Minimalissimo


Categorized “Dining table”

London based designer Benjamin Hubert in collaboration with Canadian woodworking firm Corelam created this beautiful table, called Ripple. Made entirely from 3 ply 0.8mm birch aircraft plywood, Ripple is quite possibly the world’s lightest timber table of its size. The piece is 2.5 metres long, 1 metre wide, and weighs just 9 kilograms. The impressive strength to weight ratio is achieved by corrugating plywood and using it as a main material in this project. Designer explains: Ripple is minimal in its design language, employing a simple knockdown construction. The top surface is corrugated plywood overlaid by a flat sheet, and the A-frame legs are a sandwich construction of two corrugated plywood layers. There is also an eco-friendly aspect to this design. Thanks to its clever construction, Ripple takes 70-80% less material than a standard timber table. Check out the video to see the making of the piece.


Joshua Browne created a clever and minimalist dinning table for people living in small flats with little or limited space. The dining table, named TTable, can allow for both one person to dine alone or, with the extension, accommodate for visitors. TTable is a non mechanical table with a sheet of lacquered metal that simply glides over the existing maple wooden table, hiding it when extra table top is not needed. When fully extended the sheet metal drops onto a lower part of the table removing the lip between the two surfaces.


Ever since Marsotto, a reputable stone carving company from Italy collaborated with Milan-based industrial designer James Irvine to launch their first collection at the Marmomacc Fair, the largest stone fair worldwide back in 2009, a consistently beautiful series of marble furniture has been created out of elegant, minimalist forms. These reflect the structural integrity of the material and the natural beauty of its color and texture. These are my favorite from Irvine in the Marsotto edizioni collection. Very often, marble happens only as a detail on an object because of its cost, but I’d imagine that to design with marble from the start is to think about function and form unilaterally, exploiting the strength of the material and its sculptural attributes while taking measures to prevent wastage. The white Carrera marble is an old material that has been beautifully transformed into contemporary objects in this series.


Paolo Lucidi and Luca Pevere of LucidiPevere Design Studio have created Boiacca, a beautiful dining table for Kristalia. Made entirely of cement, the piece carries a strong architectural identity. Designers took the material to its absolute limit, striving to sustain a minimal form and back it up with superior structural integrity. The fulcrum of the project are the four legs which, as if they were molded in plastic, thanks to the patient work of “material reduction” and the use of special steel inserts, reach a great thinness. In addiction to these, the 13 mm thick top, as well concrete, which is perfectly flat with high resistance to bending. I really like the contrast between the slick and elegant form of the table and the roughness of the material. The piece is element-resistant and can be used both indoors and outdoors.


Milan based industrial designer Sakura Adachi created Trick, a bookcase which can be transformed into a console table with two chairs. Adachi, born in Aichi – Japan, studied at the Musashino Art University in Industrial and Craft Design, specializing in woodwork, and moved to London afterward to completed her MA in Industrial Design at Saint Martins College of Art & Design. Trick is a perfect furniture piece to fulfill your everyday activities in a small environment. Moving both sides of the bookcase from their original positions they become chairs and the center part becomes a table ideal to use for office work and dining.


This table, dubbed Herr Erich (Mister Eric), was designed by Simone Korte of Swiss design agency Form2. Even though it stretches up to 3 meters or 10 foot in length, the Herr Erich is a very solid table, thanks to it ingenious design – which doesn’t use a single bolt or screw. Pretty amazing.


This is a table. A Very Slim Table, to be precise. Its designer, Nilly Landao from Israel, reduced the table to just a wooden strip. Instead of putting plates on the surface, you attach them to the sides of the strip. Hard to imagine? Check out the video on Landao’s website, or click on for stills from that video.