Minimalissimo


Bronwyn Marshall

Undo one thing.

Ari Kanerva’s Tiuku Clock is a subtle and minimal take on the traditional grandfather style. His work is a dedication to minimalist details and to tirelessly researching functionality and ergonomics. His ethos is to make my design simple and functional, yet play with forms. There is a clear delineation from the formal and a strong divergence into design that emanates clarity of purposeful design. Function being key. Measuring 190cms in height, the Tiuku Clock transforms the conventional structure of the grandfather clock into the ideal urban representation of utility and consistency. Comprised of powder-coated sheet steel, it is available in four colour variations where the piece requires that it is mounted to the wall, but still remains in a subtle leaning-type stance. Born in Finland, with a background in Spatial and Furniture Design from the University of Art and Design Helsinki, Kanerva established his own design studio in 2010. His main focus is furniture and product design and he also assists companies with product design. The Tiuku Clock is just one of his many beautiful love children. Photography courtesy of Ari Kanerva and available through Covo and Luminaire.


Tony Smith’s current exhibition Forms through Matthew Marks Gallery is a testament to his life’s work. The series of space-enveloping forms are striking, bold and minimal. Tony’s iconic, geometric metal forms actual emerged in tandem with the burgeoning minimalist scene, and this exhibition is a nod to this dedication. Responsible for more than fifty large-scale sculptures in the final two decades of this life, his work as a contemporary of American art still stands relevant and as beautiful as ever. His works, in particular, the curation of Forms, highlights how art can have a transformative ability; that through art and sculpture, spaces and architectures can be created and changed. Smith’s work is described as contributing to the idea of reductionism that lies at the heart of minimalism. And that contribution is to be celebrated. His estate is handled through Matthew Marks Gallery.


Dedicated, disciplined and ridiculously handsome menswear label, SCTT BNDCTN is being released for order September 2014. The label has existed as an enigma in the fashion world since 2012 and had existed purely as a brand. Through various social media outlets to the tune of Tumblr, Facebook and Soundcloud; SCTT BNDCTN has been an encompassment of sensory intrigue. That is until now. The intensely strong brand and clear dedication to adorning men is the work of its inceptionist and Master Tailor, Warren Harrison. Based in Melbourne, the pieces are a result of tireless precision. The influence of Japanese patternmaking, traditional tailoring and experimental design is obvious and fiercely beautiful. SCTT BNDCTN celebrates the male form through a methodical use of linen, wool, leather and cotton. The designer’s passion is clear. Although a rarity, this handcrafted menswear line for discerning, stoic types, is undoubtedly one to watch. And listen to. And be inspired by the mood it instills. There is a clarity and stillness to SCTT BNDCTN that should be celebrated. Photography by Jem Taylor and make-up by Nadja Mott.


Zeren Saglamer’s Grill is a beautiful combination of lines. The materiality and the expression of its composition, is beautiful. Described as a half solid surface and half cage-like table, this piece is available in both a carrara marble and wooden surface. The metal bands that accompany the solid surface also act as a hanging surface for reading material. Saglamer is located in Istanbul and has a background in Industrial Design and Fine Arts. Her works are a combination of furniture, industrial design products, interiors and lighting. She heads up XS Design studio with an ethos to create products and interiors that integrate form and function in harmony. Grill is available through Selectivism. Photography courtesy of XS Design.


Berlin-based Roomsafari has developed the ultimate in clothing accessories. Their Triangle Hanger is that said ultimate. Available in two finishes; silver aluminum and powder-coated black aluminum, this piece is simple, classic and designed to streamline storage. Inspired by the eponymous percussion instrument, this exceptionally minimal design features a hollow aluminum triangle, with an opening that replaces the hooks of conventional hangers. Designed by Christine Nogtev and Chul Cheong for Roomsafari, this piece is a beautiful and minimal statement of stripped-back functionality that also formally makes a bold statement. Available through Odetothings, this piece acts as the perfect silhouette. Photography courtesy of Odetothings.


Chunk by Andreas Engesvik for Menu, is a simple and beautiful vessel for illumination. Designed specifically for Menu, this piece is available in both a marble and raw concrete finish. Both incredible. They are finished with either metal or copper insets to house the candle, and can be purchased in three differing sizes. Designed so that as the candle burns, the light reflects in the copper giving a beautiful glow; perfect for dinner tables and window sills; an industrial yet romantic look. Originating from Norway, Andreas Engesvik’s body of work has been highly acclaimed and diverse, but always consistent and minimal. This piece is no exception. Standing both 35mm, 55mm and 75mm high, all S,M,L have a diameter of 75mm. Available through Menu, Chunk are sure to become timeless classics. Photography courtesy of Menu.


Spanish La Mamba Design Studio has re-visioned the conventional mirror. Their Mirrors collection, available through Omlette-ed, is a collection of understated beautiful lines and details manifested as a series of circular, vertical and horizontal standing mirrors. Comprised of a steel tubular frame, available in both black and white powder-coated metal finishes, these room adornments are the subtle dinner guest. The guests that everyone wants to know. La Mamba are based in Valencia, Spain and founded by designers Ommar Uribe, Pedro Rivera, and Raul Dura. Formally, these are unassuming, but the design and level of considered articulation of all elements is clear. These beauties stand at just over 1700mm high and are finished seamlessly with cork detailed legs. Nods to La Mamba. Photography courtesy of Omlette-ed.


Korefe’s concept and design for The Deli Garage: L’eaundry is subtly bold concurrently. The luxury brand introduced the new range of luxury detergents that resonate scents of high-end boutique perfume houses. The notion to treat your second skin like your first is the crux of the line. The graphic design and packaging is a nod to this. Korefe is a multidisciplinary design firm based in Hamburg, Germany. Their body of work and expertise extends to areas of advertising, books, corporate design, corporate publishing, interior design, brand innovation and assistance with product development. L’eaundry is a beautifully considered product whose brand is reinforced by the integrated, and obvious, design integration. Available in both Figue pour Femme and Olibanum pour home, all of a sudden the arduous task of laundry doesn’t seem, or smell, so bad. Photography courtesy of Korefe.


Bernaskoni’s Arc is a bold and beautiful statement in the Russian landscape. Completed in 2012 and standing at 72 sqm, it is built on the border between forest and field and is a hybrid that performs several functions. As is a traditional statement of entry, through the presence of an arch or gate, Arc stands as a somewhat nod to that nostalgia. Spatially, Arc is a spiral staircase that includes a portal, an observation deck, a bar and also a well within. Within the sculpture, there exists an artist’s room, that every year the room is transformed into an art installation. Bernaskoni’s intention, being contextually sensitive, was to minimize waste as key. Arc is therefore comprised of a series of six-meter length boards where all off-cuts have been reused on site as structural elements which is then painted black. This Russian beauty is a sensitive and considered addition to the portal transitioning the structured human-worked landscape into the wild, untamed one. Photography courtesy of Bernaskoni and Yuri Palmin.


Jil Sander’s 2015 Resort collection is one heavily influenced by themes of movement. The pieces themselves, the cuts and the execution seem to mirror the flurry of design movement of the label. Staying true to the minimalist principles of the label, the collection is a synergy of crisp shapes that appeared to have liquid coursing through them and know constructions that create volume in simple jackets. There is an overt influence of versatility. The label, once described as the queen of less, despite said movements, has maintained its clarity and modern classic appeal. Timeless in its approach, Jil Sander has continued to show a dedication to tailoring and focus in the Resort 2015 collection. There is an effortless to each piece, curating an assemblage of want. I for one, am wanting of that timeless want. Photography courtesy of Jil Sander.


Frederico Traverso’s Pandora is a multiuse minimalist collection of lamps, tables and seating ornaments. Based on the philosophy of concealing the material composing them, each piece seems to have its own ethereal quality and lightness. Each piece is available in multiple sizes and when selected as the lighted version, each piece can be transformed into a feature lighting element. The illumination comes from LED technology and controlled through a remote device to ensure the sculptural piece itself is formally left uninterrupted. Available through Myyour, the collection is based on timeless design with hundreds of possible color combinations. Each element can be used internally or externally, maximizing its use and versatility also. There are 3 available sizes and each can be finished with either embossed detailing a smooth surface. Together in form and function, these pieces are beautiful and unobtrusive. And that is very beautiful. Photography courtesy of Frederico Traverso.


Swedish designer Thomas Sandell celebrates the beauty of marble with his Melt Bookcase. Originally from Finland, his architectural and design background has found him responsible for numerous subtle minimalist industrial design pieces. The piece was produced for the Marsotto Edizioni collection, and is made from white carrara marble, with a matt polished finish. The piece is also available in a black marble, and measures 70cm x 37cm x 90cm high. Since graduating with his Masters in Architecture, Sandell has been challenging the conventional design business model. His work includes several acclaimed interiors, contributing to a portfolio of commercial and residential work with gusto. His industrial pieces have also seen mass acclaim throughout Europe, and rightly so, together with a healthy body of international published work. Photography courtesy of Miro Zagnoli.