Minimalissimo


Categorized “Photography”

Sef Quemado — @sefquemado — is a visual artist from Manila, Philippines, and personal style blogger at Fashion + Bacon. Sef graduated from the University of Santo Tomas with a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts Major in Advertising Arts. We recently caught up with Sef to discuss her wonderful, fashion focused Instagram collection. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? I’m mainly inspired by the beauty in simple things. I’m also drawn to a minimalist approach to fashion and the clean lines in architecture. And I have this strange obsession with white walls and mental institutions. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? Visual clutter can be very distracting, so I always try to keep my work environment as organised as possible. A clear open space allows me to stay focused and helps my creative juices flow. I also find listening to music always lifts my mood and blocks out distractions. Other than that, I like to surround myself with the few people I enjoy, my six cats, and doing the things I love. When and how do you decide to take a photo? Whenever I see something that I find aesthetically pleasing and easy on the eye....


Los Angeles based photographer Nicholas Alan Cope, whose superb book, Whitewash, we featured last year, has again grabbed our attention with another superb photographic series, Vedas. A collaborative project with fellow photographer and designer Dustin Edward Arnold, Vedas — meaning knowledge in Sanskrit — marked their move into fashion imagery through photographing sculptural garments of their own design, and to challenge ideas of what is acceptable against what is possible. In a recent interview with Dezeen, Arnold explains: It was the idea that knowledge is at once both expansive and contractive. For some it shakes foundations, de-stabilises values and opens up the sheer terror of possibility. For others it signifies hope, advancement and discovery. The materials used for this project are flexible, yet manage to hold shape to achieve interesting structures with often blurred, ghostly silhouettes. I like this. We wanted to restrain the palette by focusing entirely on form rather than colour. I will certainly be keeping a watchful eye on this duo’s future collaborations. Fascinating.


You might be familiar with London-based photographer Bruno Drummond and set designer Gemma Tickle‘s work through their contribution to Printed Pages magazine’s spring 2014 edition, but the pair’s collaborations span many other playful projects. Very informed by a minimalist aesthetic, their collaborations often use graphic, formal arrangements, clean sharp angular lines, plain untextured surfaces, and as with Printed Pages, repeat the same elements again and again as a stylistic device. Continuing my on-going investigation about the process behind minimalistic work, Bruno shares with us that he wouldn’t necessarily describe their process as minimalist — It is often quiet elaborate, with ideas being discussed extensively but it does tend to result in a specific vision prior to shooting.  A lot of the work is pre-visualised with ideas, materials, colours and lighting discussed in advance, although they always leave room for the unexpected, which isn’t surprising considering the joyful nature of their work. Unsurprisingly, their individual portfolios boast several other beautifully simple projects — head over to be further visually delighted!


Hampus Hoh — @hampushoh — is a Swedish student and blogger at online magazine, Radar. Besides studying, Hampus works at a clothing store in his home town. He is also very passionate about arts and photography. And it is Hampus’s photography that we are excited to introduce to you today, gaining an interesting insight into how his stylish collection materialised. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? Minimalism is not only about what is essential, it is also about what is natural and untouched. I’m drawn to things that are raw and unedited by humans. This might not always seem the most minimal, but it is a significant part of my photography. I believe the common definition in most of my photos would be effortless and slightly off. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? Having lived in Scandinavia my whole life, I am by nature drawn to tranquil surroundings. A clear space often equals a clear mind to me, which is what I want when I really need focus. On the other hand, people, movement and noise can be very inspirational. When and how do you decide to take a photo? Whenever I see something that I...


Lucas Dias is a young Brazilian photographer and video-artist based in Barcelona who has recently opened the second show of his touring exhibition Cuerpos Urbanos (Urban Bodies). The series of double-exposures explores the limit between people and their surroundings — the skin of the body and the skin of the city — ultimately communicating the complexity of those relationships in an elegant, effortless manner. It is in the limit between body and landscape that the proposal for Urban Bodies is drawn. In an attempt of reenchantment with the world, diaphanous mirages are drawn, ethereal and subtle, provoking the observer’s eye. They reveal skins of transparent folds, and within the folds, invisible landscapes. With a background in Architecture studies, Lucas maintains the concept of ephemeral and diaphanous even in the exhibition design — the images were printed in large plates of transparent acetate, floating suspended in the air. Discussing the process behind his work, he reveals that Cuerpos Urbanos was the result of long and painful exploration, after many experiments and thoughts, confirming that a simple result is often the culmination of many iterations and hard work. Cuerpos Urbanos will be open at the aDa Gallery in Barcelona until the end of June...


Pablo Alzaga — @pabloalzaga — originally from San Sebastian, but currently based in Madrid studying Telecommunication Engineering, is also an incredibly talented freelance photographer. It is Pablo’s striking, minimalist work in photography, featured on Instagram, that we are delighted to share with you, along with an exclusive insight into the man behind the lens. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? I feel inspired by simplicity and straight lines in architecture and wide open spaces. Skateboarding and streetwear fashion are also an important part of my work, always through a refined point of view. And I have a little obsession: I’m fascinated by faraway people. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? As an engineer, it’s all about the connection between maths and visual arts, always looking for symmetry, proportions and new perspectives around me. White buildings, neat rooftops or lonely landscapes help spark my creativity. When and how do you decide to take a photo? I always try to make photos in high key conditions. Light is so important! Cloudy, grey days reveals the best spots of the city, so if the situation has little information for my eye, I shoot. What is your favourite quote on...


Photographer and science journalist Jean de Pomereu, fascinated by Antarctica’s enormous icebergs, has produced a beautifully bleak series of the icy continent titled, Sans Nom. The series, captured in 2008 at the fourth International Polar Year, is deliberately absent of anything that could give scale to the nameless ice structures. Nameless because unlike mountains, for example, which are around for a long period of time, these icebergs are only present for one season and then they get released — they just disappear. De Pomereu writes: Icebergs without names. Totems of the underworld transiting at the frozen interface of water and atmosphere; born of the perpetual transformation of the physical realm. At a time when the vulnerability of the chryosphere is made increasingly apparent by the work of scientists, this series of photographs, Sans Nom, seek to evoke the fragility, as well as the generative power of ice. The shot with a broad crack splitting the ice plains, is a particular favourite of mine. Demonstrating the fragility of the ice, the beginning of a break up process, the coming of summer. Photography courtesy of Jean de Pomereu


Joyce Croonen — @joycecroonen — based in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, is a social psychologist and entrepreneur. She also runs the successful minimalist fashion & interior blog, MyDubio. Today we take a closer look at Joyce’s stylish and beautifully captured Instagram photographs and how she has come to curate such a lovely collection. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? I started blogging about fashion and interior more than a year ago and although my style was always basic, it became more minimalistic each month. Somehow it suits who I am — I don’t like to be at the centre of attention (online I can handle it, offline on the other hand…), and it also matches the way I view the world. When there’s too much going on you don’t notice the beautiful details anymore. And I’m a sucker for details! How does your surroundings impact your creativity? I think going to museums, reading other blogs and keeping your eyes open in general helps to develop your own style. So I try to visit inspiring places as much as possible. That’s also why I love to travel — it gives me a new perspective on things. Other than that,...


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder – and to many, so is art. In any case, the humble pocket has been elevated into the status of beautiful, spellbinding works of art through the lens of luxury still life photographers Maurice Scheltens & Liesbeth Abbenes, with styling by Sam Logan, commissioned for issue no. 9 of The Gentlewoman. It’s a straightfoward, simple enough concept, but the masterful use of light and shadows in highlighting the impeccable detailing of the garments portrayed gives the whole series – and especially the humble pocket – a mistifying, iconic sheen.


I have a strong appreciation for minimalist photography, and when Portuguese photographer & filmmaker Nuno Andrade introduced his recent work to me, I was excited to share this with you, our readers. Nuno Andrade’s project titled EBM, is a brilliant and beautifully captured collection inspired by the Marine Biology Station of Funchal. This infrastructure is dedicated to scientific research and is designed to enable the development of science and technologies of the Sea, in the Autonomous Region of Madeira, especially in the areas of biology and ecology of coastal and deep waters. The building itself is designed by architect Gonçalo Byrne and consists of six floors. Minimalist architecture encapsulated by minimalist photography, which has been superbly executed by Andrade. He writes: I consider myself a coherent photographer and I know that my projects are expressions of my personal likes. I love visions with great impact, and I try to create powerful and timeless images.


Dylan Cao — @dlancao — is originally from Vietnam, but arrived in New York four years ago to pursue a fashion design degree. Currently studying accessory design, Dylan will soon be graduating with the ambition of becoming a footwear designer. Today we gain an insight into Dylan’s creative and superbly captured Instagram collection whilst discovering a little more about the man behind the camera. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? My collection of photos actually remains as a reflector and a reminder of the consistency in simplicity I would love to achieve in both my design processes and personal life. I do feel that as a designer, my process starts with constructing and adding, which is followed by deconstruction and elimination. By posting Instagram photos every now and then, I feel refreshed in a sense that I am able to absorb and communicate simplicity not only through my body work but also through everyday life. Minimalism does seep through you to eventually form a lifestyle. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? I have a very strong reaction to composition and geometry in architecture since I grew up with my father who is an engineer and also...


Sarah Van Peteghem — @sarah_cocolapine — is a Belgian born and Berlin based interaction designer and interior stylist at Fantastic Frank. Alongside this, she runs the blog Coco Lapine Design, which also features a small online store of elegant accessories & prints. Today we take a closer look into Sarah’s everyday life through her beautiful Instagram collection and how it has evolved. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? I like to try out many different things inside my home. When something turns out pretty, I take a picture of it and publish it. And this sometimes works the other way around as well: I think about what would look nice on a picture and end up arranging my home in that way. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? I like to surround myself with objects, which I find functional and well designed, but most importantly, I’m the most creative when everything around me is organised. It’s a good motivation to clean the house. When and how do you decide to take a photo? When I find something pretty or interesting. It actually made me look at things differently: when you think about pictures and making photo’s...