Minimalissimo


Categorized “Furniture”

Hocker Heinrich is a precise, elegant and minimalist stool, hand-made in Berlin and designed by Panatom with Matthias Froböse. The first edition of the stool has been appointed to the permanent collection at Kleist-Museum in Frankfurt (Oder). Its geometry produces an interesting effect on light and shadow, creating a game of shifting perspectives depending on the angle of observation. Comprised of concrete, the surface varies from piece to piece due to air pockets that develop during the setting process, giving each stool a unique appearance and making it one-of-a-kind. Available in anthracite or light grey, Hocker Heinrich can also be pigmented other colours upon request, and a dark grey stool cover can be added for more comfort. Lastly, the weatherproof character of concrete also renders the stool suitable for outdoors.


NYC Design Week 2015 saw the Rhode Island School of Design alumni Farrah Sit and Anna Lynett Moss from Chiyome, both New York-based product designers, collaborate on a beautifully light and elegant furniture collection. Rooted in an analysis of planar relationships and with a nod to design elements borrowed from fashion, the collection is a study of weightlessness and balancing opposites — line vs volume, bright vs muted, transparent vs opaque. Both designers became friends in the NY design scene through a mutual deep admiration for each others’ work and share a focus on thoughtful, considered and sustainable design with community engagement – this collaboration was an opportunity to explore such design philosophy on a larger scale. The collection was exhibited during NYCxDesign2015 at Colony, a furniture showroom that celebrates and showcases the community of independent designers in New York City. Photography by Christopher Saunders.


Nendo has created a new minimalist stool, named Float, for Moroso with a stunning visual effect: the gentle curved seating appears to float in the air as two of the four legs have been cut off. A really nice twist for an otherwise simple stool stat consists of four steel, powder coated pipe legs and a rectangular plywood seating. That is what I really like about the designs by Nendo; they always try to give people a small “!” moment. Nendo’s aim was to create a varied, comfortable, seating experience. By utilising the structure of the cantilever, that only supports the back legs, a cushioned feel has been given, he explains. Float is available as a high stool or as a shorter foot stool. I imagine the high Float stool perfect for a kitchen bar. The shorter Float stool can be a handy side chair in your living room. Maybe you even transform this shorter stool into a side table when not in use as a stool. Photography by Akihiro Yoshida.


Yiannis Ghikas’ Game of Trust Hanger is designed based on three interlocking, leaning elements. The Game of Trust itself is one based on trusting your partner, and falling into a position of support, reinforcing the strength of the connection. This Hanger plays up to this notion. Available in a number of painted or natural finishes, from solid wood, due to its composition, the piece is also modular in nature. Based out of Athens, Greece, Ghikas designed this piece based on three identical Y-shaped elements, each one supports and at the same time is supported by one of the others, resulting in an embrace that transformed the units into a unity. This in itself, the minimal composition of its elements, is beautiful. Photography courtesy of Nikos Alexopoulos.


During this year’s Milan Design Week, Frankfurt-based e15 company presented a plain and powerful new solid wood product family, compounded by the Fayland table, the Fawley bench and the Langley stool. Designed by the multi award-winning British architect David Chipperfield, the table was originally developed for Fayland House, a residential project in the English countryside, being essentially a modern farmhouse table. The family is made from European walnut and solid oak in oiled or white stained surfaces, and offered in black as well, highlighting the elegant silhouette. The material is used on its maximum expression to create a categorical yet elegant combination.


Cologne based design studio Kaschkasch created a slim wallmounted, foldable desk named Fju. Folded down you have a small workspace with a smooth writing surface. When you are done you just place your belongings in the storage pockets under the desk and fold up. Now the storage pockets are revealed and the desk has transformed into a shelf. Within seconds you create some extra space when needed. Fju consists of two main components: a steel bracket, mounted to the wall, and the wooden body made of 8mm thick veneered oak plywood. Fju comes naturally finished or dyed with charcoal. Like Fju the products of design studio Kaschkasch, founded Florian Kallus and Sebastian Schneider, are characterized by precise lines and geometric shapes.


Beller’s Equal seating ensemble personifies minimalism, emphasizing a sense of delicate sensibility. The collection is a set of chairs and stools all made from retracting wood in a tight grip of a single, seamless piece of cast metal. The philosophy of the strength between the relationships between objects, and people, is the basis for material selection and composition. The ash wood and the cast aluminum stand as these opposites, united in the Equal chair. Norway-based Lars Beller Fjetland studied at the Bergen National Academy of the Arts focusing on furniture, interiors and lighting, and his Norwegian coastal roots are clearly overt in his work. It is typical of the beautiful Scandinavian tone of combined considered tradition, restrained form and impeccable and seamless detailing. Equal is the spawn of this fascination with detail and a timeless aesthetic. Photography courtesy of Magne Sandnes.


Shiro Studio is a London based design practice established by Andrea Morgante, committed to the creation of unique architecture and objects. Shiro means ‘white’ in Japanese, but here it implies a philosophical translation where white is perceived as the purest creative approach. An approach which has seen the design of the award winning Nivis — a strikingly sleek and minimalistic bathroom sink for Italian manufacturer Agape. Nivis pays homage to the most intimate and fragile sculptural qualities of snow, its unblemished whiteness and deep blanket fallen on everyday objects. Comprised of white cristalplant, Nivis’s surface becomes a soft, fluid mass where water can seamlessly flow, from the main to the secondary basin by rotating the overflow hole on the horizontal plane.


Exhibited at this year’s Milan Design week this beautiful and minimalist collection of shelves and tables is designed by Japanese studio Nendo for Glas Italia. Slide is a collection that includes two shelving units, a counter unit and a pair of small side tables that express a “slide” of position by focusing on the technology that bonds glass to glass. One black sheet of glass is bonded in a way that it has slid from its original position. Nendo comments: The shelves are particularly challenging to develop, since the black glass that is sticking out has to be attached to a transparent glass using an extremely small area of the cross-section. The same materials are used for the cuboid tables, which have tops shifted away from their dark bases in a similar way. The tables look as though the surface on top of the black box has been opened in a slightly slid position. Extremely simple. I love the glass, which is a radical and pure material and the Slide collection interprets these characteristics perfectly. Photography by Kenichi Sonehara.


Milan Design Week is an interesting stage for cutting-edge innovations by newcomers, as well as a place for veterans to showcase their expectedly praise-worthy material. Although the press excitement is often directed for explicit solution-seeking projects; that would be ill-advised, because there is much to celebrate in new twists of traditional objects. Norm Architects unveils their new collaboration with Italian design brand Ex.t, stamping their usual world-class concepts and trustworthy minimalist sensibilities for a bathroom collection. It boils down to a simple metal structure, taking cues from the modernist style of the 1920’s and 30’s, the project reduces it all to very few geometric lines. The end-result is light and elegant looking, both unusual qualities for bathroom furnishings. The Stand bathtub and washbasin are impressive — they would fit perfectly as part of a Mies van der Rohe geometric house, a small and lean urban apartment or even a bucolic house in the country looking for a contemporary twist. The Felt modular wall unit plays off the eclectic potential for daily use in the bathroom, or throughout the house. Last but not least, the Hat lamp exposes the raw wood proudly. The new collection is yet another great addition to...


The Italian furniture company, Kristalia, fast becoming a Minimalissimo favourite, recently introduced to us the beautiful OXO family of chairs, designed by Xavier Lust, which will be on display at Milan Design Week later this month. Oxo is the outcome of both ongoing research by Kristalia to find new production technologies and Xavier Lust’s in-depth knowledge of aluminium. In this design project, the designer highlights the hallmarks that have made him famous: curves created by his innovative process of bending metal surfaces. A long time admirer of Lust’s work, this is Kristalia first collaboration with the designer, which has resulted in an exquisite and minimalistic collection of outdoor stackable chairs where the beauty lies in the details, such as the twist that is seen on the base, the torsion of the aluminium tube. Wonderful.


Japanese design firm Nendo is not only brilliant at creating beautiful products in any medium, but they are also good at getting featured on Minimalissimo. As a collaboration with Italian furniture maker Glas Italia, Nendo has created a series of three frosted glass tables for this year’s furniture fair in Milan. Although the description might sound simple, the overall aesthetic is much more complex due to the gradient hues of these tables’ edges. During the process of making these sculptural objects, bright strips of colors were applied onto the outer rims of each frosted panel, giving a visuality of neon tubes running along the seams of the cubes. Nendo lets us know: What is more, the reverse side of the frosted glass was printed with a pattern to make it look as though the same colors were blurred on the glass surface. That explains the name Soft. The dialogue between the pattern and the edge’s gradient is cleverly tailored to illusorily imply that these tables are glowing softly from the inside. One of the things that I absolutely love about Nendo is their design philosophy which challenges the way that we understand materials. By minimally designing and tweaking small elements...