Minimalissimo


Categorized “Art & Illustration”

My wire sculptures tell stories of simple human moments: a woman adjusting her hair, a face gazing from behind tightly wrapped arms, a mother gently cradling her baby. The honest, unguarded moments are the ones that I find to be the most beautiful. Simple human moments executed in a simple and poignant physical form, Zimbabwe-born Gavin Worth‘s wire sculptures are mesmerizing in their beautiful frugality. By bending black wire into free-standing life drawings, he creates sculptures that engage the viewer in their subtle changes –  when the light in the room shifts, so does the mood of the piece. Worth is a self-taught artist, having cultivated a lifelong passion for drawing, painting, and sculpture. He worked for nearly a decade in San Francisco as an actor and musician before moving to Cairo, Egypt to teach at the American International School.


Edition One is a series of minimalist pastel toned linework on rich metallic paper. The pastel colors, printed with matte ink, give a nice contrast with the background and throughout the day the appearance will change by the light. Like the name says Edition One is the first edition of metallic prints by Yield. The series is produced in a limited edition of 100 pieces. Yield was founded in 2012 by Rachel Gant and Andrew Deming. The co-founders met at California College of the Arts, where Gant studied Industrial Design and Deming studied Design Strategy.


Established and evolving artist, Dion Hortsmans is continuing to make leaps and bounds in the world of contemporary sculpture. After a veritable amount of time in the sun; sailing and searching, his feet firmly landed firmly back on soil, before plunging into his sculptural artistic pursuits. With a recent exhibition, Night Rider under his belt, his work has graced audiences in galleries and publications since 1996 across Australia. He notes that to be able to ask, and then to listen and believing in your passion are two of the prized earnings from his process. An idea is a nano-second, the journey is in making the idea, formulating it, working out how to do it, mostly when you’re on that trip you have a gazillion other ideas. Hortsmans has an extensive CV of work, spanning commissions and galleries in Melbourne and Sydney. His work is a combination of lines, embodying movement in still objects and responding to notions of want; a dynamic want. The line work is a geometric explosion of shapes resulting from lines, extrusions and playing with elements of scale. I am biased, but not blindly so, in saying that Hortsmans is a genius and his work a manifestation...


Some things are so ubiquitous around the internet that they just get taken for granted, even – or especially – in the design world, which is a small one indeed. So let’s set that aside for a moment and talk about Garance Doré‘s fashion illustrations. I’m not a fashionista particularly, but I do enjoy fashion design, and to me Ms. Doré’s work has always brought an extra dose of fun to that world. The line work is simple and direct, and the use of color is always limited, usually with a pop of bright tones, just enough to give it life and movement. The story of her persuit of illustration as a career is also an interesting read – her writing style is humorous, open and lighthearted, even when looking back at difficult patches, and that is always inspiring.


Australian artist Matthew Allen, currently based in Sydney, is a colour based painter. His work, which has been consistently exhibited at Sydney’s Sullivan+Strumpf gallery since 2008, consists of a beautiful collection of minimalist colour combinations. Allen’s paintings are absent of any formal composition and physical elements of the artist’s hand to present an ongoing enquiry into the pure materiality of paint upon canvas and the fundamental structure of painting itself: colour, medium and process. The painting is delicately handled to produce soft gradients of tone that in turn creates an atmospheric, sensory and emotional experience for the viewer. Some of the gradients Allen has created, particularly in his 2010 works, look absolutely superb.


Danish electronics giant Bang & Olufsen need little introduction. Consistently producing timeless design with high quality materials, B&O have recently released these incredibly beautiful BeoPlay H6 headphones. A pair I have been fortunate enough to test hours on end over the past week. Firstly, the design of the BeoPlay H6 is hugely impressive, striking the right balance of classic and modern design influences, resulting in a simple, elegant, and extremely comfortable pair of headphones. The design itself was conceived by Jakob Wagner, and with a choice of black or natural leather, it is a perfect match for the style-conscious consumer who refuses to compromise quality in sound, design or craftsmanship. The natural, stitched cow leather cover and soft lambskin ear pads, which I am currently using, should age gracefully with use. My favourite design features however, (aside from being the most comfortable headphones I have ever worn) are the detachable audio cable and the ports in both speakers. This not only allows you to decide which side to insert the cable, it also allows you to share your audio with others. For such high-end headphones, there is high expectations for the BeoPlay H6 when it comes to sound quality. Perhaps...


Based in Canberra, Australia, Brian Corr is a sculptor and artist who’s pure and aesthetically simple works I would like to highlight today. Working primarily with glass and the elements of light and shadow, volume and void, he creates architectonic sculpture and large-scale installations, which serve as reflections and interpretations of his own experience. Corr writes: My hope is that these works provide an opportunity for contemplation or meditation; a moment of heightened awareness of the nature and wonder of ourselves and the world in which we exist. It is Brian Corr’s Constructions and Architectural Installation works that have impressed me most, with their simple forms and manipulation of light and shadow. Wonderful. Images by Rob Little.


Amsterdam based artist Berndnaut Smilde is known for his cloud installations. After the TIME magazine listed them as one of the Top 10 inventions of 2012, people’s fascination with Smilde’s work became widespread. The latest cloud installation, called Nimbus Green Room, took place this summer at the Veterans Building in downtown San Francisco. Here is how artist comments on this project: It’s not so much about the shape of the cloud but about placing it out of its natural context. It brings duality, because you can’t really grasp how to interpret the situation you are viewing. People have always had strong metaphysical connections to clouds as they symbolize the ominous. Even though the clouds look spontaneous, each takes meticulous preparation. The room has to have the right temperature and humidity for the effect to last several seconds. Probably the most fleeting installation in history, Numbus creates a profound impact. And each chosen room adds new context and atmosphere. Watch the film about the Nimbus project to see it in the making.


French artist Nathalie Dérouet lives and works in Douarnenez, north-western France. From her ceramics workshop, she creates a range of exceptional porcelain pieces, including unique bowls, vases, pots and various containers, all of which embrace open space. Highlighting a few favourites from Dérouet’s many ceramic creations, it’s clear the inspiration behind these pieces are taken from Chinese and Japanese ceramics, countries where refinement and sophistication are present in many everyday objects, reflecting tradition and modernity. It’s the purity and simplicity of these extremely thin designs that appeal to me most. The smooth surfaces and uniqueness of each piece makes for certain wish-listing.


James Turrell’s latest exhibition, A Retrospective, pays homage to a much celebrated career spanning over half a century. The exhibition is currently being shown at LACMA, where Turrell himself was a driving force behind the curation of his work with instruction; you have to reserve a ticket and there are strict maximum capacities of certain pieces. Such detailing of experience is imperative to his work. Installations that encompass entire rooms and yet are composed of singular lines encompass minimalist principles at best, with vast impact through light and scale. Born in California, Turrell’s career has seen the composition of works that comprise a combination of light projections, prints, drawings and installations. This latest exhibition is about exploring sensory deprivation and highlights work from his past and most recent works. Said to have been a key artist in the Southern California Light and Space movement of the 1960s and 70s, the importance of this exhibition is great. Turrell says, I make spaces that apprehend light in our perception, and in some ways gather it, or seem to hold it. His work is represented across the US and throughout Europe and is not about light, or a record of light; it is...


Australian artist and designer Belinda Winkler has produced yet another series to the evolution of her beautiful voluptuous forms, respectively named Gravity + Align + Brink. The collections evoke connections, sensually, emotionally and imaginatively, all embodying a recurring theme of light and shadow while playing on a sense of tension between the objects. Finished from a combination of porcelain and bronze, this minimalist artist describes the process as soft, dove grey dewy forms emerging from their moulds. Winkler has contributed to both solo and group exhibitions, having won awards internationally and within Australia, where she studied. She is based in Hobart, Tasmania where she creates her sculptures and public art. Self described as a maker by nature, her work is represented by the Bett Gallery in Hobart, Tasmania. Described as biotic minimalism, I find her work to be extremely beautiful, intriguing and playful. The performance that each piece plays on gravity, and the traditional expectations of form is incredible and challenges the imagination. Gravity + Align + Brink all tempt touch, be that with the eyes, the hands, the memory or the imagination where the relationship between forms, where curve almost meets curve, nearly, but not quite touching, creating a...


Last month we featured the talented Bern-based Studio Zimoun and their wonderful sound sculptures. The studio’s latest offering is no exception. Introducing thier first permanent installation, Zimoun closely collaborated with architect Hannes Zweifel, producing a large, towering mechanical sound sculpture inside a beautiful abandoned toluene tank from 1951, located in Dottikon, Switzerland. The installation presents a complex kinetic sound sculpture, this time with 329 DC-motors and cotton balls arranged meticulously throughout the interior fabric of the space, producing a stunningly stark appearance and hypnotic hum. I’m happy this is a permanent installation, as it gives me time to get out there and see it for myself. Great work. → Watch the Toluene Tank installation video