Minimalissimo


Categorized “Fashion”

The jewellery designed by Swedish silver and goldsmith Patrik Hansson, is as refined and minimalist as possible. It is easy to see Patrik Hansson’s roots in graphic design, an education he undertook before turning to jewellery. Basic geometric shapes like squares, circles and loops are layered and deconstructed precisely. Every detail is thought through, every perspective considered and perfected. So why didn’t he stick to graphic design? He finds inspiration in working with his hands. The crafting itself and the vibrant color of gold seduces him. And that is how he seduces us. For me it’s important to have one thing that catches the attention in a piece. It could be a cut, a line or something else as long as it’s adding to the work. In my opinion you could explore these shapes in depth. However elementary the shapes, it is amazing how Patrik Hansson’s designs provoke attention. Everyone longs to find out what the secret about them actually is. Every single piece is indeed special: they are more potent a statement in an outfit than any huge stone-encrusted piece of jewellery could ever be.


There has always been something so effortless about the way that Christophe Lemaire executes his cuts and silhouettes on the fabrics. Partnering up with Sarah-Linh Tran, his namesake label’s collection for Spring Summer 2015 is extra-enchanting with an easy, breezy vibe that many brands try to imitate. That ease exists in every fold and crease of the knee-length skirts, light trenches, belted dresses, and especially that one single sleeveless floral dress. In the spacious venue of the Bibliothèque de France, there is a presence of an invisible wind that made everything flow, and perhaps the only fixated thing are the viewers’ eyes on the garments. The exposed shoulders and deep neck cuts add a sensual element that communicates luxury that’s completely against what fashion conceives as luxurious as of late: the cool factor. The minimalism that Lemaire is after in this collection suggests a femininity that might be seen as ordinary, but never mediocre. After all, leaving Hermès can only mean more focus and complexity to the future of Christophe Lemaire. Photography courtesy of WWD


Rad Hourani’s latest Unisex Ready to Wear collection captures and entices a sense of curiosity and yet embodies pragmatism. The pieces are a curation of beautiful craftsmanship and are born through an avocation of non-conformity, as the essence of individualism. Hourani himself sees modernity as an odyssey free of rules, gender, age, seasons, boundaries and conditions. This collection is incredibly befitting. Born in Jordan, Hourani himself wears a plethora of hats; designer, photographer, filmmaker, and artist. His work is an attentive study of the human body that celebrates neutrality as a defining human trait. This RTW Collection, and his overall ethos is grounded on this principle. The resulting forms and silhouettes are bold, minimal and timeless. There is an obvious effort to allow the wearer to a freer way to live and through his mindset and that of his label, his passion is obvious. He doesn’t name his collections, he numbers them, so as to attest to not following trends. The palette, the shapes, the fit and the movement of his pieces are incredibly transcendent and of-any-time. I like this. Photography courtesy of the exquisite Rad Hourani.


Poland based fashion label NON just presented its very first, very beautiful, minimalist collection. The designs are based on classic geometry and spatial forms. NON strives for simplicity and emphasizes the unique structure of the material: Every piece is made of 100% Merino wool and every garment is produced to the highest standards in Poland. What defines us is an uncompromising quality dedicated to conscious, demanding women. I love the NON collection for its slightly abstract shapes, which still very elegantly underline the female body. And besides the visual aspect, it feels wonderful to wear the substantial but fine merino wool with all its amazing natural fiber characteristics.


Q Designs streamlined solution to charging smart phones has arrived. The Q Bracelet is now available for order. Initially conceived as a solution to the ever growing issue of decreasing battery life as smart phones are becoming more technologically capable. The solution is one that is about bringing technology and beauty together in a way that challenges the status quo and embraces the bold. Based in New York City, this ingenious product is one that allows technology to be supported by a form-meets-function device. Lightweight, this piece is available in brushed and matt black (for the gents) and polished and matte silver and polished gold (for the ladies). The resulting product aims to deliver on an ever growing problem, and was born out of a frustration of the designers of other available products on the market. Said to bring simplicity and creativity, the Q Bracelet aims to aid an over-sighted element of our tech-savvy lives and can recharge up to approximately 60% of battery life. Cords are now dismissed. Photography courtesy of Q Design.


Sally LaPointe’s Spring/Summer 2015 latest show at New York Fashion Week is truly sophisticated and beautiful collection. Within each individual piece, proportions of familiar elements such as boat necklines, bell shaped skirts, capped sleeves and vests have all taken on a new silhouette. Whether it is a play on the proportions of these elements, a refinement in the tailoring, the lines are blurred so gowns feel more relaxed and casual, and separates are styled to be more serious and formal. New York City-based Sally LaPointe brings a freshness to this strong, almost rocker-chic womenswear line. It is an approachable yet elegant minimalist collection that is simply very cool. Images courtesy of Style.com.


We recently caught up with Håndværk to discuss the brand, its designs, fabrics, and future. Describe your path to creating the brand, Håndværk. We felt there was a void in the market for a label that was solely dedicated to high-end essentials — crafting each piece from the finest fabrics, and focused on the details as the foundation to function. From the start, the ultimate goal was to create a label that we would love as customers, something that would make us proud. Our passion for fine fabrics was the main force driving Håndværk’s creation. Håndværk is an interesting & unusual brand name. Can you explain why you choose it? It is a Danish word that stands for artisanal, a trade, or handy-work. We felt it represents the soul of the label. At the core, we want to highlight that pride achieved by the craftsman with his honest work. We want to convey that making quality garments is a humble and tedious endeavour, miles away from the hype of the fashion world. We have always been huge fans of Danish design, specifically mid-century modern furniture — with the focus on simplicity, honest materials and function. These values influence how we go...


Singapore based womenswear label MAX.TAN focuses on minimalist ideas converted into novel but refined tailoring and exquisit artwork. Details are deliberately blown out of proportion creating unexpected silhouettes and austere moods. The MAX.TAN Spring Summer 2015 collection explores the conceptual idea of infinity. Is there a way for a garment to have no ends, no conventional hems or cuffs? So its key looks combines morphing two-piece garments with volumes inspired by the curves of the infinity symbol. I love the way designer Max Tan manages to stick with minimalist lines and shapes while having a very consistent and particular use of form.


This collaboration between French lingerie line Maison Lejaby and Belgian designer Lea Peckre has bred an Autumn Winter 2014 collection focusing on a sophisticated use of light toned neutrals in see-through bodysuits, with sheer fabrics in asymmetrical drapes and geometric volumes. The figure-hugging shapes emphasize the female curves in a feminine, ethereal and seductive way. Paris-based creative studio Twice were responsible for the art direction and graphic design of the lookbook, framed in simple and elegant graphics that highlight the collection’s power. Photography by Harley Weir.


The Spring Summer 2015 collection by New York City-based label Assembly entices with the effortlessly-casual designed with precise tailoring and draping. Owner Greg Armas’ expertise in both mens and womenswear manifests in the architecture of the details. His journey took Assembly from a fashion design resource to a multi-brand unisex boutique which has since led to their own in-house collection since 2009. Having collaborated with, sourced and sold hard-to-get pieces from brands of the same minimalist design sensibility, Assembly portrays a certain nonchalance towards other moving trends with its confident femininity, making it one of my favorite collections for this season.


You may not yet be familiar with designer Chadwick Bell, and although he has been showcasing his fashion at NYFW since 2008, he does seem to be a bit of a newcomer. Aimed at a mature, sophisticated audience, he spent the last six years refining his collection from fur and feathers to minimalist silhouettes, and a clear sportswear appeal. This makes the few journalists that have discovered his work, place him next to The Row or Organic by James. I love the structured, graphic layering of his remarkable Spring Summer 2015 collection. It is easy to identify with the image of a strong, but sensitive woman in effortless, but very distinct attire. There’s something really worldly about this woman. She isn’t just sitting all the time. She travels, she has collectibles… I like the idea of keepsakes. — style.com review The looks are deconstructed yet never random. Like Bell says: European tailoring mixed with a sense of American ease. Images curtesy of style.com.


Monochromic, structural, and minimal can all be the words that describe Neil Barrett Spring Summer 2015. Based in Milan while born in England, Neil Barrett is one of the leaders in minimalist menswear. Contrasting the usual flowy silhouettes, the strong presence of shorts, and the thinness of outerwear, the designer rotated the whole collection 360 degrees with dark colors, boxy jackets, and many pullovers. The vibe of spring only shows itself through the breath of the exposed ankles, along with the occasional sunglasses. The only yellow piece of the collection perhaps was the reminder for the February sun, when the cold still lingers. Lining the dark fabrics are metallic zippers and buttons, giving definitions to the already-defined cuts and seams. Barrett’s reinterpretation of the season is both exciting and odd. Rather, it’s refreshing to not see floral prints or anything sheer. Although the designs might be deemed safe, it’s very understandable for the designer to hold his shows in Milan as the clothes are minimally wearable and undeniably classic. Photos Courtesy of Style.com