Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

Simon Legald’s Pocket for Normann Copenhagen adds a niche, literally, to any space. Made from Polypropylene, available in six colours, these pockets add an element of storage that goes beyond the traditional. Purposely designed to not add any unnecessary details, these are Scandinavian chic. There is an over emphasis on the function, with a streamlined and uncluttered aesthetic. Designed to be dishwasher safe, the mounting bracket is completely hidden once the Pocket organiser has been mounted. At Normann Copenhagen, they love to challenge the design rules and find traditional materials put into untraditional use. The Pocket is no exception; it is a celebration of these values. Photography courtesy of Normann Copenhagen.


It’s time to put music back into our daily lives, simply and beautifully. Audio accessories brand, Aether, have designed a music player that thinks. Cone is a wireless speaker with voice recognition technology that takes your requests and learns your tastes. It understands artists, albums and songs, so when you know exactly what you want to hear, just ask. Cone’s design carefully considers the human hand. Its dial is easy to turn in one palm, and when you change the song or genre you will feel it fall into place with a soft, magnetic snap. With eight hours of battery life, Cone is engineered to deliver impressively rich, detailed audio through a 3” woofer and 20-watt amplifier. As you may also expect, Cone supports AirPlay and Bluetooth connectivity. Beyond its impressive technical attributes, Cone has a wonderful aesthetic that features a smooth, minimalist design and is available in two colours: black & copper, and white & silver.


Swiss studio Mizko Design are the creators of this elegant and simple decorative home accessory — a maple wood bird called Woodput. Natural and clean, strong and unagitated, it is produced in small series by a local sheltered workshop in Aurau, Switzerland. The designers explain: The aim was to create a decorative object from a piece of wood with as few oscillated slices as possible. We wanted to experiment with how much you can reduce the shape so that the object is still identifiable as a bird. Woodput is meant to be an object, that tries to convince with its simplicity. Mizko Design was founded in 2012 by Sarah Hügin and Benedikt Löwenstein, two industrial designers, who’s collaborative efforts have seen them awarded a Red Dot Award in product design.


The Zorro by Stephanie Knust, brings new meaning to linear illumination. This piece is a beautiful composition of bent metal and the latest in illumination technology combined. The lines, or one line, of this piece are just exquisite. Seamlessly bringing together the function and form of the industrial piece, this would be a very welcome piece in any living space, adding to and creating a space. Stephanie Knust is based in Germany and her work is a collection of industrial design pieces, ranging from seating, lighting and other tabletop accessories. He work is both typically German and bolt of nature and this piece, the Zorro seems to fit within this portfolio and also show a growth in her design aesthetic in a direction of a more refined form work. Zorro is reliant on its environment to interact with. It isn’t a self-standing object, which in a way is a creative way of engaging the objects that light the space, with the actual space. I appreciate the creativity. Photography courtesy of Stephanie Knust.


California based Brad and Jenna Holdgrafer have always appreciated owning less. The idea of buying one high quality product over many average ones, lead to the couple creating Yes — an online store selling beautiful, thoughtful and well-designed lifestyle accessories. Furthermore, their store has a strong minimalist aesthetic, featuring many products I would personally love to have in my home. Whether that is the Drip Kettle by Hario, the Cast Iron Tea Candle Holder by Naft, or the Cork Boat by Materia. With a concise collection of everyday items, superbly selected, Yes have successfully created a shopping experience that encourages you to buy less, but when you have to buy, buy better. Not just minimal design, a minimal way of living. Check out the full range of products →


Poetic Lab’s Shadow Clock is an opposing composition of contractions. Subtle in size, when illuminated and in use, it transforms into a bold installation element. The Shadow Clock indicates the changing of time, through the use of light and reflection and refraction on the environmental issues to which it is installed; namely the wall. The pre-existing lighting therefore also plays a role in this expression of its function. London-based studio Poetic Lab, headed by Hanhsi Chen and Shikai Tseng, the collaboration has seen the joining of design philosophies, whereby the central spine of their design is that of poetry of objects and materials. Initially designed in 2012, this piece is 520mm high and 400mm in depth from the fixed surface, the Shadow Clock is made from Aluminium Alloy and stainless steel. Its interaction and dependency on its environment is particularly engaging. While the nod to the traditional sundial clock is obvious, this interpretation is very much welcomed. Photography courtesy of Poetic Lab.


The magnet stripe bar is created by Seiji Oguri and Yohei Oki, founders of id inc. The minimalist bar, part of the Magnet collection by id inc., is a holder for the alternately hidden magnets. Firstly for the magnets, secondly — when a magnet is pulled out — for paper notes or photos. Each magnet can be pulled out and placed in a preferred place. When a magnet is pulled out the space changes colour creating a nice graphic effect. Even when not in use the bar can be a nice decorative element in your space. The magnet stripe bar is made in a white-red and a white-grey edition. The white-grey is more neutral and will fit best with a wide range of interiors.


The Minimalissimo team would like to wish you all happy holidays and a very Merry Christmas. We appreciate all of our new and longstanding readers and we hope to continue featuring beautiful minimalist designs every single day of the coming year. It’s going to be an interesting one, with many exciting announcements. All the best! — Adele, Bronwyn, Carl, Gian Marco, Jana, Jillian, Jorge, Marina, Mateus, Melle, Nhat & Niels-Peter. This year’s little festive feature is courtesy of Joyce Croonen and her handmade ombre Christmas ornaments. If you’re still feeling creative, here’s how to make them: 1. Buy white ornaments or get some old ones in any light colour you happen to have lying around somewhere. 2. Hang the ornaments outside on a piece of rope so you can easily paint them. 3. Spray paint the old ornaments completely white (if you’ve bought white ones, skip this step). 4. Once they are dry, spray paint your way up with black paint. 5. Take your time: spray paint at the bottom and try to get the ombre effect by slowly enlarging the distance between the ornaments and the paint.


Fran Corvi’s suitably names Corvi Wine Cooler takes cool to another level. Made from concrete, and moulded in a geometric form-mould, the result is one to match the most deserving of palettes. Each cooler can be stacked in an infinite array of designs to create a personalized wine cellar, and therefore pushes the boundaries of the expected formwork of the utilitarian object. Based on Argentina, Corvi’s inspiration is deriven from this background, where the wine cooler is a piece of me, my roots and my life where it also stands as a status symbol. His material choice seems to match said intent of stature. The geometric form of the Wine Cooler is said to comprise a series of sharp planes that offer a refined interpretation of the facets of a gem which also functionally double as the connecting platform element also. Photography courtesy of and available through Intoconcrete.


w151 is another wonderful lamp collection developed by the Swedish architecture and design trio Claesso Koivisto Rune. It was designed for Swedish company Wästberg, and will be presented during next year’s Stockholm Furniture and Light Fair. The collection is available in a range of powder-coated colour finishes and consists of a set of three enormous cone-shapes — well over a metre in width or height. CKR explains: Based on the most basic of geometrical shapes — the cone — all three are super-sized, pushing the limits of manufactured, spun aluminium, yet fitting through a normal doorframe. Paired with careful control of the fine details and the paper-like matt finishes, the lamp is almost illusory; dream-like — when experienced in reality.


Normann Copenhagen’s Bell Lamp is a luminous nod to industrial design. Available in four sizes and two color combinations, the lamp is both a sculpturally beautiful and functionally present piece. At the core of its design, is its simplicity. Made from aluminium and hanging from a 4m textile cord, the Bell Lamp is encompassing of the designer’s passion, to challenge the conventional design rules. Designers Andreas Lund and Jacob Rudbeck believe their designs should be based on passing on the Scandinavian design tradition and create everyday objects that have personality without being loud. A statement that speaks worlds. Based in Copenhagen, the duo are responsible for envisioning carefully articulated designs that add character and emphasize quality and stripped back minimalist thinking. The Bell Lamp is testament to that. Photography courtesy of Normann Copenhagen.


The KEEKO Watch is an everyday basic wristwatch with interchangeable bands designed by Elmar van Zyl in Melbourne, Australia. KEEKO aim to produce quality, timeless and minimal designs with a strong focus on traditional objects which have stood the test of time. We spoke to Elmar about the brand and his beautifully basic wirstwatch: Designed as the very essence of the watch; stock standard, brutally simple — void of all complication. I wanted to create a meaningful object which would never date, a timeless piece of design which could be passed down for generations. I think when we’re faced with instability and uncertainty we find comfort in the objects which form the core of our identity, a classic example being the wristwatch. The KEEKO Watch is available in three variants: brushed steel, black & white, and double black, along with six different coloured wristbands. The watch feels significant and solid, the body is precision machined stainless steel, topped off with a chamfered sapphire crystal lens. With such an impressive introductory design, I am excited to see how the KEEKO brand evolves. Outstanding work.