Minimalissimo


Categorized “Sculpture”

Tony Smith’s current exhibition Forms through Matthew Marks Gallery is a testament to his life’s work. The series of space-enveloping forms are striking, bold and minimal. Tony’s iconic, geometric metal forms actual emerged in tandem with the burgeoning minimalist scene, and this exhibition is a nod to this dedication. Responsible for more than fifty large-scale sculptures in the final two decades of this life, his work as a contemporary of American art still stands relevant and as beautiful as ever. His works, in particular, the curation of Forms, highlights how art can have a transformative ability; that through art and sculpture, spaces and architectures can be created and changed. Smith’s work is described as contributing to the idea of reductionism that lies at the heart of minimalism. And that contribution is to be celebrated. His estate is handled through Matthew Marks Gallery.


Created by an all-Belgian team, the Spring/Summer 2014 campaign for Linda Farrow‘s male eyewear collection features highly elegant still life sets created by photographer by Frederik Vercruysse in collaboration with art direction studio Uber and Kosher. Merging architectural shapes and eyewear in a pure and conceptual manner, the sleek compositions feature clean lines and somber color palettes that offset and highlight the pieces created by the likes of Dries Van Noten, Phillip Lim, Oscar de la Renta, The Row, Matthew Williamson and Kris van Assche. Vercruysse aims to photograph his subjects in their purest forms — sometimes realistic, often minimalistic, and always highly stylized — the perfect companion to Uber and Kosher’s monolithic, elegant sculptures, grounded in a dry Belgian minimalism with a timeless signature.


I really have no words to express my fascination by Richard Serra‘s latest work — East-West/West-East — a permanent sculptural installation in Qatar’s desert, approximately 60 kilometers from Doha at the Brouq Nature Reserve. The installation is a set of four 50ft steel towers that connect the two seas and the two parts of this ancient landscape. Serra explains: The placement is not geometrical, it’s topological; they can only be placed where they are to achieve the curvature of the land. If one walks through the pieces; he will understand not only the rhythm of himself in relationship to the landscape but also the rhythm of himself in relationship to the height and the length of the pieces. Serra has developed this stunning installation, even though it is situated in the middle of the desert, and is quite possibly the largest scene where he has expressed his art work. Photography by Sally Crane.


Last year we featured the wonderful minimalist stainless steel sculptures of Australian visual artist, George Papadimas. His latest works are the products of his ongoing fascination with numerical sequences and the inherent relationships that occur within mathematical algorithms. The sculptural work, Untitled Paired Quarter Sequence, utilises Papadimas’s adaptation of the Fibonacci sequence, in which the resulting multi-digit numbers are reduced to their single digit sum. The imagery, Untitled Paired Digits, is a beautiful series of highly saturated hues, of which the base format is the elementary representation of two paired numbers in written form. At the heart of each work, mathematical premise reigns. One fully embodies the harmonic relationship between line and form, and the other does its best to conceal. I like the concept behind these pieces, but particularly the clean connections of the skeletal structures. These are currently being exhibited at Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam until 8th December 2013.


My wire sculptures tell stories of simple human moments: a woman adjusting her hair, a face gazing from behind tightly wrapped arms, a mother gently cradling her baby. The honest, unguarded moments are the ones that I find to be the most beautiful. Simple human moments executed in a simple and poignant physical form, Zimbabwe-born Gavin Worth‘s wire sculptures are mesmerizing in their beautiful frugality. By bending black wire into free-standing life drawings, he creates sculptures that engage the viewer in their subtle changes –  when the light in the room shifts, so does the mood of the piece. Worth is a self-taught artist, having cultivated a lifelong passion for drawing, painting, and sculpture. He worked for nearly a decade in San Francisco as an actor and musician before moving to Cairo, Egypt to teach at the American International School.


Based in Canberra, Australia, Brian Corr is a sculptor and artist who’s pure and aesthetically simple works I would like to highlight today. Working primarily with glass and the elements of light and shadow, volume and void, he creates architectonic sculpture and large-scale installations, which serve as reflections and interpretations of his own experience. Corr writes: My hope is that these works provide an opportunity for contemplation or meditation; a moment of heightened awareness of the nature and wonder of ourselves and the world in which we exist. It is Brian Corr’s Constructions and Architectural Installation works that have impressed me most, with their simple forms and manipulation of light and shadow. Wonderful. Images by Rob Little.


French artist Nathalie Dérouet lives and works in Douarnenez, north-western France. From her ceramics workshop, she creates a range of exceptional porcelain pieces, including unique bowls, vases, pots and various containers, all of which embrace open space. Highlighting a few favourites from Dérouet’s many ceramic creations, it’s clear the inspiration behind these pieces are taken from Chinese and Japanese ceramics, countries where refinement and sophistication are present in many everyday objects, reflecting tradition and modernity. It’s the purity and simplicity of these extremely thin designs that appeal to me most. The smooth surfaces and uniqueness of each piece makes for certain wish-listing.


James Turrell’s latest exhibition, A Retrospective, pays homage to a much celebrated career spanning over half a century. The exhibition is currently being shown at LACMA, where Turrell himself was a driving force behind the curation of his work with instruction; you have to reserve a ticket and there are strict maximum capacities of certain pieces. Such detailing of experience is imperative to his work. Installations that encompass entire rooms and yet are composed of singular lines encompass minimalist principles at best, with vast impact through light and scale. Born in California, Turrell’s career has seen the composition of works that comprise a combination of light projections, prints, drawings and installations. This latest exhibition is about exploring sensory deprivation and highlights work from his past and most recent works. Said to have been a key artist in the Southern California Light and Space movement of the 1960s and 70s, the importance of this exhibition is great. Turrell says, I make spaces that apprehend light in our perception, and in some ways gather it, or seem to hold it. His work is represented across the US and throughout Europe and is not about light, or a record of light; it is...


Australian artist and designer Belinda Winkler has produced yet another series to the evolution of her beautiful voluptuous forms, respectively named Gravity + Align + Brink. The collections evoke connections, sensually, emotionally and imaginatively, all embodying a recurring theme of light and shadow while playing on a sense of tension between the objects. Finished from a combination of porcelain and bronze, this minimalist artist describes the process as soft, dove grey dewy forms emerging from their moulds. Winkler has contributed to both solo and group exhibitions, having won awards internationally and within Australia, where she studied. She is based in Hobart, Tasmania where she creates her sculptures and public art. Self described as a maker by nature, her work is represented by the Bett Gallery in Hobart, Tasmania. Described as biotic minimalism, I find her work to be extremely beautiful, intriguing and playful. The performance that each piece plays on gravity, and the traditional expectations of form is incredible and challenges the imagination. Gravity + Align + Brink all tempt touch, be that with the eyes, the hands, the memory or the imagination where the relationship between forms, where curve almost meets curve, nearly, but not quite touching, creating a...


Last month we featured the talented Bern-based Studio Zimoun and their wonderful sound sculptures. The studio’s latest offering is no exception. Introducing thier first permanent installation, Zimoun closely collaborated with architect Hannes Zweifel, producing a large, towering mechanical sound sculpture inside a beautiful abandoned toluene tank from 1951, located in Dottikon, Switzerland. The installation presents a complex kinetic sound sculpture, this time with 329 DC-motors and cotton balls arranged meticulously throughout the interior fabric of the space, producing a stunningly stark appearance and hypnotic hum. I’m happy this is a permanent installation, as it gives me time to get out there and see it for myself. Great work. → Watch the Toluene Tank installation video


Speaking of the notion of ‘suchness’ in his book Zen and the Brian, James H. Austin notes: In Japanese, the word ‘sono-mama’ had long implied that something could stand as it is, untouched. In Chinese, the expressions ‘Chi-mo’ or ‘Shi-mo’ were used to mean ‘just so’, or ‘so it is.’ I open with this quote to introduce Carl Andre’s sculpture of 1966, Equivalent VIII, which consists of of 120 fire bricks arranged as a rectangular prism on the floor of the gallery space. I would like to suggest—for I haven’t encountered it myself—a Zen Buddhist reading of Andre’s work, which would frame it as a presentation of things as they are, untouched. In David Batchelor’s book on Minimal Art, André is quoted as saying this about his work: The one thing I learned in my work is that to make the work I wanted to you couldn’t impose properties on materials, you have to reveal the properties of the material. And elsewhere, speaking of his sculpture: Their subject is matter. These quotes encapsulate for me what is offered by Andre’s work: the opportunity to encounter this sculpture as just bricks. Let it be so.


Having previously been featured on Minimalissimo, thrilling us with his exceptional sound installations, Swiss artist Zimoun has returned with three new terrific pieces. It is one in particular that I would like to share with you however – 198 prepared DC-motors, wire isolated, cardboard boxes. Curated by CAN Neuchatel, this installation not only offers a beautiful minimalist aesthetic, but it also embodies some of the purest elements of contemporary culture – constant speed, constant noise and constant motion. In an obsessive display of simple and functional materials, these works articulate a tension between the orderly patterns of Modernism and the chaotic forces of life. Carrying an emotional depth, the acoustic hum of natural phenomena in Zimoun’s minimalist constructions, effortlessly reverberates. → Watch the 198 DC-motors video