Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

This minimalist lamp is a recent creation of the Japanese studio YOY, who’s work we previously featured. The piece, laconically titled Light, is a modern take on an old concept. It breathes new life into a familiar lampshade idea. Thanks to the cleverly shaped LED fixture, the lamp produces a lampshade-like projection on the wall. I love the humor of this lamp. The poll is shaped like a socket, creating an illusion of the invisible lightbulb. The piece comes in two forms, as a table and floor lamp. It has debuted at the 2014 Milano Salone.


Londen based design pratice DesignWright, founded by the brothers Jeremy & Adrian Wright, created a minimalist eye catching wrist watch named NUNO for Lexon. The NUNO wrist watch is a solid Quartz analog watch with a steel case and leather strap. The Wright brothers play with the expectations of a traditional watch; the traditional hands were replaced by two rotating discs. Two markers indicate the hours and minutes. The watch is completed with a simple steel case and leather strap. The NUNO wrist watch is suitable for both men and women. Currently there are four colour variants, all of which are equally attractive in their simplicity.


Most minimalist lighting projects shun wires, treat them like an eyesore that should be hidden from view. Paris based designer Arik Levi embraced the enemy and made it a focal point of his pendant light collection Wireflow for the Spanish brand Vibia. These lights consist of thin extra long metal rods with the LED fixtures on its ends. These long wires can create various two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes. I love how sculpturesque these lamps are. Who would have thought that a simple thread of metal and a light could create such powerful presence in a room. The Wireflow collection has won the Wallpaper Design Award 2014 as the Best Line Work.


Federico Floriani’s On The Rocks are a tribute to the traditional way of chilling drinks. Made from white marble, these beauties are founded on the principles of traditional thermal mass principles. On The Rocks are made from various geometric shaped pieces of stone that are intended to create a sense of landscape in your glass. In these, the beauty of the stone itself is the feature with its natural organic veined lines and hues of whites and greys. On The Rocks can be put in a freezer and later used in place of ice cubes to chill alcoholic bevaerages without diluting. These gems are an in valuable addition to any minimal entertaining ensemble and can be purchased through Fabrica. Hats off to Fenderico Floriani. Photography courtesy of Federico Floriani.


It is now our third feature of the work by Takuro Yamamoto Architects. However this time, it is not an architectural structure, but rather a complement to the living space. With an eye and a mind for minimal designs, the firm recently launched a series of lamps under the name of Minimal Green, consisting of Twig, Blossom, Bud and Flower. While the former two elegantly stand tall with their elongated thin bodies, Bud and Flower are more modest, acting as the younger siblings of this collection. It is in the details that one can differentiate the four from one another: on the trunk of these lamps, branches sprout out of the body to imitate the rustic feeling of plants, as the designer put. Not only do they act as an aesthetic communicator, but they can also be functional — used as a hanger for lightweight accessories and outerwear. I especially find Blossom the most provocative. Its straight body extends up to then flourish into a white mass, supported by a bent brach that plays with the eyes. The structure’s offset is what makes it interesting and intriguing, while its simplicity helps put it on the top of my wish-list.


Federico Floriani’s 123 Lamp is a kit of minimalist parts. The sinuous composition of these elements is just the gravy. Italian industrial and graphic designer Floriani has conceived this source of illumination through a want of pushing structure abstraction to explore new aesthetics and leave behind the classic bulb. The result sees a solid oak wood body that uses two metal legs as a stand. Intended as a focused desk light that is consciously designed with minimalist lines and a simplified form. The 123 Lamp encourages a sense of interaction and engagement with the user, as well as being beautifully executed. Photography courtesy of Federico Floriani.


Arkki lamp collection was designed by the Swedish product and interior designer Johan Kauppi, and was recently produced by BLOND Belysning. The name Arkki, Finnish for ark, derives from the fixtures ability to balance technique with soft shapes while somewhat resembling a craft or a capsule. The shapes are also an expression of a moderate tradition in the north. Each LED lamp is made with either a single or two joined shells of pressed felt. The family consists of ceiling fixtures and pendants, with a direct or indirect light distribution. Standard colours available are black, grey and white. I would consider the ceiling lamp a particularly strong design because of the perfect integration on the ceiling.


Atelier Peekaboo recently created a minimalist ceramic piggy bank named Sur les toits. The English translation is “on top of the roofs” and refers to the place where they found inspiration for the shape of the design. One easily inserts the money in the slot on top of the piggy bank and incase one needs the money, there is no need to crack the ceramic; just angle the piggy bank and shake gently. The prototypes, ranging in colours and sizes, have been handcrafted by the Fribourg based ceramist Peter Fink. Atelier Peekaboo was founded in 2008 by two Swiss designers from Neuchâtel. Damien Ummel and Thierry Didot met during their studies at the École Cantonale d’Art de Lausanne (ECAL). The two decided to strenght forces and by permanently questioning the industrial designer’s role in a society surrounded by objects, they try to provide elements to respond to it.


Clinq hanger by German-Latvian studio Flow Design is an idea so simple and logical, it is almost taunting. These magnetic hangers attach to any metal tube or surface without hooks. The user only needs to move the piece next to a metallic bar, and it snaps in place with a satisfying click. The magnets are strong enough for the hanger to support the weight of two kilos. Another neat thing about this design is that magnets naturally repel each other, creating even gaps between the hangers in the closet. And if you are not using some of the hangers, you can easily stack them on top of each other to save space. Clinq is handmade in the EU, using local resources, and comes in black, white and natural birch. Watch the video to see this hanger in action.


New Zealand based Boskke tries to improve conventional gardening tools and products for contemporary urban lifestyles. Boskke is derived from the old English word ‘bosky’ which means ‘a small forest’ and that’s exactly what you can create! Their latest creation is the Boskke Cube; a minimalist self-watering planter you need to water only once a month. The body is actually one big water reservoir and a slow watering system allows water to feed up into the soil, keeping your plant healthy and watered for extended periods. The transparent polycarbonate body reveals the soil and roots and allows you to witness firsthand the growth of your ‘boskke’. Boskke cube is available in 3 sizes – small, 3 small and large – you suit your needs for your urban garden.


The Check mirror has been designed by Florian Kallus and Sebastian Schneider of studio Kaschkasch Cologne for Danish brand Menu. Minimal in its form, the piece is also conscious of the space it occupies. Thanks to the triangle on top, the mirror can securely fit in any corner and take advantage of areas that are often left unused. And if the mirror is balanced against a flat surface, the triangle-shaped frame can be used as a rail for hanging clothes. Designers explain: Our products are casual and voguish at the same time. Precise lines and geometrical shapes give them a distinct impression, which we like to combine with intriguing colour combinations for the additional Kaschkasch touch. We want each design to offer something extra, discovered by the user little by little. The curved metal frame comes in black, white or moss green. Check has been displayed at the Stockholm Furniture Fair earlier this year.


South Korean artist Yoon Sol has produced a wonderful ceramic series titled From the Archetype, which involves layering porcelain in thin sheets to create different shapes. He writes: I work from a sphere to produce thin layers of bowl shaped elements with different diameters and heights. If these layers are placed one by one, small and big bowls can form an installation piece. From the Archetype tells a story of building up imperfection status through decomposition of a typical and perfect image, and of seeking the right pieces to complete my own pictorial puzzle. Here, Yoon Sol beautifully demonstrates the limitless of variation spawned from a single shape, resulting in a flawless collection of simple white ceramics that go beyond the aesthetics.