Minimalissimo


Categorized “Art & Illustration”

Crafted by Canadian artist Karen Zalamea, Pierre/Paysage  (Stone/Landscape in French) is a collection of ten photographic images presenting transformed representations of space. Layers of acetate were cut into different geometric shapes, carefully positioned and lit to create different formal arrangements, alluding to abstract yet quite tangible architectonic, topographic and cartographic silhouettes – at once diaphanous and yet surprisingly solid. Zalamea’s work is involved in the material concerns of image-making practices, often incorporating intricate processes that fuse elements of drawing, sculpture, and performance in her photographic and video production. A stunning feat to coordinate so many disciplines into such sophisticated, minimalistic outputs.


Light in Water is a remarkably beautiful installation developed by Parisian DGT architects, initially four years ago during Milan Design Week, but has now been relaunched in the Éléphant Paname Art and Dance Centre, located in Paris, for its opening event of 2015. Sixteen rings of slotted tubes fitted to the ceiling, with each hole providing sixty drops of water per second falling due to gravity, for a total amount of three tons of water continually recirculating in the space. This creates an immersive and sensitive experience using two different tones of light. The architects tell us: Light and water are essences of everything; without any light and water, there is no evolution in life for all. Light in Water is part of the exhibition Lumieres — The Play of Brilliants and will be exhibited until 31 May.


Sarah Oppenheimer is challenging the distinction between art and architecture with a unique collection of windows and wall openings. Using wall incisions and glass as her mediums, Oppenheimer blurs the line between room and painting. From 2012 to present, Oppenheimer’s work has been featured in the PPOW Gallery in New York City, as well as in Kunsthaus Baselland and Von Bartha Garage in Switzerland. While each piece is unique in its form and location, they all bear striking similarities. Glass and black aluminum jut from the walls in a playful geometry. Each opening looks different from various angles and distances. These pieces play with the mind as they distort the structural components of the room and challenge our perception of size and space. The use of glass and cut-outs invites the user to interact with the work by looking out a window or passing through a doorway. In this sense Oppenheimer’s series is firmly rooted in architecture, as we rarely get the chance to interact with art in this way. Yet it is impossible not to relate the aesthetic of these pieces to the oversized cubist paintings of artists past and present. These gorgeous designs are architecture, painting, and sculpture all at once; a combination...


Dish 60 by Minimalux is a seductive and sophisticated gesture to the professional desktop. Amid the gadgets of interconnectedness, this piece sits as a sculptural nuance. Made with a stainless steel base and from solid brass, mirror polished by hand and electroplated in black nickel, this bowl is beautifully crafted. Also available in a plain, non-plated brass finish, this 60mm x 30mm piece is available through Leibal. The Liebal Store is a place of curated items focused on quality, minimalism and functionality. Dish 60 is no exception. Photography courtesy of Liebal Store.


A Wallpaper* Design Award 2015 winner for Best Brand Extension, the Vipp Shelter is a minimalist prefabricated house designed by Danish design company Vipp. This monochromatic 55m2 structure is designed to be placed in the natural setting of your choice. Furniture, appliances, lighting, tableware and towels have already been picked out and will be waiting for you on your first arrival, six months after you place your order. It contains a large kitchen with a dining and living area, a hall, separate bathroom and a stunning loft space. Morten Bo Jensen, Vipp’s chief designer, explains: We see the house as a product (such as a caravan, yacht, private jet, etc.) and not as a piece of architecture — hence the name “shelter”. The design is completely fixed and everything down to the smallest detail is designed in advance. 75 years of experience with steel processing is used to craft this prefabricated object designed to perfection. The only choice left to the customer is where to place it. So it is neither a house nor a mobile home. Rather it is a spacious, functional, and liveable industrial object. Amazing. Photography courtesy of Vipp.


Wide Eyed Legless is the blog and labour of love of Minneapolis-based designer and stylist Madelynn Furlong, who has now unveiled her latest project — The WEL shop, filled with highly curated goods that represent Wide Eyed Legless’ minimalist aesthetic and values. Drawn from collaborations with like-minded friends, WEL seeks to form a relationship between visual artists, designers and those who wish to inherit beautiful objects into their lives. We see ourselves as a “communal well” to partake of art and beauty — a place to celebrate the creator, the cerated and the space between. WEL’s selection of clothes, accessories, jewellery and art objects are beautifully offset by impeccable art direction and Liz Gardner and Bodega‘s styling. Everything in the shop is limited edition with only 10 or less of each piece, with most being even just 1 of 1. Photography by Caylon Hackwith.


Born in Eindhoven, Dutch abstract painter Arjan Janssen is the creator of incredibly striking, minimal canvases. With a background in art and philosophy, Janssen’s abstract work, with reduced elements, is always vertically oriented, keeping it grounded. He writes: I try to achieve this by the way I work with the material. You can see and feel the working process in the lines and in the paint. In the composition there are always elements which pull the work downwards. His arrangements, often muted and dark, alongside the balanced geometric elements placed upon the canvas, gives the viewer a sense of mystery. My art moves between being withdrawn into myself and being outwardly directed. A tension that requires a delicate balance. Beautiful work.


A hundred years after the start of the First World War in 1914, The International Memorial Notre-Dame de Lorette was inaugurated last week, to reconcile the 580,000 casualties of the war in northern France. With a great sense of respect, regardless of nationality, rank or religion, all names have been written in alphabetical order on three-metre high walls, along a giant elliptical ring comprised of concrete for the exterior, and inset with 500 copper-toned panels. The memorial has been designed be the architect Philippe Prost and explains that he looked for a sense of unity with this form: I was thinking about the rings you make when you’re a child, or a human ring when everyone holds each other’s hands in a sign of fellowship, and that seemed to me like the image, the form, best suited to speaking about these soldiers killed in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region, and who today are brought together all in one place. Brusque and delicate at the same time, symbolic and sensitive, a work full of emotion that does not leave indifference.


Madrid based contemporary art gallery Sabrina Amrani exhibited at the last Artissima art fair in Turin Waqas Khan, a talented Pakistani artist. After studying at the National College of Arts and graduating as a Bachelor of Fine Arts, his work has been exhibited in renowned international galleries. He trained in the traditional practice of miniature painting, inspired by Muslim, Hindu and Sufi traditions, but instead uses his skills to create drawings on a large scale. The process is almost architectural, like building something slowly, brick by brick. The bricks are dots, marks and lines, assembled with precision and delicacy into simple compositions. An idea of instability is told with abstract drawings, small circles spread with precision and freedom in geometric but unpredictable patterns. I like that. Some of these works have been recently acquired by prestigious institutions such as the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the Kiran Nadar Museum of Art and the Devi Foudation, New Delhi. Photography courtesy of Sabrina Amrani.


London based illustrator and designer, Thomas Danthony recently collaborated with Black Dragon press to create a beautifully minimalist series focused on Brutalism architecture in London. Inspired by their concrete beauty, Danthony has illustrated three of London’s most iconic buildings in all their Brutalist glory for a series of limited edition prints. The release consists of three six-colour A2 hand-pulled screenprints depicting the Royal College of Physicians, the National Theatre, and Trellick Tower, as well as an A4 concertina booklet featuring commentary from architect, critic and “Fuck Yeah Brutalism” curator, Michael Abrahamson. The series is available for purchase together or individually. Danthony successfully captures the essence of each of these Brutalist builds, beautifully highlighting their use of concrete.


Fusionner 3.0: Air House is a new installation developed by the Japanese designer Kotaro Horiuchi — embedded into the gallery of Aichi Shukutoku University. The installation inserts visitors into a house of air, using paper as an architectural material. The white layers are suspended from the ceiling throughout the space as a repetition of the silhouette of a house, progressively changing its size and form, until you reach a small window. Horiuchi explains: When you went inside by making your body smaller, you could slowly notice a silhouette of a house, which seemed to change its size continuously. You were able to experience the air spreading in it and discover models hidden between the papers. You could gather, discuss, enjoy the moment and even lie down for a different perspective.


Belle Langford — @hellablissed — is an Australian writer and illustrator based in Sydney. Her Instagram collection Hellablissed is a refined stripped back collection of minimalist illustrations and vignettes. We caught up with Belle to discuss her work. What is your muse for creating minimalist work? I’m fascinated by the beauty in things that are pared back, simple and understated. I’m always drawn to the incomplete or the undone; when you have to look closely to find the beauty in something — there’s no feeling like the surprise of discovering it unexpectedly. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist illustrated work? I’m an intensely nostalgic person and memory is probably the biggest source of inspiration for me. I’m not really concerned with recreating the most realistic or accurate depiction of something, but rather a feeling of that thing; its essence. And I put that solely down to the fuzzy pictures you get when reminiscing – intense sensation and an impression of what was, but no real particulars. How do your surroundings impact your creativity? The Australian landscape really can be quite harsh, rugged and weathered but whenever I’m away from it, I can’t really function. I’ve always felt a connectedness...