Minimalissimo


Carl MH Barenbrug

Back to purity, back to simplicity.

We love our minimalistic storage solutions and when Thing Industries, a newly established creative studio, recently introduced the Indoor Stoop, it became a must-feature. Indoor Stoop is a high-functioning stoop for seating and storage. Featuring three soft-close drawers with peg board surfaces, the design works well in bedroom or living room corners for storage of clothes, books, or other household accessories. It could even be used as an extra seat or step-ladder. I like that. Measuring 19 inches wide x 24 inches high and 24 inches deep, the Indoor Stoop is not only a well designed, highly functional piece of furniture, it has a striking and sleek aesthetic.


Berlin based interior design studio Applied Object, founded by Dirk Rittberger in 2012, is dedicated to promoting furniture and objects conceived and created by various designers. With an eye on innovative and lightweight materials Applied Object aim to make furniture suited to mobile lifestyles known to blur the boundaries between home and work. Such furniture is the long board and short board wall shelves, which boast a beautifully minimalistic, functional and timeless design, suitable for almost every apartment, studio or house. This elegant wall shelf, made from a single folded sheet of aluminium composite, has been designed to hold books and CDs as well as crockery. Measuring 188 x 7 x 24cm and 94 x 7 x 24cm, the shelves are available to order through Berlin based store LOCAL. Photography courtesy of Simon Freund.


Japanese designer Tokujin Yoshioka continues to fascinate us with his simplicity in design and in particular his remarkably minimalistic work with glass furniture. His latest creation is the Prism glass chair for Glasitalia. Prism glass chair is a chair made from thick (19mm) high-transparency glass. With the cutting technique on the glass surface, it produces a clear sparkling effect like a prism. The glass is embellished with special bevelling which reflects and refracts the light, lending the object a rare preciousness. Despite its extreme lightness of form, the seat has considerable weight bearing capacity. Yoshioka writes: This creation is a chair like a shimmering sculpture in a space that miraculous expression is brought by the refraction of light. This chair may not exude comfort, but I’m full of admiration for Yoshioka’s work. Not only do his designs often have a beautiful minimalist aesthetic, but there is something wonderfully poetic about his work with glass.


Norway based designer and artist, Daniel Rybakken, has an outstanding portfolio of work that spreads installation, lighting and illumination creations. His latest — Compendium — a lamp family designed for Italian lighting company, Luceplan. Rybakken asked the question: How would you best illuminate a room with only one light source? To begin with, you would need a very strong light source, and secondly you would like to have it to come from the side, in the same manner as a window with natural light coming into the space. Thirdly, since you have this strong light source, you need to avoid glare, so you should try to diffuse and soften the light. These three aspects were the primary focus of the Compendium project. The lamp, made from extruded anodised aluminium, features a very strong LED light source directed towards the wall, and by doing this, a soft light reflects into the open space, creating a beautifully balanced illumination. The compendium family consists of a floor version with a freely rotatable stem and a suspended version, mountable either as an up or downward light. Photography by Kalle Sanner & Daniel Rybakken.


We recently caught up with Håndværk to discuss the brand, its designs, fabrics, and future. Describe your path to creating the brand, Håndværk. We felt there was a void in the market for a label that was solely dedicated to high-end essentials — crafting each piece from the finest fabrics, and focused on the details as the foundation to function. From the start, the ultimate goal was to create a label that we would love as customers, something that would make us proud. Our passion for fine fabrics was the main force driving Håndværk’s creation. Håndværk is an interesting & unusual brand name. Can you explain why you choose it? It is a Danish word that stands for artisanal, a trade, or handy-work. We felt it represents the soul of the label. At the core, we want to highlight that pride achieved by the craftsman with his honest work. We want to convey that making quality garments is a humble and tedious endeavour, miles away from the hype of the fashion world. We have always been huge fans of Danish design, specifically mid-century modern furniture — with the focus on simplicity, honest materials and function. These values influence how we go...


Danish design-house, Normann Copenhagen have expanded the award winning Geo range with six new products by Danish designer, Nicholai Wiig Hansen, which is characterised by its minimalistic style and sharp, masculine edges. The Geo Vacuum Jug is now being joined by a tray, milk jug, sugar bowl and lidded jars in three different sizes. Geo has a precise, geometric feel where all unnecessary details have been stripped away to create a stylistic design. Comprising of a lightweight plastic material with a glossy inside and a lovely mat finish on the outside, the whole Geo range fits beautifully together. Nicholai Wiig Hansen explains: The idea behind Geo was to make a range of products with character. I’ve worked with the lines, circles and shapes of the products to create a geometric harmony. The very shapes give the Geo range an edgy and graphic look, and the combined use of classic and light colours help to soften the masculine appearance. Wonderful work.


Swedish design studio, Form Us With Love, who’s incredible studio space in Stockholm we featured a few years ago, have recently designed this beautiful stool with clean-cut lines, interrupted by a recess that serves as a footrest, which brings to mind the cutting of a tree trunk, ‘fura’ in Swedish. Designed for Italian furniture and lighting brand, Plust, the Fura stool is matched with the Fura table, both of which express rational, clean and geometric forms. The Fura furniture, comprised of polyethylene, is available in a variety of colours that include white, rosemary, sandy, ashen, and pearl black. Brilliantly simple garden furniture.


Irene Noren — @irenenoren — is a Spanish stewardess and fashion blogger, based in Valencia. Today we catch up with Irene to take a closer look at her beautiful Instagram collection and incredible style, and how this collection has developed into a consistently minimalist aesthetic. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? I love the balance and harmony in minimalism. I adopt it to my lifestyle and in the way I dress, and that’s what I try to convey in the photos I capture. I also think that simplicity is the best way to live. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? My daily life is stressful enough, but I always look for that simplicity in the chaos in which our society lives — that’s what inspires me, finding the harmony in the chaos. When and how do you decide to take a photo? There is not always a good moment to capture a photo, but when I see something pure white for instance, such as a building or a piece of clothing, capturing that moment is a must. What is your favourite quote on minimalism? “Simplicity is complex. It’s never simple to keep things simple. Simple solutions require...


The Tumble Lamp or Tuimelled is another remarkable table and floor lamp design by renowned Dutch industrial designer Aldo van den Nieuwelaar. Originally designed in 1968 and re-produced by Dutch lighting brand Boops, in his honour, the tumble lamp is comprised of powder coated aluminium, an LED warm white lamp, featuring dimmer control, and is available in black and white. On his design work, Aldo van den Nieuwelaar wrote: My challenge is the experimentation with geometrical forms, which can be traced back to the work of modern visual artists such as Donald Judd and Jan Schoonhoven. It is precisely this successful experimentation with geometry that makes Aldo’s work so wonderfully appealing to those of us who appreciate minimalism, leaving an everlasting legacy of geometric abstraction and simplicity in design.


Swiss artist Zimoun, creator of exceptional minimalist sound installations, some of which you may already be familiar with, has recently introduced me to his latest work. As a collaboration with architect Hannes Zweifel, Zimoun installed 81 boxes between two levels of a room at the Mannheimer Kunstverein gallery in Germany. The boxes hang between floor and ceiling and can be seen from two different levels. 20 dc-motors are mounted and distributed along a handrail. When activated, they set the boxes in motion by means of thin nylon ropes connected vertically to the individual boxes, causing them to move with varying intensity and directions. Since the spaces between the boxes are small, the movement of one box affects neighbouring boxes, leading to a very complex overall performance of the suspension, which constantly changes and progresses. Zimoun explains: The collision of the boxes and the friction caused when they collide gives rise to a multitude of sounds and noises. The acoustic perspective changes as the viewer moves along the exhibition space and can be experienced in constantly new ways. Minimalist, ambient sound with wonderful visuals. Outstanding work. → Watch the 20 dc-motors, 81 cardboard boxes video


The late Dutch industrial designer and sculptor, Aldo van den Nieuwelaar, characterised by geometric abstraction, a systematic approach and a minimal use of image resources — consistently represents simplicity and clarity of form in his work, reducing the design of all his products to their very essence. When I discovered the quite wonderful and minimalistic Cirkellamp by Aldo van den Nieuwelaar, I was surprised it hadn’t already been featured here on Minimalissimo. Originally designed in 1968 and consisting of a perfectly proportioned circle and square, Cirkellamp was produced in 2010 in honour of the great designer by Dutch lighting brand, Boops. The lamp has been updated with modern technology and makes use of a stepless dim button by a pulse dimmer. Beautiful, elegant and masterfully minimalist. Expect to see a few more Aldo van den Nieuwelaar designs celebrated in the future.


Danish furniture manufacturer Askman, successfully collaborate with some of Denmark’s best contemporary designers. Along with their 100 years experience in woodworking — which offers the base foundation for all their products — Askman have produced these wonderfully minimal furniture pieces; Square, designed by Jørgen Møller. Having been designing for Askman for more than 25 years, Jørgen Møller has created a remarkable collection of elegant, functional and minimalistic products. His Square series is a brilliant example of his work, which includes a magazine holder, box, and a nest of tables. It’s the quiet simplicity and the one primary shape (square) used throughout these pieces that has the minimalist in me appreciating everything about Møller’s designs.