Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

Korefe’s concept and design for The Deli Garage: L’eaundry is subtly bold concurrently. The luxury brand introduced the new range of luxury detergents that resonate scents of high-end boutique perfume houses. The notion to treat your second skin like your first is the crux of the line. The graphic design and packaging is a nod to this. Korefe is a multidisciplinary design firm based in Hamburg, Germany. Their body of work and expertise extends to areas of advertising, books, corporate design, corporate publishing, interior design, brand innovation and assistance with product development. L’eaundry is a beautifully considered product whose brand is reinforced by the integrated, and obvious, design integration. Available in both Figue pour Femme and Olibanum pour home, all of a sudden the arduous task of laundry doesn’t seem, or smell, so bad. Photography courtesy of Korefe.


This small and minimalist timepiece by Korean studio Elevenplus encompasses 24 different timezones in its body. The trick is in the cylinder that allows you to view and switch between geographic locations in a single intuitive motion. Simply rotate the clock to put the desired timezone on top, and you will have the correct time. The designers explain: Let’s say someone living in New York wants to know the time in London. When it is 5:57 pm in New York, you can see that is is 10:57 pm in London if you roll the clock so that London appears on top. See the number on the clock to read the hour and the position of the minute hand to read the minutes. The hands of this world clock move independently from the rest of its body, so they quickly transition to any timezone. The piece comes in three colors: gray, blue and orange. Check out the video to see the clock in action.


HANK is an extremely simple product with a very sophisticated concept. Designed and developed by Berlin-based llot llov, Hank is an adjustable harness that holds glass mirrors with a v-shaped rope and a single drill hole, helping abandoned mirrors regain their rightful place on the wall. The kit consists of a wooden knob, waxed cotton rope and small aluminium plates, and comes in two sizes that cover every size and shape of mirror — as clever as it is light, says llot lov. The studio develops furniture, products, light and interiors and organize manufacturing and dispatch of their own label. Their design is both functional and emotional. According to their philosophy, they are often playful, always visionary, and work conceptually to aesthetically improve our day-to-day world. Photography by Ender Suenni.


Paolo Ulian is an awarded Italian designer who has an artistry background. With a collaborated blood, he recently produced a series of seven items made of unwanted materials with Moreno Ratti. As a part of the Marble Weeks 2014, the two have created a collection of furniture and housing utilities with scrapped marble tiles. There is a toy-like factor to these designs since they are put together from individual pieces cut by water jet. By giving the materials slots and notches, there is an instant recognization of assembly without any confusion. According to the standardization of the cuts, the final forms hold a mix of modern and minimal aesthetics. The series contains a lamp called Ratti, a layered tool, a table named SfridO, the O-ring bowl, the +O- Lamp, the Piet fruit bowl, and the Gerla vase. For some of the items, the trick of stacking creates volumes to these initially flat marble panels. Perhaps I was always intrigued with the patterns of the marbles that I decided to write about this collection. But perhaps not only so. The sustainable decision of the two designers to give these discarded pieces a second life is somewhat heroic. With that thought, these...


This asymmetrical pen by London based studio Beyond Object, employs the intuitive desire of a human mind to align and organize things. The piece is composed of three sections. When not in use, the middle section is dislocated from the rest of the the body. To use it, twist this middle part until it aligns with the lower section. Designers explain: Simplicity, quality, function and innovation have been the central tenets during the design process throughout this project. The mechanism we designed for this pen is completely unique, yet intuitive and reliable. We wanted to transcend the classical twisting or clicking mechanisms by developing this precise and user friendly piece of engineering. The pen comes in two sizes and three finishes. Check out the video to see this design in action.


Early last year, we introduced you to French audio accessories brand Aëdle and their superbly designed VK-1 headphones. Well, today we are excited to share with you the brand’s latest limited edition product in the form of the VK-1 Legacy headphones — an updated design of the VK-1 Classic edition. Although the design is not hugely different to its predecessor, the VK-1 Legacy features hand-sewn genuine lambskin leather in a black finish as well as a new cable with inline remote control and microphone, which enables the user with volume control, track selection, and play/pause functions. Aëdle explains: We worked closely with craftsmen to deliver an unprecedented level of quality in the materials we have chosen without compromising along with our signature sound. Made from a solid piece of aluminium machined on a 5-axis CNC, the acoustic chambers combine state-of-the-art manufacturing process to deliver this stunning shiny aspect. This machining combined with anodisation enables us to offer degree of finish never achieved before. Beautiful design. Beautiful minimalism.


Hang Around & Toss Around is a wonderful set of wooden cooking tools and salad servers created by the Copenhagen design studio KiBiSi for the Danish brand Muuto. The kitchen utensils are made in white beech wood and they have an extrusion cut in the back to hang on the edge of pots or pans. A really simple design with a fantastic and useful alteration to make them more practical to use. On the designs, KiBiSi explain: The kitchen utensils combine form, function and craftsmanship, but in KiBiSi’s interpretation, they are precisely designed and crafted for an essential contemporary look and functional ergonomics.


London based creative Josiah Jones created a compartmentalised tray in order to create the perfect formation for any given meal. The tray has 20 individual magnetised compartments that can be mixed and matched together. Jones initiated this project during his graduation year at Chelsea College of Art & Design. He wanted to investigate the idea that food fuels creativity; including what you eat, where you eat it and how you eat it. Creative professionals were invited for a social ‘work’ lunch and they could choose their ideal lunchtime meals. Lunch in exchange for their time, ideas and advice. Initiate relationships within the design industry. I really like the way you can play with the compartments and section off the different foods. The execution is also very impressive — geometric shaped nylon components and subtle integrated tiny magnets to connect the components with each other. I hope this tray will be taken into production, as I would be very interested in purchasing one.


This minimal wristwatch, aptly called Moreless, has been created by Denny Liao and Karen Han of Los Angeles based design studio, Mean. The watch face is clear of any visual clutter, the time increments are displayed on the inner side wall of the timepiece. As you tilt your hand, your reading of the time becomes more precise. You see less when you look straight at the watch, you see more at an angle. Here is how the designers describe their concept: The project explores a simple way for a watch to display time based on the user’s level of curiosity. There are many ways to communicate time on a watch, but how specific does the information need to be? The answer varies depending on the occasion. In most cases, you might just want to get a rough idea of the time of the day. Or rather, when an important meeting is coming up, you might want the information shown on the watch to be very specific. Thus, we asked ourselves: can some of the information on the watch be kept out of sight when not needed, and only appear as it becomes relevant to the user? The end result is an extremely minimal watch...


Frederico Traverso’s Pandora is a multiuse minimalist collection of lamps, tables and seating ornaments. Based on the philosophy of concealing the material composing them, each piece seems to have its own ethereal quality and lightness. Each piece is available in multiple sizes and when selected as the lighted version, each piece can be transformed into a feature lighting element. The illumination comes from LED technology and controlled through a remote device to ensure the sculptural piece itself is formally left uninterrupted. Available through Myyour, the collection is based on timeless design with hundreds of possible color combinations. Each element can be used internally or externally, maximizing its use and versatility also. There are 3 available sizes and each can be finished with either embossed detailing a smooth surface. Together in form and function, these pieces are beautiful and unobtrusive. And that is very beautiful. Photography courtesy of Frederico Traverso.


Norm Architects, which was founded by Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen and Kasper Rønn in 2008, is a multidisciplinary company that focuses on products that reflect the traditions and timelessness of Scandinavian designs — not only aesthetically, but also qualitatively. I was lucky enough to encounter the New Norm Dinnerware series that consists of jars, plates, bowls, and many other affordable minimal utilities. They all hold the colors and cleanliness that reflect the Nordic cultures. If one argues against the counter-complexity of the designs, one is missing the point. The craftsmanship being put into these pleasantly familiar pieces calls for a combination of materials — glass, wood, metal, stone, ceramic — that is not entirely alien to the users, yet still gives off an elegance of modernity. Launched back in 2011, this series still remains relevance in this contemporary design era, because Norm loyally stayed with their creative philosophy. In order to showcase these beautiful products, Norm collaborated with Cofoco in Copenhagen, resulting in Höst Restaurant. Like the New Norm Dinnerware themselves, Höst meshes the new and old Nordic traditions to inspire the upcoming generation, as well as call for an evaluation of time’s intervention in the design industry. Photos Courtesy of Norm...


The Japanese architect Shigeru Ban created an innovative, minimalist and elegant floor lamp for FontanaArte, named Yumi. In Japanese, Yumi means “bow” and that is exactly what this floor lamp looks like. Delicate, the stem is only 10mm thick, and strong. A clean design and simple shape that blends into a lightweight structure. The slim shape was made possible by the use of LED lights, integrated in the black composite and carbon fibre coated structure. The base is made of black lacquered metal. All wiring is hidden within. I love that. I think a lamp with such a minimalist appearance fits in any environment. Would it fit in your interior? It is said Shigeru Ban is not interested in the newest materials and techniques in designsbut he is definitely innovative and need the newest tools to make his ideas come alive. The fact Ban was the first architect in Japan to construct a building out of paper illustrates his innovative thinking.