Minimalissimo


Categorized “Table”

Exhibited at this year’s Milan Design week this beautiful and minimalist collection of shelves and tables is designed by Japanese studio Nendo for Glas Italia. Slide is a collection that includes two shelving units, a counter unit and a pair of small side tables that express a “slide” of position by focusing on the technology that bonds glass to glass. One black sheet of glass is bonded in a way that it has slid from its original position. Nendo comments: The shelves are particularly challenging to develop, since the black glass that is sticking out has to be attached to a transparent glass using an extremely small area of the cross-section. The same materials are used for the cuboid tables, which have tops shifted away from their dark bases in a similar way. The tables look as though the surface on top of the black box has been opened in a slightly slid position. Extremely simple. I love the glass, which is a radical and pure material and the Slide collection interprets these characteristics perfectly. Photography by Kenichi Sonehara.


Japanese design firm Nendo is not only brilliant at creating beautiful products in any medium, but they are also good at getting featured on Minimalissimo. As a collaboration with Italian furniture maker Glas Italia, Nendo has created a series of three frosted glass tables for this year’s furniture fair in Milan. Although the description might sound simple, the overall aesthetic is much more complex due to the gradient hues of these tables’ edges. During the process of making these sculptural objects, bright strips of colors were applied onto the outer rims of each frosted panel, giving a visuality of neon tubes running along the seams of the cubes. Nendo lets us know: What is more, the reverse side of the frosted glass was printed with a pattern to make it look as though the same colors were blurred on the glass surface. That explains the name Soft. The dialogue between the pattern and the edge’s gradient is cleverly tailored to illusorily imply that these tables are glowing softly from the inside. One of the things that I absolutely love about Nendo is their design philosophy which challenges the way that we understand materials. By minimally designing and tweaking small elements...


Kristalia, an Italian furniture design studio, has designed a new version of the stunning Thin-K table, introducing the minimalistic Thin-K Longo Outdoor table. It features a top that is not only very thin but also considerably long: almost 3 metres. Kristalia wanted to create an extremely long top reaching a truly impressive length while maintaining perfect linearity and sturdiness. To achieve this result, the legs and the under-top frame have been strengthened, but these details have been concealed. In order to perfectly finish tops of 120cm x 295cm dimensions, an ad hoc procedure has been developed, in which the under-top frame acts as a support during the lacquering stage — this is carried out using epoxy powders that are UV-ray resistant and weatherproof. The aluminium top is available in a choice of coloured lacquers, or in European oak or black oak wood veneer with a brushed finish that highlights its natural grain. Thin-K Longo is almost entirely made of aluminium, with the addition of a few steel components. Remarkable work.


IKEA has recently launched Sinnerlig, a collaboration with London designer Ilse Crawford from Studioilse, on a range of cork and natural-fibre homeware products prominently featuring neutral colours that were chosen to fit into any home. In Crawford’s words: It’s supposed to work in a bathroom in Mumbai as well as a kitchen in Neasden, it has to fit into people’s lives. It is quite low key but we deliberately designed it like that, we see it as background, it’s not trying to compete with these fantastic icons of design — it’s a different thing. Set against the beautiful backdrop of Ett Hem hotel, also designed by Studioilse, the collection contains a range of around 30 products, from larger furniture pieces such as cork-covered tables and a daybed down to hand-blown glass bottles. The collection was unveiled during Stockholm Design Week and will be available in stores in August.


One of the newest pieces from minimalist favorite Norm Architects is the Snaregade Table. The design is available in two forms: rectangular and round. Both variants feature a smooth, dark surface and intersecting supports. The table legs bring unique styling to the piece without sacrificing functionality. Each support is placed at just the right height and angle to maximize space for legs and chairs. The tables’ versatile aesthetic and practical design make them perfect for dining or as a workspace. A Snaregade table can easily be the focal point of a space, or it can delicately blend with its surroundings. I love when I come across a design that is truly an example of form follows function. The role of a table warrants certain operational elements. Yet it is the way these elements come together that defines a stand-out and timeless design.


Swedish design studio, Form Us With Love, who’s incredible studio space in Stockholm we featured a few years ago, have recently designed this beautiful stool with clean-cut lines, interrupted by a recess that serves as a footrest, which brings to mind the cutting of a tree trunk, ‘fura’ in Swedish. Designed for Italian furniture and lighting brand, Plust, the Fura stool is matched with the Fura table, both of which express rational, clean and geometric forms. The Fura furniture, comprised of polyethylene, is available in a variety of colours that include white, rosemary, sandy, ashen, and pearl black. Brilliantly simple garden furniture.


Prism mirror table is a remarkable project developed by the Tokyo based designer Tokujin Yoshioka for Glas Italia, a historic manufacturer of glass furniture with a long standing tradition. The table is comprised of thick high-transparency mirror glass, and it was made possible using innovative cutting techniques. Yoshioka explains: With the cut technique on glass surface, it gives off clear and miraculous sparkling expressed by the refraction of light like a prism. This piece is a table like a shimmering sculpture reflecting the view of surroundings as if water surface be. This simple and poetic result was presented during the last Salone del Mobile in Milan.


Macedonian design duo Natali Ristovska and Miki Stefanoski recently collaborated to produce Stripe — a multifunctional box that allows for a wide variety of configurations and forms. A single modular element is the essence of this lightweight storage and shelving box making it incredibly simple for you to design your own compositions. The designers write: Stripe boxes connect together to create customisable cube furniture. You can get even more creative by giving the Stripe a new function. An individual element can be perfectly suited as a storage box, table, transport box or seating at the same time. Perfect for people who move a lot! Stripe can also be installed and reconfigured in just a minute, with any number of units, anywhere. From rows of stacked shelving blocks to a simple little side table, I could certainly make great use of a white collection of these beautiful boxes throughout my home. Photography by Ani & Dimi.


Fade is a collection of vessels and furniture for the bathroom, created by Stockholm based designers John Astbury and Kyuhyung Cho. It consists of 13 pieces: a low ash table, ash and copper mirror, and a collection of ceramic trays and vessels in parian clay. Designers explain: Beginning with a period of research on the subject of bathing we began to view it as both ritual and a metaphor for the work. To see ritual and water as both a transforming element and a moment of reflection. This is the foundation for the collection. The aim was the representation of the invisible, of transformation within the objects.  I like the geometry within the objects, the subtle contrast between relaxed and constricted shapes in each volume. Designers say, that the shifting tones of the collection represent the view on bathing as a ceremony and nature as a transformative element. Photography by Stephanie Wiegner


Up in the air is a striking occasional table for home and contract use, developed by Ramón Úbeda and Otto Canalda for the Spanish company Viccarbe. The white lacquered cylindrical table is also made from a patented environment-friendly resin that contains handmade fish replicas, therefore no need of additional decoration than themselves. The designers explain: Fish that aren’t fish. That seem to float in water that isn’t water. They seem to be suspended in air that isn’t air. Like a dream. A wonderful mixture between minimalism and poetry is the result of this charming project, that is available in different versions of fish compositions and table sizes.


This beautiful collection has been created by Netherlands based designer Benjamin Vermeulen. Called MAG (Magnetic Assisted Geometry), the line consists of three flat-packed pieces that can be assembled with magnets without the use of tools. The furniture, made from high-quality steel and wood, snaps together without any effort. Here is how designer describes his vision: My goal is to design for people. But that doesn’t necessarily mean mass production, I rather design something amazing than have something mass produced. Another goal of mine is to make simple designs that people instantly understand how to use. Another interesting aspect of this collection is the fact that it is customizable. The cabinet allows you to to select components based on the configuration you need. You can change front, select number of shelves, attach extra elements and so forth. And you can take everything apart in seconds for storage or transportation. A nice idea for a nomadic lifestyle.


The 7 Möbelstücke collection is an inspiring collaboration between a designer, Herbert Schultes, and a craftsman, Friedrich Reich. Both men had the intent to explore new ways to produce wooden objects, furniture pieces, using modern production methods, but taking mass production out of the equation. In their quest they focused on what was essential to the sitting experience of a chair and stripped back the other elements. The result is a minimalist, pretty basic, collection that consists of a chair, two stools, two tables a desk and a bread case made of European maple, American maple and oak. Frank furniture pieces made with attention for detail. Have a look at how the wood pieces run into each other, the bevel joints, etc. All furniture pieces are produced on request and can be purchased directly through Herbert Schultes Design.