Minimalissimo


Categorized “Furniture design”

Zeren Saglamer’s Grill is a beautiful combination of lines. The materiality and the expression of its composition, is beautiful. Described as a half solid surface and half cage-like table, this piece is available in both a carrara marble and wooden surface. The metal bands that accompany the solid surface also act as a hanging surface for reading material. Saglamer is located in Istanbul and has a background in Industrial Design and Fine Arts. Her works are a combination of furniture, industrial design products, interiors and lighting. She heads up XS Design studio with an ethos to create products and interiors that integrate form and function in harmony. Grill is available through Selectivism. Photography courtesy of XS Design.


Danish furniture manufacturer Askman, successfully collaborate with some of Denmark’s best contemporary designers. Along with their 100 years experience in woodworking — which offers the base foundation for all their products — Askman have produced these wonderfully minimal furniture pieces; Square, designed by Jørgen Møller. Having been designing for Askman for more than 25 years, Jørgen Møller has created a remarkable collection of elegant, functional and minimalistic products. His Square series is a brilliant example of his work, which includes a magazine holder, box, and a nest of tables. It’s the quiet simplicity and the one primary shape (square) used throughout these pieces that has the minimalist in me appreciating everything about Møller’s designs.


HALE is a part-design, part-production firm, founded by American industrial designer Jonathan Nesci. Having been previously featured on Minimalissimo back in 2010, you may already be familiar with the work of Nesci and HALE. If not, I am delighted to share this remarkable industrial furniture with you. Designs of pure simplicity and functionalism, each of these pieces are robust, and also appear to have a certain unfinished or unrefined appearance, which I personally find incredibly beautiful. From the honest, simple structures of the wall and floor shelves, to the superbly sleek bar stools, to the straight-edged form of the hall chair, each of these aluminium and steel pieces integrate the fundamental principles of good design reminiscent of Dieter Rams and Naoto Fukasawa’s work. I really admire HALE’s entire furniture collection and as I continue to design my own interior space, hopefully there will one day be one or two Nesci designs in there.


Macedonian design duo Natali Ristovska and Miki Stefanoski recently collaborated to produce Stripe — a multifunctional box that allows for a wide variety of configurations and forms. A single modular element is the essence of this lightweight storage and shelving box making it incredibly simple for you to design your own compositions. The designers write: Stripe boxes connect together to create customisable cube furniture. You can get even more creative by giving the Stripe a new function. An individual element can be perfectly suited as a storage box, table, transport box or seating at the same time. Perfect for people who move a lot! Stripe can also be installed and reconfigured in just a minute, with any number of units, anywhere. From rows of stacked shelving blocks to a simple little side table, I could certainly make great use of a white collection of these beautiful boxes throughout my home. Photography by Ani & Dimi.


Fade is a collection of vessels and furniture for the bathroom, created by Stockholm based designers John Astbury and Kyuhyung Cho. It consists of 13 pieces: a low ash table, ash and copper mirror, and a collection of ceramic trays and vessels in parian clay. Designers explain: Beginning with a period of research on the subject of bathing we began to view it as both ritual and a metaphor for the work. To see ritual and water as both a transforming element and a moment of reflection. This is the foundation for the collection. The aim was the representation of the invisible, of transformation within the objects.  I like the geometry within the objects, the subtle contrast between relaxed and constricted shapes in each volume. Designers say, that the shifting tones of the collection represent the view on bathing as a ceremony and nature as a transformative element. Photography by Stephanie Wiegner


Berlin based design studio New Tendency is an outstanding interdisciplinary endeavour following a deeply holistic approach towards furniture and accessories. The collection is a mix of original products and collaborations with selected designers. It is united by clear aesthetics and functional form as well as a consistent production strategy: Every product is crafted regionally. Most of our products are modular and/or stackable, therefore enabling efficiency in wrapping, storage, and transport. We also really care about the production of our products. We consider our products carriers of these values and believe that they also transmit these ideas. — (FvF Interview 13.01.2014) I love the conceptual context in which Sebastian Schönheit and Manuel Goller manage to combine super normal design with a very sensual impression. It is a great pleasure to touch and work with objects like the floor lamp December or the side table Meta.


P-11 is a minimalist, polygon shaped chair designed by Maxim Scherbakov. A beautiful chair for a modern interior. The main goal was to create a chair with complex polygonal shapes simple to manufacture without using any fasteners. The white lacquered metal frame gives a solid and reliable base for the plywood triangle shaped segments that form the seat and back. The plywood segments are glued together. Between each segment there is a narrow opening that continues to the armrests and legs. The lacquered metal gives a nice contrast with the plywood emphasising the lines cutting across seat and back. Maxim Scherbakov is one of the founders of Plan—S23, a St. Petersburg based design studio focusing on furniture, product and interior design.


Mamba, by Bulgarian designer Victor Vasilev for MDF Italia is more than a shelf. It’s a perfect combination of shape, function and material, a unique mix of a shelf, a console and a desk with a LED light source which creates a new kind of furnishing. Mamba is a new concept of furniture comprised of Cristaplant, that fits into a modern domestic space with a unique image, sensual to the eye and to the touch that seems to materialize from the wall and then vanishes. In 2013, two years after the launch of Mamba, Mamba Light was created. A sober hanging desk or a decorative shelf that lends itself to different uses and home environments — from the living room to the studio. Mamba Light is a shelf-desk cabinet made of medium-density wood fiberboard, with variable thickness, curved mold, matt white, green, orange, blue, sand, ivory, yellow and gray coated finish. The basic shape gives the product a unique design and identity of a strong iconic character.


Paolo Ulian is an awarded Italian designer who has an artistry background. With a collaborated blood, he recently produced a series of seven items made of unwanted materials with Moreno Ratti. As a part of the Marble Weeks 2014, the two have created a collection of furniture and housing utilities with scrapped marble tiles. There is a toy-like factor to these designs since they are put together from individual pieces cut by water jet. By giving the materials slots and notches, there is an instant recognization of assembly without any confusion. According to the standardization of the cuts, the final forms hold a mix of modern and minimal aesthetics. The series contains a lamp called Ratti, a layered tool, a table named SfridO, the O-ring bowl, the +O- Lamp, the Piet fruit bowl, and the Gerla vase. For some of the items, the trick of stacking creates volumes to these initially flat marble panels. Perhaps I was always intrigued with the patterns of the marbles that I decided to write about this collection. But perhaps not only so. The sustainable decision of the two designers to give these discarded pieces a second life is somewhat heroic. With that thought, these...


Beam armchair is a minimalist design created by the Netherlands based studio Oato in collaboration with woodworking company Kuperus & Gardenier. The piece has been inspired by stacked beam structures used in many cultures. Designers explain their process: All the structural elements are squared, like wooden construction beams. All parts that involve sitting or touching are rounded and have different profiles accenting their own character and role. The price of the chair is quite approachable, especially considering the fact that it is mostly handmade. Another important achievement by the designers… The piece is made of oak with natural oil finish.


Swedish designer Thomas Sandell celebrates the beauty of marble with his Melt Bookcase. Originally from Finland, his architectural and design background has found him responsible for numerous subtle minimalist industrial design pieces. The piece was produced for the Marsotto Edizioni collection, and is made from white carrara marble, with a matt polished finish. The piece is also available in a black marble, and measures 70cm x 37cm x 90cm high. Since graduating with his Masters in Architecture, Sandell has been challenging the conventional design business model. His work includes several acclaimed interiors, contributing to a portfolio of commercial and residential work with gusto. His industrial pieces have also seen mass acclaim throughout Europe, and rightly so, together with a healthy body of international published work. Photography courtesy of Miro Zagnoli.


In 1958 Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni designed the Babela Chair for the Milan Chamber of Commerce. The brothers created a light-weight chair with minimal clearance. One can easily move the chair, stack it and create long, straight, rows. The Italian contemporary furniture brand Tacchini adopted the 1950′s design in 2010. Unlike the original chair the frame is not made of iron but of Ash timber, available with a white, black, grey, walnut or natural finish. The seat features a removable cover and may be upholstered with fabric and leather. The Castiglioni brothers playfully explored new possibilities for form and created highly functional objects that are as aesthetically satisfying as they were practical. A timeless classic!