Minimalissimo


Categorized “Chair”

UK-based Industrial Facility introduces the Branca Chair and its younger brother, the Branca Stool. Conceived together with the well-respected Italian Mattiazzi as their client, the brief was to design a chair that turned to nature, where complexity thrives on reason, where beauty is simply a reason for constant growth. Available in black, white, green and a natural ash, both pieces are a collaboration on dedication to craftsmanship. The stool features a low back, a subtle element, together with a metal footrest for durability. Industrial Facility is a firm that works with international companies of all sizes in a wide ranging set of industries. Their portfolio extends beyond the original plan of industrial design products, and now reaches to collaborations in interiors, public furniture, medical devices and exhibitions. Formed in 2002, their work is based on exploring the junction between industrial design and the world around us. The resulting pieces are beautiful, clean and express function but in a quiet unassuming way. I like this. Photography courtesy of Industrial Facility.


Swedish design studio, Form Us With Love, who’s incredible studio space in Stockholm we featured a few years ago, have recently designed this beautiful stool with clean-cut lines, interrupted by a recess that serves as a footrest, which brings to mind the cutting of a tree trunk, ‘fura’ in Swedish. Designed for Italian furniture and lighting brand, Plust, the Fura stool is matched with the Fura table, both of which express rational, clean and geometric forms. The Fura furniture, comprised of polyethylene, is available in a variety of colours that include white, rosemary, sandy, ashen, and pearl black. Brilliantly simple garden furniture.


From one of Japan’s luminaries of simplicity, Tokyo-based design studio Nendo, comes a delightfully ethereal furniture collection created for Italian company Desalto, known for their metal furniture. The wonder of the collection lies precisely in the fluid, light way the hard steel is worked, bent as naturally as if it were paper, as described by Nendo. By adding flipped, bent and wrapped details to metal sheets and rods, the ordinarily hard material gains new functionality and a light, flexible feel, as though the metal has become paper or cloth. The collection comprises three benches, a chair, a family of small tables, a coat rack and a family of wall shelves. Imagery courtesy of Desalto.


HALE is a part-design, part-production firm, founded by American industrial designer Jonathan Nesci. Having been previously featured on Minimalissimo back in 2010, you may already be familiar with the work of Nesci and HALE. If not, I am delighted to share this remarkable industrial furniture with you. Designs of pure simplicity and functionalism, each of these pieces are robust, and also appear to have a certain unfinished or unrefined appearance, which I personally find incredibly beautiful. From the honest, simple structures of the wall and floor shelves, to the superbly sleek bar stools, to the straight-edged form of the hall chair, each of these aluminium and steel pieces integrate the fundamental principles of good design reminiscent of Dieter Rams and Naoto Fukasawa’s work. I really admire HALE’s entire furniture collection and as I continue to design my own interior space, hopefully there will one day be one or two Nesci designs in there.


P-11 is a minimalist, polygon shaped chair designed by Maxim Scherbakov. A beautiful chair for a modern interior. The main goal was to create a chair with complex polygonal shapes simple to manufacture without using any fasteners. The white lacquered metal frame gives a solid and reliable base for the plywood triangle shaped segments that form the seat and back. The plywood segments are glued together. Between each segment there is a narrow opening that continues to the armrests and legs. The lacquered metal gives a nice contrast with the plywood emphasising the lines cutting across seat and back. Maxim Scherbakov is one of the founders of Plan—S23, a St. Petersburg based design studio focusing on furniture, product and interior design.


Beam armchair is a minimalist design created by the Netherlands based studio Oato in collaboration with woodworking company Kuperus & Gardenier. The piece has been inspired by stacked beam structures used in many cultures. Designers explain their process: All the structural elements are squared, like wooden construction beams. All parts that involve sitting or touching are rounded and have different profiles accenting their own character and role. The price of the chair is quite approachable, especially considering the fact that it is mostly handmade. Another important achievement by the designers… The piece is made of oak with natural oil finish.


In 1958 Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni designed the Babela Chair for the Milan Chamber of Commerce. The brothers created a light-weight chair with minimal clearance. One can easily move the chair, stack it and create long, straight, rows. The Italian contemporary furniture brand Tacchini adopted the 1950’s design in 2010. Unlike the original chair the frame is not made of iron but of Ash timber, available with a white, black, grey, walnut or natural finish. The seat features a removable cover and may be upholstered with fabric and leather. The Castiglioni brothers playfully explored new possibilities for form and created highly functional objects that are as aesthetically satisfying as they were practical. A timeless classic!


Pedrali, an Italian multi-disciplinary design firm established in 1963, has recently launched their newest furniture collection that showcases their collaborative ethics with innovative thinkers. With a series of wooden and upholstered products, the functionality gives rise to designs that are both fun and simple. With notable seating items such as “Snow Junior” by Odo Fioravanti; “Log” by Manuela Busetti, Andrea Garuti, and Matteo Redaelli;  “Tivoli” by Cazzaniga, Mandelli, and Pagliarulo; and “Zippo” by Pedrali R&D; they apparently show the way of integrating technology into craft, quality, and materiality. “Parenthesis” by Claudio Dondoli and Marco Pocci consists of three different coffee tables with quirky shapes and a tongue-in-cheek set of round brackets. “Flag” By Pio and Tito Toso is a variety of coat hangers that are both sleek and unconventional. All of the objects mentioned above combined to be a colorfully minimal collection and adds a punch of personality to one’s home, while still maintain an exuding elegance. Minimalism doesn’t mean simply black and white, but it means functionality over aesthetic; this 2014 furniture set of Pedrali proved that effectively. And the way these products are displayed is just a cherry on top to this wonderfully curated showcase.


Armada armchair has been created by Croatia-based designer Zoran Jedrejcic. The base of the piece is comprised of a steel frame covered in wood, and the seat features a thin steel layer covered in high quality leather. This combination gives Armada the structural integrity it needs while preserving the weightless appearance. I love how sculpturesque and beautifully balanced the piece looks. Additional elements, such as cushions, upholstery and back support, can be added to Armada via magnets. Different types of leather and wood are available. The chair can also be made to order and accommodate custom measurements.


Menu has just launched the Chair #01  at the Salone Satellite in Milan this week. Designed by Stockholm studio Afteroom, the beautiful chair has a minimal solid-steel structure with three legs and back support and seat comprised of oak. Afteroom’s Hung-Ming Chen explains: The Afteroom Chair is an homage to Bauhaus and functionalism. The simplicity of its design combined with the quality of materials is what’s important. It is based on the concept of reducing the amount of materials to the minimum and by doing so pushing the aesthetic appearance to the maximum. The chair is available in black and white, and the collection also includes a stackable side table and a stoneware caddy.


REN is a beautiful laconic creation of Japanese studio Karimoku New Standard. Inspired by traditional Japanese seating, this chair has a square frame and a low backrest. Designers claim that this shape and the position of the back promote healthy posture. I love how well thought out the piece is. Each part of a wooden frame is assembled using the traditional Japanese woodwork technique tomegata sanmai tsugi, or Triple Tenon. This principle allows to achieve a sturdy construction without the use of toxic adhesives. REN comes in two different frame colours and offers three choices of upholstery – paper yarn, textile and leather.


This beautiful collection has been created by Netherlands based designer Benjamin Vermeulen. Called MAG (Magnetic Assisted Geometry), the line consists of three flat-packed pieces that can be assembled with magnets without the use of tools. The furniture, made from high-quality steel and wood, snaps together without any effort. Here is how designer describes his vision: My goal is to design for people. But that doesn’t necessarily mean mass production, I rather design something amazing than have something mass produced. Another goal of mine is to make simple designs that people instantly understand how to use. Another interesting aspect of this collection is the fact that it is customizable. The cabinet allows you to to select components based on the configuration you need. You can change front, select number of shelves, attach extra elements and so forth. And you can take everything apart in seconds for storage or transportation. A nice idea for a nomadic lifestyle.