Minimalissimo


Categorized “Sculpture”

Trace Heavens by James Nizam, is an installation that plays with light in its natural form, through manipulation of the building it exists through. Primarily, his work is based on manipulating the form of homes and buildings slated for demolition with the intention to repurpose their inevitable future, through capturing a moment. The resulting works are photographic. Trace Heavens was originally composed in 2011, and exhibited in Vancouver in 2012. Nizam, originally from England, now living in Canada, is represented in galleries across Canada and Switzerland. His work is a combined portfolio of his own solo work, and collaborations with other artists, across these geographical platforms. His work can be found in a number of private collections across the United States, Europe and Canada also. Trace Heavens, as well as Nizam’s other work, centres around the idea of the rooms becoming backdrops for the discarded contents and architectural debris that he accumulated and constructed into sculptures of elegant complexity. The emphasis on re-inventing and giving meaning to an otherwise discarded object, through manipulation of its form, is at the heart of this inquiry of Nizam’s understanding of the photograph as a trace; a documentary image that comes to act as...


I first saw the work of Anish Kapoor at GOMA for the 2007 Asia Pacific Triennial. It left a very deep impression on me, and I am fortunate to have had another experience of his work just this week at his current exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney. Kudos to the curatorial and installation team for putting together such a successful show; I left with that same feeling of awe I had several years ago. I found his work to be incredibly moving and transcendental, and enjoyed the scope of his body of work. I wanted to write about the exhibition for Minimalissimo, but I could not find suitable images on the MCA’s website from the show, so I’d like to draw your attention to just one work, which is titled Sky Mirror. Installed at the entrance of the MCA, this sculpture is a large circular piece of reflective stainless steel, installed at an angle to mirror the sky and its surroundings. A very simple and effective piece, the work has been installed in many different locations, and Mr Kapoor’s website features documentation and even videos of its previous incarnations.


Australian born visual artist, George Papadimas, currently based in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, has a staggeringly impressive body of work including geometric forms and colour, and so today I am featuring a collection of his enamel on stainless steel minimalist sculptures. Each sculpture is a distortion of a cube comprised of stainless steel rods coated in black enamel. These art works, created in 2010, are perhaps Papadimas’s most striking sculptures, though many of them could certainly be defined as deceptively minimalist. I’ll undoubtedly be keeping an eye out for future exhibitions. Wonderful work.


Richard Long (b. 1945) is an English artist working in the mediums of painting, photography and sculpture. He is perhaps best known as a land artist, and the works featured here derive from this genre. Beautiful installations of natural material, including rock and bark, arranged in meticulous geometric forms. Whether situated in modern or old buildings, outdoors or near the sea, they never cease to juxtapose their surroundings exquisitely. Having seen some of this work in person at AGNSW recently, I was particularly impressed by their scale and struck with a feeling of awe. Can anyone else relay an encounter of Long’s work?


Until September 9, photographer Jacky Redgate is exhibiting a collection of work at the Art Gallery of New South Wales under the title, The Logic of Vision. My favourite piece from the show is Untitled, vase shape #1-#5 from 1986-1989, where black objects are placed on black backgrounds (wooden stands which act as both plinths and infinity screens). Viewing them from the front, it is easy to miss the existence of the objects completely, but once we navigate through the space and view them from the side, they come fully into our consciousness. I think this is a marvellous exploration of the potential for the monochrome to render, “three-dimensional ‘things in the world’ into two dimensional images”, and the way colour and space form a relationship in our perception of the world. Writing of the work in 1993, Ross Gibson says: The object itself can not be represented and can only be experienced by the viewer seeing it directly, reinstating an elusive aura of the original which photography has largely replaced, but one which can only be fleetingly grasped. These images do the work no justice, so if you get a chance to see it in person, I’d highly recommend that...


As a fan of New York-based practice Snarkitecture ever since their collaboration with fashion designer Richard Chai, I have been looking forward to their new installation in Chicago’s Volume Gallery, a series of everyday objects ‘confused’ in their original function, typical context and familiar materials, producing a collection of Fun. A lamp whose globe melts away from leaning onto another lamp. A coffee table frozen in collapse under the weight of a marble that ‘pours’ its heaviness out. These objects are kept in minimal colors and forms to convey the artists’ intention. Funiture reconsiders our reality, often centering on creating confusion – whether with familiar objects in unexpected contexts, or the dissolution of recognizable volumes into irrational forms. Snarkitecture, comprising of Alex Mustonen and Daniel Asham, has often brought the fields of topography and geography into a smaller, human scale. Shelves, smooth on the top surface to function as, well, shelves, are made out of fiberglass and wood while they resemble rock excavations on the underside. Consistent in their philosophy of making architectural sense in their work, what I like most about the collection is that it serves its purpose by reminding us that sometimes it is ok not to take architecture...


Richard Serra is an American minimalist sculptor. Considered one of the best living sculptors, Serra and abstraction have always been associated and he is well known for his minimalist large-scale works of sheet metal. His outdoor sculptures have an initial process of oxidation and the color remains more or less stable over time. One of his more notable works is this mammoth sculpture, Snake, a trio of steel blades that create a curved path. It is permanently located in the largest gallery of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. In 2005, the museum mounted eight of Serra’s sculptures to create a collection entitled The Matter of Time, and Snake has now become an addition to that collection. I had never previously written about sculptures before, but I find Richard Serra’s work really inspiring and powerful. And if you enjoy this you can also check another of Serra’s posts.


Composition Light is a project recently completed by Canadian born designer Miya Kondo. The collection is comprised of a series of light sculptures that vary in size and colour. Used in combination, the objects can create different effects. Depending on the position of the elements and their relation to each other, the quality of light is modified and the ambiance of the space altered. Miya Kondo explains: Light acts as an interpreter for how we experience space – our emotional experience of space, time and place. We can be captivated by the influence of light on the shape of objects, on the atmosphere around us and the feeling of our surroundings. The installation of the Composition Light project recently took place during the Dutch Design Week 2011.


The Swiss artist Zimoun is currently exhibiting his latest installation at the Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida (USA), which runs until January 08 2012. Zimoun, previously featured on Minimalissimo, builds architecturally-minded platforms of sound using simple and functional components, which result in unique and quite beautiful soundscapes. The Sculpting Sound installation, curated by Matthew McLendon is an example of structural simplicity in an industrial-like setting, which reveals an intricate relationship between the artificial and the organic. Zimoun’s creations often use multiples of the same prepared mechanical elements to examine the creation and degeneration of patterns. If I was in the vicinity, this would be a must-see. Fantastic. → Watch the Sculpting Sound video


These minimalist wall sculptures by Cecilia Vissers are made from steel and aluminium and inspired by the Scottish and Irish landscapes. The pieces are characterized by simple compositions, powerful lines and laconic shapes. The surfaces retain the natural texture of the material, creating inspiring visual effects. I want my sculptures to be entirely simple, to be viewed quickly, the focus is on the smooth and flat surface, my abstractions are grounded in the landscapes of Scotland and Ireland, the remoteness and silence. Cecilia Vissers’ work will be displayed as part of a group show at Acquire Space in London from November 13-27, 2011 and in a solo exhibition at Masters & Pelavin Gallery in New York, February 23 to April 5, 2012.


Luisa Chillida is a Spain-based artist full of creativity and imagination. I really like her stunning and minimalist sculptures, mostly made of letters and lines.


Swiss artist Zimoun uses sound in order to create magic. His work is very minimal, based on reductive methods, aesthetics and simplicity, Zimoun creates artificial simple systems, which generate very complex and somehow living structures in sound and motion. He has received the 2010 Prix Ars Electronica: The clean, elegant sound sculptures combine visual, sonic, and spatial elements in an organically balanced entirely artwork. Using simple and well conceived mechanical systems, Zimouns‘s work transforms and activates the space. I simply love it. See Zimoun works.