Minimalissimo


Categorized “Architecture & Interior design”

This two family dwelling is located in Minamikarasuyama, Tokyo. Atelier HAKO Architects formed the two homes in one building on a narrow plot. Concrete is the primary material used in this structure. A concrete facade ensures privacy for the dwelling while projecting a sleek and modern aesthetic. The pattern of dots on the concrete are a result of the fabrication process. In this home, however, they form a simple, lovely pattern on the exterior and interior walls. Louvered screens cover the large windows: they filter the light and create additional privacy for the residents. Each story of the building contains a home with all the necessities for a small family: bedrooms, bathrooms, and a main living area with kitchen. The interiors are divided by white walls that compliment the exposed concrete. Floating staircases lead to a glass-covered terrace on the upper story. Dwelling of Minamikarasuyama is an elegant solution for a multi-family home in a crowded city.


Nicolas Schuybroek Architects’ DT Appartment in Brussels, Belgium is a beautifully muted pallete of monochronism. The celebration of marble, stone and timber is harmonious and brings the spaces together effortlessly. Essentially posing the challenge of being a small apartment, NS Architects have managed to create a series of spaces that add a sense of warmth. The contrast in materiality throughout is well orchestrated and has a seeming natural feel. Named one of French Architectural Digest’s Best Interior Designers of 2013, Nicolas Schuybroek is beyond emerging. His career has spanned cross-continental borders having studied in Belgium, worked in Canada and continued collaborations across the two nations. His work is primarily high end residential, and is without a doubt, one to watch. Photography courtesy of Nicolas Schuybroek Architects.


This well-designed loft renovation delivers the perfect balance of existing and new features. Before the renovation, San Francisco Loft was an open 1,200 square foot space with a doug-fir structure and exposed brick. Line Office Architecture‘s smart renovation utilizes the existing features of the space while incorporating fresh new elements. The wooden structure of the loft has a strong visual affect: the beams and columns are complimented by the addition of a hardwood floor and wood accents on the furniture. Juxtaposing the wood is the dark black of the built-in furniture in the kitchen and bedroom. It isn’t easy to transform an open loft apartment into a space this cool and elegant. Many designs do too much or too little: they overpower the space or leave the viewer wanting more. This design suits the loft perfectly: it is sleek and modern but preserves the charm of the original space.


It think that the project of the award-winning Japanese architect Tadao Ando for Tom Ford’s ranch could not be more beautiful, with its modern, clean and minimalist lines and shapes throughout as well as the detail of the construction. The plain concrete walls are maybe the most characteristic of the project with the abrupt contrast of light, as well as the road on the small lake. It is located outside of Santa Fe, New Mexico, and has almost 100,000 square meter, being perfectly integrated with the arid lands of the state due to a rustic palette of colors.


Casa V is a redevelopment project by architecture team Dosis de Arquitectura of an existing house that was constructed in the early 1960s. A stunning volume of curved walls and stark white embody this holiday home for the owners for half a century. As the years went by, the growth of the family could not be contained in the original house hence the work to adapt and expand on the multi-generation, multi-purpose building. Casa V was already located on a breathtaking site in La Coruña, Spain. The structure is reminiscent of Corbusier’s nom de plume: A house is a machine for living in. Form follows function - it exists to serve its purpose of facilitating activities within and to experience the views of the landscape. The present architects have continued the legacy as they so eloquently describe it: Spaces are defined by the unfolding of matter in space-time, which topologically adapts itself to what happens inside. The new house is formalized by the continuous flow of a completely neutral wrap – no edges, no color, no texture – and, within this wrapping, life, action, is the protagonist. Dosis de Arquitectura have aligned the design language – the characteristics of the wrap and typography of the architecture - with...


Rainha House is designed by the Belgium based studio Atelier d’Architecture Bruno Erpicum, or ABBE for short. The small, rectangular structure is home to a family in Portugal. Glass and concrete are the primary materials used in this residence. Polished concrete can feel cold and sterile, but this is not the case with Rainha House. Hardwood floors and well-placed lighting add warmth to the space and balance the coolness of the concrete. The full length glass windows bring in sunlight and connect the home with the natural environment. I love the use of concrete in Rainha House. Exposed concrete is a pure and beautiful material; it elevates this home from a basic structure to a fine work of art. Rainha House is an elegant dwelling perfectly suited to its inhabitants and environment.


The layout of this industrial loft apartment in Brussels is quite simple. Interior FOR has few windows and no interior walls. Designed by adn Architecture, the defining features of the apartment are two freestanding metal towers. Accessed by thin, white staircases, these towers house the bathroom and laundry rooms on the ground floor, and the bedroom and office on the second story. The majority of furniture in the apartment is built-in, allowing the space to have a continuous flow and material palette. I love the simple functionality of this apartment. The towers are a smart way to add rooms and divide the space of an open plan apartment. The white walls and exposed concrete create a clean aesthetic that match the simple design of the floor plan. Interior FOR is a lovely and perfectly designed apartment.


This tranquil space is an assisted reproduction clinic, completed by Barcelona based designer Susanna Cots. The owners wanted to avoid sterile coldness of a hospital and put their clients at ease with a warm, welcoming atmosphere. At the same time, the interior had to look and feel professional and trustworthy. Here is how designer explains her concept: We have designed a space aimed to creating connections through sensitivity and emotions. In the project, the materialization of this bond to life is very visual. On one hand, the reception-waiting room has been created as one piece so that clients feel accompanied all the time. On the other, the corridor that connects this area with the consulting rooms has been projected as a great wooden cube slightly illuminated –again, looking for the roots in nature- that symbolizes the transition to life. The corridor is not the only feature that bears a double meaning. Nearly every element of this interior is symbolic. Two large oak trees, greeting customers at the entrance, represent strength and family values. And the minimalist whiteness of the place symbolizes purity and new beginnings.


Japanese designer Issey Miyake’s collaborations with the architects behind his spaces are always incredibly compatible with his distinctive creative direction. His most recent boutique is an extension by Tokujin Yoshioka who is also designed the original store. Known as a Reality Lab, this new retail project is supposed to emulate the shopping experience in a laboratory, which I suppose could be interpreted as the way things are organized in this clean, minimalist space. Designated areas have color blocks of blue and green, leaving the rest of the interiors mostly white with exposed, unfinished wooden joists and raw concrete walls. Products are organized according to color and sectioned by category (garments vs Bao Bao bags vs IN-EI lamps) while they are located in areas designed specifically for them. The details that caught my eye were how the functions of the store have been deliberately concealed. The hangers are hidden behind a deep cove so the clothes appear floating beneath a long color band; the cashier’s desk is devoid of any information and direction; mirrors are frameless and nondescript so they pretend to be an extension of the space. This retail project has a lot more depth and layers than it appears to be,...


It is rare to see a modern home with a conventional A-frame roof and wooden facade. Boreraig House, on the Scottish Isle of Skye, proves that chic and modern living can take many forms. Designed by Dualchas Architects, this home aims to connect with the landscape and local heritage. Boreraig House sits low on the skyline so as not to interrupt the stunning mountain views. Instead of adding space in height, Dualchas Architects created the structure in three connected bodies. The main block holds the kitchen, dining room, and lounge. The second space is for the bedrooms; and the third is a private study. The structure’s materials are derived from its surroundings: metal from the farm’s gates, lumber from the fence, and stone from the traditional property walls. I love the combination of modern and rustic in this humble home. The flush paneling and gray color of the wood modernize the facade. The corrugated metal does the same for the sleek roof. Overall, Boreraig House is a lovely, peaceful country dwelling.


House in Shimamoto is located in a busy residential neighborhood in Osaka, Japan. Container Design, based in Kobe, Japan, designed the simple home with the goal of connecting the residents with nature while maintaining privacy from near-by neighbors. The home is comprised of three basic materials: steel, glass, and timber. White galvanized steel plates cover the facade, protecting the retreat from the crowded street. On the north side of the home, large glass windows bring in natural light and offer a peak at the mountainous landscape. Timber is used throughout the interior: the ceiling and wall beams are exposed and the floor alternates between a solid and slatted wood pattern. I love the restricted use of materials in this home. The steel, glass, and wood feel complimentary yet still maintain an interesting contrast. House in Shimamoto is a no-fuss home that is sure to please anyone lucky enough to reside there.


Sekino Architects Office brings an absolute celebration of concrete to its combined House + Office structure in Tokyo. Staying true to the aesthetic that has become typified of Japanese architectural form, this structure is one of absolute minimalism. The clean lines and open voids acting as internal courtyards connect spaces through bridges and uninterrupted rail-work. Comprised of reinforced concrete and glass, House + Office sits on a site just over 800 sqm, providing a very generous, particularly for Japanese standards, 550 sqm of internal floor area. Both the House and Office components of this beauty seem to coexist in an effortless harmony. There is also an overt zen-ness to this space and the experience of moving throughout. This is an applauding example of Sekino Architects Office’s consistent discipline and restrained deliberation. Photography courtesy of Hiroyuki Hirai.