplines. With resulting forms such as WOO, they are a solid contender in the design realm. Photography courtesy of Vrtiska Zak.