Minimalissimo


Categorized “Fashion”

The Australian queens of staple wardrobe have done it again! Mary-Lou Ryan and Deborah Sams of Warriewood based label Bassike — spoken Basic — seem to get more distinctive with every collection they design. They effortlessly stick to the brand’s core business by creating a wardrobe of relaxed, minimal pieces, while at the same time implementing new ideas and a fresh styling for Spring/Summer 2014. It seems like some new colors and patterns were mixed into the current collection: Bassike’s signature neutral palette is carefully complemented with some earthy tones and patterns abstracted from classic menswear. The silhouettes are even more loose-fitting and oversized than before. However, the overall look is still luxurious and elaborate, which is probably due to the carefully chosen fabrics, mainly produced in Australia, Italy and France. So if you want to take your relaxed beach feeling downtown with style, Bassike’s SS2014 collection is definitely the right choice for hitting the bars and clubs.


One of world’s most prolific studios, Nendo, recently unveiled another beautiful minimalist design. Snap Glasses are made from light, flexible polycarbonate resin and envisioned for those of us who need reading and computer spectacles. When folded, they snap onto the nose supports (hence the name), which allows them to stay in place and create a thin profile. Another fun element is the interchangeable arms, that detach at the temples, so you can enjoy different colour combinations. The available colours are black, red, beige, grey, matte brown, matte green, matte blue and matte dark grey. Snap Glasses are  exclusively available from Seibu department stores.


British Fashion Designer Charlie May, advocate of minimalism since launching her first collection in 2010, keeps on refining her style with her immaculate A/W 14 collection. A bold but carefully designed black and white contrast plays well alongside monochrome looks, which come alive through the use of distinctly chosen fabric textures. The silhouettes range from feminine to Garconne, while the styling allows a thought of 50’s college girl attitude. Sharp outlines, classic pieces and a relaxed but very confident composure are the core ingredients to this immaculate collection. I really embrace Charlie May’s effortless style of comfortable yet intricate pieces, which should easily last many seasons. On the one hand there is a very personal handwriting in the way she designs her collection, on the other, every piece of the line should integrate well with any individual look of her customers. That is the craftsmanship of design in full bloom.


The launch of Australian label, Eska Alikai‘s AW 2014 collection by Micha Dyball consists of elegant, minimalist pieces that are indicative of both a confident presence as well as a pragmatic need for comfort. Her minimalist sensibilities are designed into soft leather, eco-friendly tencel, fleece, denim and cotton voile. The details of layering add a lot of personality into the clean, geometric pieces. I found this collection so appealing as each outfit is styled to celebrate the structure and fluidity in the mixed use of material and yet, it is easy to wear. Eska Alikai may be relatively new to deliver a full collection but the label has achieved much success in editorial exposure and already has an e-commerce site. I am looking forward to the next collection already. Images courtesy of Eska Alikai.


Restored is an Amsterdam based store that collects and sells unique products from talented designers and small labels, offering them a platform to share their products and visions with a wider public. An ode to beauty, balance and originality, Restored features a concise collection of simple, minimalist designs ranging from exquisite garments and accessories to wonderfully handcrafted household items — some of which you may already be familiar with, having previously been featured here on Minimalissimo. And today, we’re excited to share a few more with you. A store I would love to drop in on the next time I’m exploring the streets of Amsterdam, but for the time being, it’s a pleasure getting lost browsing their online shop. Restored are also kindly offering a 15% discount on all products until 30 June, using the code: ENJOYJUNE


Fusing traditional manufacturing with hi-tech fabrics while ensuring that the construction of the garments is not too heavy: that is what Sydney based designers Lyna Ty and Melvin Tanaya of Song for the Mute aimed for while designing their latest collection, GREY. And they most definitely hit the mark. Their darker, more tailored aesthetic goes along perfectly with new, younger, more relaxed sportswear elements. Clients familiar with Song for the Mute can still expect some signature silhouettes, but be prepared for a fresh twist on theses classic shapes. Crafted from virgin wool blends, alpaca and with further development of our paraffin and resin coated fabrics this seasons subsequent construction aims to heighten those tactile sensations. Showing the beautiful Autumn/Winter 2014 collection GREY at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Sydney, Song for the Mute further established their point of difference in the men’s market by being particularly fabric-driven. On top of that, American rapper and loyal friend of the brand Lupe Fiasco flew to Sydney to join the show for a runway appearance, highlighting Song for the Mute’s roots in contemporary independent pop culture.


Most of our readers must have remembered Dylan Cao, a young accessories designer based in New York, from our Inside Instagram feature. Now with a degree and the title Designer of The Year for Accessories Design from Parsons University, he is here again to showcase his awarded footwear collection. Simply coating in white, this series of minimal designs reflects the designer’s personal experience as a mental patient. The stark and pristine definition faithfully delivers the sterility of an institution; however in this case, sterility takes on many other layers of complexity. To contrast the monotony, the decision to include the metal heels, as a direct translation of the sterile stools at the facility, is rather clever. Not only that, but they also have a relation to the doctoral equipments, taking on different geometric shapes. The inclusion of screws creates machinery image while the interplay of leather panels gives a newness to the silhouettes. As a whole, it is an experimentation of form and structure, as well as color (or the lack thereof) and material. I especially enjoy the addition of the supporting leather strap on one of the sandals. Even without the apparent appearance of the metal legs, that line adds...


Amelie Riech’s Uncommon Matters series is a striking collection of idealistic future lines. The pieces are based on simplified geometric forms that supplement the users own style, using subtlety and an understated design philosophy. There is also a strong connection to the enduring craft techniques of the past with the construction of the pieces being well considered and constructed with exemplarily quality. Reich is based between both Berlin and Paris and her work is said to reflect a luminous energy that is reflected by the sleek, fluid surfaces of the pieces. There is also a timeless and sensuous manner to the way in which light interacts with the elements through movement. See list of stockists for all available pieces. Photography courtesy of Matthias Wingartner


Connected Magazine is a new contemporary fashion magazine that has just launched its first issue. As the brainchild of Nani Lim and Pontus Samuel, the magazine started of as a school project and evolved into a platform for the Stockholm-based duo to express their identical love for photography, fashion and design; a platform that celebrates the motivation of good design instead of mere current trends: There is a very one dimensional look on fashion today, which is basically “buy! buy! buy!”, and we felt that the function behind clothes sort of got lost in translation. The style of minimalism is the tool that is used to express their aesthetic and visual language both in the design of the magazine as well as the articles they feature. The images exude an appealing simplicity and the styling of the editorials are of a minimalistic elegance. The magazine communicates the team’s personal tastes and inspiration to their audience. I love the fact that it is so personal and shared in such a beautifully crafted and designed publication, which makes this project more meaningful. As the editor Nani Lim so eloquently sums up: Most of our inspiration comes from meeting creative people and the interaction...


Romanian studio Clean Everything recently produced their latest collection of simple, elegant, vegetable tanned leather goods titled, Trilogy. Sharp edges and sleek touches are the key inspiration and theme of this collection, which, as its title suggests, includes three pieces. The Triangle Folded Clutch is a simple and elegant clutch featuring a sleek folded design involving one piece of leather and one polished metal stud. Based on the classic Italian coin purses the triangle has been enlarged and cleaned up, transforming it into an entirely different and contemporary piece. The Triangle Folded Backpack is a stylish and innovative triangle shaped leather backpack with adjustable shoulder straps. Its uniqueness originates from the folding design using one piece of leather, manipulated into shape, and riveted together with two metal studs. The Stitchless Bag, crafted from two pieces of vegetable tanned leather with no stitches, is a minimalist shoulder bag that allows you to effortlessly carry your daily essentials with style. Each design is available in three colour variations — red, white and green. Photography by Robert Petreanu


With a French name and a Catalan heart, Deux Souliers is a Barcelona-based footwear brand led by designer Nunu Solsona, who also shares the creative direction with Folch Studio. Deux Soulier advocates a slow fashion spirit and a contemporary craft ideology, prioritizing comfort, quality and responsible manufacturing (every shoe is handmade in Menorca, Spain). The Spring/Summer ’14 collection de-contextualizes classic shoe designs, featuring sandal-shaped and often unisex models with a sophisticated sport aesthetic, and materials like cowhide or clean cotton provide subtle texture to their neutral-toned color palette. Albert Folch, creative director of Folch Studio, shared with us a bit of insight into the process behind the brand’s aesthetics, which he described as reductionist in itself. Deux Souliers means Two Shoes in French – simple as that, a simplicity that is at the core of every byproduct of the brand – from  beautifully crafted shoes to advertising campaigns, branding and online presence. The focus is the product, and every aesthetic decision revolves around featuring it in the most straightforward, best possible way. Nunu is also interested in maintaining open door sessions at their studio in order to maintain closeness with the client – in fact, it’s how I had the opportunity to experience first-hand the lovely ethos of the brand. Campaign photography by Teddy Iborra.


This collection of simple leather sleeves for Apple devices has been created by the Dutch company Mujjo. All pieces are simple, slim and at the same time provide enough room to carry your iThing plus a few extras. The iPhone and iPad cases are folded from a single piece of leather in such a way that there is an integrated pocket for your papers, cards, earphones and other essentials. The Macbook sleeves feature felt for extra padding. They have a compartment inside to fit your stuff. Here is how designers explain their vision: We obsessively try to keep it as simple as possible, while trying to make each part as good as possible, every stitch, every button, they have all been intensively thought out. While it’s not easy to keep things simple, it does pay off to create a product that is perfect in a sense of simplicity to that extent that you cannot leave anything away without compromising it’s intention. I love the functionality of these pieces. While slimming the lines, designers did not strip away the comfort. I would appreciate more colors though.