Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

Scales is a minimalist range of ceramic tiles that generate unexpected reflections. Neon colors are used along two rear sides of the smooth white glazed tiles. The individual tiles, arranged as fish scales, irradiate a colorful glow over the adjacent tiles. The 12x12cm square tiles, made in Spain, are available in eight different colors and one can create multiple compositions. We seek to imitate the feeling of vibrating movement transmitted by the sheeny skin of fishes when they ripple under water. Scales is a project between Alberto Sánchez, founder of Valencia based design studio Mut design, and Peronda, ceramic manufacturer for over half a century. What I particularly like about Scales is that you can make your tiled wall really stand out. You can easily create a colorful composition without it being too dominant in your space. Photography by Asier Rua and Designboom.


I met Studio Vit for the first time two years ago at Fuorisalone in Milan. I was affected by their radical minimalistic design, even through their business card and website. The studio, founded in 2010 by Helena Jonasson and Veronica Dagnert in London, design and create well made products, lighting and furniture with great attention to detail. After Globe and Marble Lights, Cone lights is a collection which is about opposites. It consists of two elementary forms, the cone and the sphere, that are combined in different ways. Spheres in handblown glass and cones in matt white or mirror polished metal make up lights that cast light from the ceiling, wall or floor. The materials are hollow or solid, matt or reflective. The pieces are sold as numbered editions from Etage Projects and each item is handmade in London. Light, materials and volume are key elements of Studio Vit production in relationship to the space. The objects should coexist harmoniously and at the same time create a tension in relation to each other. Cone Lights are not just simple lamps. They are beautifully geometric.


IKEA has recently launched Sinnerlig, a collaboration with London designer Ilse Crawford from Studioilse, on a range of cork and natural-fibre homeware products prominently featuring neutral colours that were chosen to fit into any home. In Crawford’s words: It’s supposed to work in a bathroom in Mumbai as well as a kitchen in Neasden, it has to fit into people’s lives. It is quite low key but we deliberately designed it like that, we see it as background, it’s not trying to compete with these fantastic icons of design — it’s a different thing. Set against the beautiful backdrop of Ett Hem hotel, also designed by Studioilse, the collection contains a range of around 30 products, from larger furniture pieces such as cork-covered tables and a daybed down to hand-blown glass bottles. The collection was unveiled during Stockholm Design Week and will be available in stores in August.


L & G Studio’s sculptural salt and pepper Cylinder Shakers are outstanding. Formally and functionally, they are a streamlined, sleek and glistening beacon to what they essentially stand to represent, the adding of a nuance to a situation; the culinary situation. Seattle-based Ladies & Gentlemen Studio is founded by Dylan Davis and Jean Lee and explores playful explorations in materiality where they blend their resourceful curiosity with the desire to find unexpected pairings. Available in Brass, Copper and Aluminum, these stealth pieces are 1.25” diameter and 3.25” tall. Since L & G Studio’s inception in 2010, their curated collection is one to watch. These pieces, being no exception. Their ever-evolving set of ideas and experiments collected from their everyday discoveries, explorations and surroundings should inspire and excite. Photography courtesy of L & G Studio.


Yield is an independent design house that crafts and manufactures a range of bags, jewellery, and household accessories. Established in 2012 by Rachel Gant and Andrew Deming, the Saint Augustine based designers create timeless pieces that blend beauty, sustainability and ethical production — a refreshing ‘no compromise’ approach. Now you may already be familiar with Yield’s work, having been previously featured highlighting their sculptural Geo Stand Set. Today however, this sublime ceramic French Press takes centre stage. The heavy walled ceramic press pot, available in cream and grey, is a functional and beautiful addition to your kitchen table. The matte ceramic body maintains a consistent temperature throughout the simple brewing process. It’s just about timing, measuring and of course, quality beans. One of its finest features for me is the stylish copper pull. Such an elegant touch to the design. Photography courtesy of Yield.


With a penchant for honest, aesthetic, clean and tactile design, Tokyo based designer Kazushige Miyake is no stranger to Minimalissimo, and towards the end of last year designed an air purifier for Japanese company Muji. Featuring a dual counter fan and 360°dust collection and deodorizing filter, this air purifier quickly removes matter suspended in the air. The outer casing of the product has a cylindrical shape in line with that of the filter. Air is drawn in from around the air purifier and clean air is emitted from the top of the device. Less junk in the air means more oxygen to breathe. The smart cylindrical design, not dissimilar to Apple’s Mac Pro, is sleek, simple and discreet, shying away from the typical bulky and unnatractive purifier appliances. Lovely work. Photography courtesy of Muji and Goichi Kondo.


Simon Legald’s Pocket for Normann Copenhagen adds a niche, literally, to any space. Made from Polypropylene, available in six colours, these pockets add an element of storage that goes beyond the traditional. Purposely designed to not add any unnecessary details, these are Scandinavian chic. There is an over emphasis on the function, with a streamlined and uncluttered aesthetic. Designed to be dishwasher safe, the mounting bracket is completely hidden once the Pocket organiser has been mounted. At Normann Copenhagen, they love to challenge the design rules and find traditional materials put into untraditional use. The Pocket is no exception; it is a celebration of these values. Photography courtesy of Normann Copenhagen.


It’s time to put music back into our daily lives, simply and beautifully. Audio accessories brand, Aether, have designed a music player that thinks. Cone is a wireless speaker with voice recognition technology that takes your requests and learns your tastes. It understands artists, albums and songs, so when you know exactly what you want to hear, just ask. Cone’s design carefully considers the human hand. Its dial is easy to turn in one palm, and when you change the song or genre you will feel it fall into place with a soft, magnetic snap. With eight hours of battery life, Cone is engineered to deliver impressively rich, detailed audio through a 3” woofer and 20-watt amplifier. As you may also expect, Cone supports AirPlay and Bluetooth connectivity. Beyond its impressive technical attributes, Cone has a wonderful aesthetic that features a smooth, minimalist design and is available in two colours: black & copper, and white & silver.


Swiss studio Mizko Design are the creators of this elegant and simple decorative home accessory — a maple wood bird called Woodput. Natural and clean, strong and unagitated, it is produced in small series by a local sheltered workshop in Aurau, Switzerland. The designers explain: The aim was to create a decorative object from a piece of wood with as few oscillated slices as possible. We wanted to experiment with how much you can reduce the shape so that the object is still identifiable as a bird. Woodput is meant to be an object, that tries to convince with its simplicity. Mizko Design was founded in 2012 by Sarah Hügin and Benedikt Löwenstein, two industrial designers, who’s collaborative efforts have seen them awarded a Red Dot Award in product design.


The Zorro by Stephanie Knust, brings new meaning to linear illumination. This piece is a beautiful composition of bent metal and the latest in illumination technology combined. The lines, or one line, of this piece are just exquisite. Seamlessly bringing together the function and form of the industrial piece, this would be a very welcome piece in any living space, adding to and creating a space. Stephanie Knust is based in Germany and her work is a collection of industrial design pieces, ranging from seating, lighting and other tabletop accessories. He work is both typically German and bolt of nature and this piece, the Zorro seems to fit within this portfolio and also show a growth in her design aesthetic in a direction of a more refined form work. Zorro is reliant on its environment to interact with. It isn’t a self-standing object, which in a way is a creative way of engaging the objects that light the space, with the actual space. I appreciate the creativity. Photography courtesy of Stephanie Knust.


California based Brad and Jenna Holdgrafer have always appreciated owning less. The idea of buying one high quality product over many average ones, lead to the couple creating Yes — an online store selling beautiful, thoughtful and well-designed lifestyle accessories. Furthermore, their store has a strong minimalist aesthetic, featuring many products I would personally love to have in my home. Whether that is the Drip Kettle by Hario, the Cast Iron Tea Candle Holder by Naft, or the Cork Boat by Materia. With a concise collection of everyday items, superbly selected, Yes have successfully created a shopping experience that encourages you to buy less, but when you have to buy, buy better. Not just minimal design, a minimal way of living. Check out the full range of products →


Poetic Lab’s Shadow Clock is an opposing composition of contractions. Subtle in size, when illuminated and in use, it transforms into a bold installation element. The Shadow Clock indicates the changing of time, through the use of light and reflection and refraction on the environmental issues to which it is installed; namely the wall. The pre-existing lighting therefore also plays a role in this expression of its function. London-based studio Poetic Lab, headed by Hanhsi Chen and Shikai Tseng, the collaboration has seen the joining of design philosophies, whereby the central spine of their design is that of poetry of objects and materials. Initially designed in 2012, this piece is 520mm high and 400mm in depth from the fixed surface, the Shadow Clock is made from Aluminium Alloy and stainless steel. Its interaction and dependency on its environment is particularly engaging. While the nod to the traditional sundial clock is obvious, this interpretation is very much welcomed. Photography courtesy of Poetic Lab.