Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial Design”

Minimalux, the UK based brand, wears its heart on its sleeves; the name itself leaves no room for doubting about the main influence for each project. Unsurprisingly, one of the most beloved minimal objects, the cube, is remixed to great effect to become the multi-color Neon. It’s worth noting that you may see a neon light visually, but there are none. It is nothing but an illusion. Here’s how the effect works: A folded steel box houses a common compact fluorescent lamp. No surprise there. The twist is where the light manages to surface, through the thin linear openings on each border of the cube. Thus, with a mix of clever angles and materials, emerges the Neon effect. This is very subdued lighting, far from being suitable as primary source for daily use. It is an extraordinary protagonist for lounge areas and as a supporting player for complex projects. Another surprising move is the color variance for Neon. Available in five colors: white, blue, green, yellow and pink. This is concrete proof that minimalism can retain its main qualities even when it goes beyond the reliable black and white. Neon-clad artist Dan Flavin would be proud.


Trava is a lightweight, three season, single pole tent by Boreas Gear that is unlike any other tent you have seen. Boreas’ designers were inspired by the bridges of the Spanish neo-futuristic architect Santiago Calatrava. The striated supports of Calatrava’s bridges work both as function and aesthetic. Like the bridges, the packs by Boreas Gear use a reinforced ribcage patterning and the design team’s aim was to combine both ideas in the structure of the tent. I really like the clean lines of Calatrava’s work and how the team of Boreas applied a similar style in the design of their first tent. The two person tent really stands out from others with its bright white colour. The completely white fly and the full grayscale canopy and pole system really go well together. The rain fly has a window and offers a clear view to the surrounding nature. A separate footprint that provides full ground cover can add an extra element of protection under the vestibule space. Boreas Gear is a small independent outdoor gear company based in San Fransisco. The small collaborative has clear vision for the future of outdoor equipment. They see an opportunity for better products, designed from the ground up,...


Xirel Segard’s Galalux Lamp is a floating sphere of concrete lux and a creative approach to illumination. Made from concrete and available in two varying sizes, the magical orb of light is both a sculptural and functional addition to space. The thin sliver of exposed light that seeps from the center of the sphere acts as the functional injection into an otherwise geometric form. Although it seems to levitate with this streak of light passing through it, the materiality itself helps ground the object to the space. Based in Paris, Segard has been involved in numerous exhibitions and the recipient of many awards. Weighing in around 3kgs, the Galalux is one of many of her experimentations with concrete. Her work is articulated form-wise with a somewhat lightness, somehow due to the aeration of the concrete itself, but there also exists this a duality and juxtaposition, through the material’s strength. This experimentation and playfulness has given birth to this beautiful piece of industrial design that subtly illuminates and just as subtly adds a sense of curiosity. Photography courtesy of Xirel Segard.


Janus is an extremely beautiful and smart family of candleholders developed by the multidisciplinary and award-winning designer Joe Doucet. Standard taper and tea light candle can be used interchangeably, just by rotating the holder. An elegant and simple solution thanks to its asymmetric shape. They are made from hand turned solid steel, the tallest one weighing nearly 10 lbs, to emphasise their durability and quality, designed to become a modern heirloom, passed down from generation to generation. The collection is available in solid steel plated and polished in copper, silver and black nickel, and measuring 2.5”ø x 5”, 2.5”ø x 3.5” and 2.5”ø x 2”.


ystudio look to revive the love of writing through their new line of beautiful, durable and minimalist writing tools. Crafted and manufactured out of Taiwan, the studio’s stationery collection is constructed from pure copper and brass and consists of a rollerball pen, ballpoint pen, sketching pen and mechanical pencil. We believe that the value of simplicity in design is very important. We design products to let people use in their daily life and let people feel the beauty of objects. We hope to express the attitude of people in Taiwan by ystudio stationary. Admittedly, I rarely find myself using pens or pencils these days unless I need to sketch something, but having used a ystudio pen, not only do I admire its aesthetic, there is something about the weight and feel that makes it a pleasure to use. Furthermore, the ageing effects of the material will gradually change the look and feel of each piece.


The Brick Lamp by HCWD Studio is a minimalist lamp that works very intuitively with a hand gesture. A warm toned light is activated when the lamp is raised and deactivated when laid flat. This clever switching mechanism is designed to work on all kinds of firm and horizontal surfaces. The side facets function as a natural handle and also direct the light when the lamp stands on its side. The lamps weight is engineered to make it stand stabilised. The objective is to capture the moment of light — being concealed and revealed. This unique lighting design would turn a quotidian routine into an enriching experience, providing an unexpected, fun quality to a daily object. The Brick Lamp is multi-functional and one can use the lamp wirelessly. A built-in battery allows the lamp to glow for up to five hours with a single charge. The housing of the Brick Lamp comes in three styles: concrete (light and dark), wood and metal (silver and black). My personal favorite is the metal (silver) edition with the matte finish on the facets and brush texture on the top surface.


DIY is an original and beautifully simple coat rack developed by the Austrian product designer Philipp Divitschek, based in Vienna. As its name indicates, the design is based on the idea of building a minimalistic coat rack by oneself, using materials that can be typically found at regular home improvements stores. The challenge for Philipp Divitschek was to achieve a modern product with a professional appearance. The DIY coat rack is made using just ordinary copper pipes, suitable copper fittings, limiting the unions to 90 degree angles, and simple plumber tools, forming a very interesting asymmetric and functional structure with just three supporting points on the floor. Photography by Martin Croce.


WayPoint’s Libra Lights are a beautiful symphony of converging illuminated lines. Designed by Sara Ferarri Design, and based in Italy, these lights combine for a sculptural feature and seamless lighting element. Each piece is not constrained by another, and as such, there is a fragility to their configuration; a feeling of movement. Each piece, if hung in a collaboration, hangs independently, therefore creating its own dialogue with the other pieces. Available in a brass, gold and polished silver finish, these Libra Lights are a handsome play on lines. Each module stays in balance thanks to weight forces hidden in their own shape and create interesting shapes in space. As part of the WayPoint Atelier collection, these lights result in sculptures of light in midair. Their minimal and lighted-ness add considerable value to any space. Photography courtesy of Federico Marin.


Minneapolis-based Louise Gray reinterprets the tradition of quilting through a discerning contemporary eye, seeking to enhance the living space for the modern, detail oriented, and socially conscious with their geometric, pastel-coloured quilts. The 100% cotton fabric quilts are carefully assembled and handcrafted in the U.S.A by local artisans and strive to be timeless pieces in both design and ethos. Louise Gray is the combined vision of sales director Alexandra Gray Bennett, who comes from a long family heritage of quilting, and Jocelin Johnson, a graphic designer experienced in art & creative direction. The brand revises the traditional quilting format, making it more relevant to a contemporary audience and offering their customers an opportunity to support the cut and sew industry of North America with each purchase.


The Knob Spice Grinder by Umbra Shift has a traditional look with a modern twist. The grinder consists of two parts: the grinder and a separate base. On top of the cylinder shaped grinder, one can see the grinders turning mechanism. This mechanism was inspired by an oven knob — an archetype for turning, the creators explain. The grinder includes an internal ceramic mechanism to finely grind spices. The separate base serves as a catch-all or pinch pot for freshly-ground spices. Ideal for cooking or presenting salt and pepper at the table. The grinder has a really nice aesthetic. The base and bowl are both made of beechwood and are available in natural, black and aqua finishes. My personal favorites are the natural and black finished grinders. The Knob Grinder is part of the inaugural collection of Umbra Shift, an extension of Umbra Studio focusing on contemporary collections, presented during the International Contemporary Furniture Fair last year. The mission of Umbra Shift is to rethink all manner of everyday items, in minimal design and for maximum effect.


Michael Anastassiades’ Mobile Chandelier 6 is a series of light-weight floating and balancing geometries. Each chandelier piece is comprised of black patinated brass, with mouth-blown opaline spheres for illumination and varying pendant rod lengths to order. The resulting forms are effortless and seem to engage in space with a unique lightness. Based in London, Anastassiades has collaborated and designed for FLOS, Lobmeyr and Svenskt Tenn, along with concentrating on the curation of his own signature pieces; a collection of lighting, furniture, jewellery, and tabletop objects. His philosophy of a continuous search for eclecticism, individuality, and timeless qualities in design is clear through his work, with an emphasis on the minimal and utilitarian. The Mobile Chandelier 6 series is a clear extension of this philosophy. Photography courtesy of Michael Anastassiades.


Shiro Studio is a London based design practice established by Andrea Morgante, committed to the creation of unique architecture and objects. Shiro means ‘white’ in Japanese, but here it implies a philosophical translation where white is perceived as the purest creative approach. An approach which has seen the design of the award winning Nivis — a strikingly sleek and minimalistic bathroom sink for Italian manufacturer Agape. Nivis pays homage to the most intimate and fragile sculptural qualities of snow, its unblemished whiteness and deep blanket fallen on everyday objects. Comprised of white cristalplant, Nivis’s surface becomes a soft, fluid mass where water can seamlessly flow, from the main to the secondary basin by rotating the overflow hole on the horizontal plane.