Minimalissimo


Categorized “Electronic art”

James Turrell’s latest exhibition, A Retrospective, pays homage to a much celebrated career spanning over half a century. The exhibition is currently being shown at LACMA, where Turrell himself was a driving force behind the curation of his work with instruction; you have to reserve a ticket and there are strict maximum capacities of certain pieces. Such detailing of experience is imperative to his work. Installations that encompass entire rooms and yet are composed of singular lines encompass minimalist principles at best, with vast impact through light and scale. Born in California, Turrell’s career has seen the composition of works that comprise a combination of light projections, prints, drawings and installations. This latest exhibition is about exploring sensory deprivation and highlights work from his past and most recent works. Said to have been a key artist in the Southern California Light and Space movement of the 1960s and 70s, the importance of this exhibition is great. Turrell says, I make spaces that apprehend light in our perception, and in some ways gather it, or seem to hold it. His work is represented across the US and throughout Europe and is not about light, or a record of light; it is...


Fabian Bürgy is a Swiss born sculptor and independent digital creative, who’s diverse and artistic practice includes sculpture, installation and digital imaging. His work explores the aesthetic of things through random encounters of materials, misplaced situations and spatial relationships. It is a series of Bürgy’s incredible installations and digital creations that I would like to share with you here. He creates conceptual situations and small interventions, which are inspired by a wide range of mundane objects and appearances. All of which are characterised by a slightly violent and disturbing process of transformation, misplacement and dysfunction of things. Bürgy takes specific thoughts and develops conflicts with precise and absolutely minimalistic means – constantly exploring the point where known things become something else, where metamorphosis is reached. Personal favourite has to be the lonely and misplaced black cloud floating in space. Wonderful.


Japanese composer and visual artist Ryoji Ikeda recently designed an exhibition for the Hamburger Bahnhof museum in Berlin, which ran from 28 January to 9 April of this year. The project’s title ‘db‘ (abbr. for decibel) refers to the symmetry of the two halls on the upper level of the museum’s east and west wings, while simultaneously indicating the complementary relationship between the two exhibition spaces. The project is a composition in which time and space are shaped through the most minimal use of sound, light and visual elements. There is a very insightful video of the exhibition, which illustrates just how stunning this work of art is. If you managed to visit the ‘db’ exhibition in person however, please share your thoughts.


Ryoji Ikeda is one of the most innovative electronic musicians who has a worldwide impact on electronic music development. The Paris based Japanese artist is one of the earliest to reduce electronic music to sheer ultrasonics, frequencies and tonal variations. His work has been internationally exhibited, toured and released. Datamatics is a series of work that takes live, present data as a source to generate visuals and music.  Ikeda pushes the limit of minimalism by combining abstract and mimetic presentations of matter, time and space and uses the least of graphics to visualize them. The idea of turning the invisible to visible and how the visualized result interacts with a 3D space and human being offer a powerful and deep reflection of our living in this data exploding century. Ryoji Ikeda’s latest solo exhibition The Transfinite will find its way to the Park Avenue Armory, New York from May 20 to June 11, 2011. Photos courtesy of Liz Hingley, Ryuichi Maruo (YCAM) & Forma


Ultra-Violet Live is an improvised live audio visual performance with savage, minimalist and low-fi aesthetics. The artists, French musician Jerome Montagne and video artist Philippe Fontes used nothing more that UV tables and a no-input mixing board. Fontes and Montagne belong to the French electronic art collective Plusmoins (translated: Plus Minus). Their work balances on the fine line between ‘very stimulating’ and ‘disturbing’. Can you handle it?