Minimalissimo


Categorized “Poster”

Systems is an exhibition of commissioned poster designs and ‘60s Braun products, presented in a single grid at the Walter Knoll London showroom from 25 Nov – 31 Dec 2013. The exhibition is curated by das programm and produced in association with Braun. An international group of graphic designers respond to the systematicity of Braun Design, each one of them notably minimalist, such as Experimental Jetset, Hey Studio, Ross Gunter, Antonio Carusone, Spin, Tomasz Berezowski, Spin and more. Featured here is Berlin–based studio Neubau‘s series of posters, exploring the concepts of Form, Typography and Colour. Find out more about each poster and the specific concept developed in each design. All the works are available for purchase as a limited edition of A1 prints, individually or as a cased set. I’d love one in my living room!


Edition One is a series of minimalist pastel toned linework on rich metallic paper. The pastel colors, printed with matte ink, give a nice contrast with the background and throughout the day the appearance will change by the light. Like the name says Edition One is the first edition of metallic prints by Yield. The series is produced in a limited edition of 100 pieces. Yield was founded in 2012 by Rachel Gant and Andrew Deming. The co-founders met at California College of the Arts, where Gant studied Industrial Design and Deming studied Design Strategy.


This creative public service campaign was designed by Caroline Brickell of Ogilvy & Mather Gurgaon ad agency for WWF India. The series, titled Animal Trees, consists of three works featuring rounded silhouettes of threes placed to form a panda, bear, and hippo. By making trees look like endangered animals, the advertising makes the point that wildlife and the environment are interconnected. I love the optic illusion the posters create, making our eye to see the animals first and notice the trees only after reading the tagline. What a beautiful and provocative way to conway the message.  The campaign received the Design Gold Pencil award in the Public Service / Posters category at The One Show.


The contemporary cycling culture is really easy to embrace these days with beautiful graphic and packaging designs like James Greig, who is behind the clean and elegant brand and site, Cyclelove. It is a refreshing site that is actually less about bicycles and more about people and their bicycle lifestyles. And after I have spent too much time going through the photostream of all bike related images, the features on all bicycle paraphernalia, I found the perfect gift for fellow minimalist design-loving, bicycle-riding enthusiasts in this simple ‘Just Ride’ limited edition print of abstracted bicycle frames by Greig on heavyweight matt black paper with a white gloss ink, hand-numbered, and packaged in a custom CycleLove poster tube.


Amsterdam-based graphic designer and illustrator Tim Boelaars has a series of limited-edition screenprints based on his sets of icons for everyday use, printed as different colored posters of 18” x 24”. Tim has drawn a lot of attention to his unique iconography work, with an established technique of bold, geometric, monospaced line work that illustrates a range of whimsical yet quirky commonplace things (well, except for the weaponry series). While each and every object may not be absolutely minimalistic in their portrayal, the arrangement of the icons in a monochromatic, perfectly ordered and straightforward fashion is very elegantly simple. Photography by Tim Boelaars, featured image from The Noun Project.


Chicago based architect and designer Jermome Daksiewicz of Nomo is the mind behind this unusual series of screen prints of airport runways. One for the airport enthusiast perhaps, but these precise screen prints present interesting industrial patterns with an attractive simplicity to them. The continually growing series in which new suggestions can be made, include such runways as John F. Kennedy International Airport, Los Angeles International Airport, and London Heathrow Airport and measure 18″ x 24″ in size. Something a little different, but I like them.


This collection of pictogram history posters was designed by H-57 creative agency as a part of their collaborative project with the website First Floor Under. The posters are designers’ take on famous biographies, real and fictional, expressed in not more than three or four steps. Thus, the lives of Michael Jackson, Hitler, Darth Vader, Jesus, Marie Antoinette, Napoleon, Bruce Lee and Caesar were summarized in a pictographic and humorous way. And, according to H-57, more similar works are coming: We want to create many of them to give our point of view on the most famous world stories. Unfortunately, the ones with tragic ending are the funniest and most interesting. With the popularity of typography and infographics on the rise, we see a lot of movie and music posters, art and literary works getting beautiful minimalist makeovers. These H-57 historic strips are a noteworthy addition to the array of inspiring designs.


London based graphic designer Genis Carreras (or ‘gex’ as he likes to call himself) has created a series of minimalist and witty Philosophy Posters. The project is an attempt to explain complex philosophical theories through basic shapes. Carreras offers his take on such ideas as solipsism, humanism, determinism, absolutism, relativism, nihilism and many others. These aesthetically pleasing pieces are also aiming for an educational value, which is why each poster includes a brief summery of the philosophical notion. There is also a book in the works, called Philographics, in which all these posters are compiled for one very short read. Who knows, maybe minimalism is all we need to make other ‘isms’ easier to grasp…


Swedish illustrator and graphics designer Patrik Svensson has created a fantastically minimalist series of typography posters. The project is a visualisation of various movies by using only letters from title or other typography characters. Svensson explains what he wanted to achieve from the series: I have always been a fan of designers that integrate with the viewer to create a sort of game together. I always strive to leave some space for the viewer to fill. It’s a balancing act. The humour is also very important – graphics without a sense of humour is often dead to me. Personally, The Karate Kid, The Matrix and Basic Instinct are the stand-out designs for me.


Six Architects is a series of minimalist posters showing the major architects and main principles of modern architecture. Conceived and created by artist Andrea Gallo. Check the posters of Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Alvar Aalto and Walter Gropius. Which one do you prefer?


One of our readers just sent this in: British designer Patrick Smith (a.k.a. Graphic Patrick) made some pretty nice minimalist posters about mental disorders. Apparently, Smith was doing some research about mental health when he came across a list of mental disorders and got inspired. My personal pref goes out to Agoraphobia. Yours? (Thx, Stefano!)


Inspired by the 83rd edition of the Academy Awards airing today, here is a series of minimalist posters created by graphic designer David Lopez, one for each Best Picture Oscar nominee. David tried to find and use a key element from each movie to represent the film as a whole. Despite my personal wishes for Black Swan to succeed, my favorite poster was the one for Inception.