Minimalissimo


Bronwyn Marshall

Undo one thing.

Beller’s Equal seating ensemble personifies minimalism, emphasizing a sense of delicate sensibility. The collection is a set of chairs and stools all made from retracting wood in a tight grip of a single, seamless piece of cast metal. The philosophy of the strength between the relationships between objects, and people, is the basis for material selection and composition. The ash wood and the cast aluminum stand as these opposites, united in the Equal chair. Norway-based Lars Beller Fjetland studied at the Bergen National Academy of the Arts focusing on furniture, interiors and lighting, and his Norwegian coastal roots are clearly overt in his work. It is typical of the beautiful Scandinavian tone of combined considered tradition, restrained form and impeccable and seamless detailing. Equal is the spawn of this fascination with detail and a timeless aesthetic. Photography courtesy of Magne Sandnes.


AÃRK Collective’s timepiece range is a fusion of tradition and precision. Each piece uses Swiss and Japanese Quartz movements and hand-dipped casings and soft Horween leather straps. The Eclipse is the epitome of this balance and discipline. Inspired by time and the duality of night and day through the dual-tones of materiality and formal placement. The simple, contrasting dial evokes the moon’s movement in relation to the earth and the sun. Based in Melbourne, Australia, AÃRK Collective sees a collaboration of four creative aligned by family and a love of design. Emphasizing the need for quality and considered pieces has meant the resulting design is the uncomplicated and imbues minimalism. There is a simplicity in the undoing, and the careful placement of elements coming together. AÃRK Collective put as much thought into the parts that most people won’t see, and the result is beautiful. Photography courtesy AÃRK Collective.


Mifune Design Studio’s Y-Hangers piece sits as a light-weight functional sculpture. The single-framed metal arm bends to create multiple hanging locations vertically. The hangers themselves are also designed, specifically, for loading the coat rack with numerous items, seamlessly, and consistently. And when not in use, the hangers sit flat, aligned with the metal, painted base. The overall result is one of clear thin lines that quietly add to a space, without dominating it. Which is beautiful. Mifune is headed by Yasutoshi Mifune, who was born in Tattori and now resides in Osaka where the studio is located. He acquired knowledge about design through self-education while working at a few architectural design offices and interior design companies. Following this, he set up his own studio that encompasses design that is true to Japanese design with regard to beauty and spirituality. Photography courtesy of Mifune Design Studio.


Ando Corporation’s Rooms project is a submerged Japanese house set into hillside, peaking out over the ocean. This minimalist series of volumes that all seem to play cooperatively together in the landscape, are a stark and beautiful contrast to the coastal terrain. At nearing 290 sqm, Rooms is a modest nod to the Japanese lifestyle; discreet, contained and respectful. Each volume of white plaster seems to come together seamlessly through a series of walkways and terraces, to create this unassuming sanctuary, nestled in the sloping elevation. The site’s location is optimally primed to maximize on the incredible Pacific Oceanic aspect. Fenestration is purposely restrained to not be full-height, to frame views and to leave some of the unknown, unknown. Set in Wakayama, Japan the clean white plastered forms contrast the natural site, while playful formal landscape geometry engages in nuances and details throughout. Rooms is the epitome of what residential dwellings should aspire to be, a sanctuary; a closing of the door to the chaos, and an opening to the beyond (in this case, the limitlessness of the ocean beyond). Ando Corporation has created an incredible example of reflective architecture, celebrating minimalism. Photography courtesy of Kimikazu Tomizawa.


Swedish designer Malin Henningsson brings a minimal curation of brass lines, marble and perspex. Founded in 2013, Henningsson’s jewelry collection brings together a curiosity in form, through materiality and line work. The combination of the natural, untamed and unaltered marble pieces with the smooth lines of the gold-plated brass elements, sees a collection of necklaces, bracelets and rings that adorn with an inquisitiveness. Described as wearable sculpture, the basis of this Collection is to express a devotion to craftsmanship with a renewal as key. The basis of the design is shaped around utilizing and pushing boundaries with regard to shape and the way in which materials are incorporated and combined. Hand-crafted in Stockholm, this collection is an ode to traditional formwork, but contrasts with the composition of its elements. Henningsson is one to watch. Photography courtesy of Malin Henningsson.


Josh Goot’s AW 2015 Collection is a synchronized follow on from his minimalist aesthetic. The collection is mused by his trademark clean, crisp lines, bold color blocking and overall accessibility. There is a timelessness that he exudes through his work, through his pieces that make them classic, fused with edgy tailoring. This collection is the epitome of this, playing with texture, tailored shapes, cutouts and silhouettes. Based in Sydney, with boutiques in both Melbourne and Sydney, Goot is known for this contemporary fresh aesthetic, minimal palette and as someone who is pushing boundaries with shapes, in subtle ways. Heavily influenced by his upbringing surrounded by film, music and fashion, his work as a designer became his way to talk to people. He has won numerous awards, nationally and internationally and is growing in exposure as a result. His work is on the rise, and rightly so. Photography courtesy of Josh Goot.


Elise Rijnberg’s Piattona sees a seamless curated culinary assemblage brought to life. Originally designed as a prototype, this beautifully minimalist set is a response to the hurried thoughtless consumption of our frazzled times and seeks to get people to relax and take time to enjoy their food. The streamlined silverware set has a series of strong lines that simplify and force the user to engage in another way, to the act of using the items; and consequently to the act of eating itself. Based in Eindhoven in the Netherlands, Rijnberg is a freelance photographer, food stylist and designer. Her work is inspired out of her travels and engagement with culinary diversity. The name Piattona was originally introduced by Pellegrino referring to cutting the food without haste and chewing it slowly. This prototype collection challenges the user and changes the experience. Photography courtesy of Elise Rijnberg.


Dish 60 by Minimalux is a seductive and sophisticated gesture to the professional desktop. Amid the gadgets of interconnectedness, this piece sits as a sculptural nuance. Made with a stainless steel base and from solid brass, mirror polished by hand and electroplated in black nickel, this bowl is beautifully crafted. Also available in a plain, non-plated brass finish, this 60mm x 30mm piece is available through Leibal. The Liebal Store is a place of curated items focused on quality, minimalism and functionality. Dish 60 is no exception. Photography courtesy of Liebal Store.


Fifti-Fifti’s Spring coat rack brings light to an innovative means to hang adornments. Inspired by a traditional spring, the structure of this piece comprises a combination of white steel wire, a rod of beech wood and mounting mechanisms. The idea is that the piece hangs unobtrusively from any vertical plane. Due to the construction, the wardrobe appears obviously easy and is simultaneously very stable. Spring is available in various lengths with the option to adjust the length also. The structure of the hanging piece is based on a bar made from beech wood which is then pushed through the still open spring turn. The result is a subtle and beautiful accent to a usually unwieldy mechanism. Photography courtesy of Fifti-Fifti.


The Protagonist’s latest, Collection No.4, is a crisp and clean addition to the portfolio. Based in New York City, the label is mused by the ideal to elevate the modern wardrobe. There are nuances of traditional tailoring and subtleties of form, fit and fabrication that add depth beyond form to each of the pieces. The collection sees a line of monochromatic shapes for women, emphasizing minimally-shaped profiles. There is an obvious and overt emphasis on the classic and structured, which is brought forward through tapping into current shapes. This unique balance of restraint and distinction results in refined silhouettes that evolve from season to season. The Protagonist is a creative, with determination, to watch. Photography courtesy of Matthew Sprout.


L & G Studio’s sculptural salt and pepper Cylinder Shakers are outstanding. Formally and functionally, they are a streamlined, sleek and glistening beacon to what they essentially stand to represent, the adding of a nuance to a situation; the culinary situation. Seattle-based Ladies & Gentlemen Studio is founded by Dylan Davis and Jean Lee and explores playful explorations in materiality where they blend their resourceful curiosity with the desire to find unexpected pairings. Available in Brass, Copper and Aluminum, these stealth pieces are 1.25” diameter and 3.25” tall. Since L & G Studio’s inception in 2010, their curated collection is one to watch. These pieces, being no exception. Their ever-evolving set of ideas and experiments collected from their everyday discoveries, explorations and surroundings should inspire and excite. Photography courtesy of L & G Studio.


Eunhyuk Choi’s Deconstruction series of hand pieces are minimalist adornment at its best. Based in London, Choi is a jeweler, maker, designer and artist. His work is an intriguing portfolio of silversmithing at its best, and his techniques are most explorative. His pieces include rings, neckpieces, bracelets and tableware. Originally from Korea, his background and reference to rituals and traditions is clear and beautifully executed. Deconstruction sees a series of simplified lines brought together with the cleanest and well-articulated goldsmithing techniques. The seams are ironically, seamless. This is beautiful. These pieces add an element of sophistication to the wearer; a sculptural and understated statement. Eunhyuk Choi is emerging, and definitely worth following. Photography courtesy of Eunhyuk Choi.