Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

Little Bishop is a clever, minimalist, ceiling hook specifically designed for cable hung pendant lights. Little Bishop, shaped and cast by hand, wears a lighting cable like a “cloak”. Smooth curved flowing channels in the hook guide the cable, locking itself down. The cable is a feature of the hook, eliminating the need of any knots or clamps. Little Bishop is available in three different post heights. Little Bishop is designed with eye for detail. The hook is unique in form and function. The hook is not a feature. Hanging seamless from the ceiling it just feels like it is part of the home. It is present but not overwhelming. The designer behind Little Bishop is Melbourne based Antony Richards from Hunter & Richards. Little Bishop was recently successfully funded on Kickstarter.


Poster is an interesting new project developed by the Japanese studio YOY. It is a series of minimalistic wall lamps that appear as a basic A2-sized poster — a great example of simple and smart design with few elements and an abundance of creativity. The shape of the lamp shade is created in the middle of a sheet of paper with several cuts, to fix to a wall with tape or pins like a poster. The lamp also features a small LED light that is hidden beneath the paper. The final result is quite incredible, whether on white or black, and the ability to print various colours and patterns can onto the surface is an added bonus.


Elise Rijnberg’s Piattona sees a seamless curated culinary assemblage brought to life. Originally designed as a prototype, this beautifully minimalist set is a response to the hurried thoughtless consumption of our frazzled times and seeks to get people to relax and take time to enjoy their food. The streamlined silverware set has a series of strong lines that simplify and force the user to engage in another way, to the act of using the items; and consequently to the act of eating itself. Based in Eindhoven in the Netherlands, Rijnberg is a freelance photographer, food stylist and designer. Her work is inspired out of her travels and engagement with culinary diversity. The name Piattona was originally introduced by Pellegrino referring to cutting the food without haste and chewing it slowly. This prototype collection challenges the user and changes the experience. Photography courtesy of Elise Rijnberg.


Dish 60 by Minimalux is a seductive and sophisticated gesture to the professional desktop. Amid the gadgets of interconnectedness, this piece sits as a sculptural nuance. Made with a stainless steel base and from solid brass, mirror polished by hand and electroplated in black nickel, this bowl is beautifully crafted. Also available in a plain, non-plated brass finish, this 60mm x 30mm piece is available through Leibal. The Liebal Store is a place of curated items focused on quality, minimalism and functionality. Dish 60 is no exception. Photography courtesy of Liebal Store.


Scales is a minimalist range of ceramic tiles that generate unexpected reflections. Neon colors are used along two rear sides of the smooth white glazed tiles. The individual tiles, arranged as fish scales, irradiate a colorful glow over the adjacent tiles. The 12x12cm square tiles, made in Spain, are available in eight different colors and one can create multiple compositions. We seek to imitate the feeling of vibrating movement transmitted by the sheeny skin of fishes when they ripple under water. Scales is a project between Alberto Sánchez, founder of Valencia based design studio Mut design, and Peronda, ceramic manufacturer for over half a century. What I particularly like about Scales is that you can make your tiled wall really stand out. You can easily create a colorful composition without it being too dominant in your space. Photography by Asier Rua and Designboom.


I met Studio Vit for the first time two years ago at Fuorisalone in Milan. I was affected by their radical minimalistic design, even through their business card and website. The studio, founded in 2010 by Helena Jonasson and Veronica Dagnert in London, design and create well made products, lighting and furniture with great attention to detail. After Globe and Marble Lights, Cone lights is a collection which is about opposites. It consists of two elementary forms, the cone and the sphere, that are combined in different ways. Spheres in handblown glass and cones in matt white or mirror polished metal make up lights that cast light from the ceiling, wall or floor. The materials are hollow or solid, matt or reflective. The pieces are sold as numbered editions from Etage Projects and each item is handmade in London. Light, materials and volume are key elements of Studio Vit production in relationship to the space. The objects should coexist harmoniously and at the same time create a tension in relation to each other. Cone Lights are not just simple lamps. They are beautifully geometric.


IKEA has recently launched Sinnerlig, a collaboration with London designer Ilse Crawford from Studioilse, on a range of cork and natural-fibre homeware products prominently featuring neutral colours that were chosen to fit into any home. In Crawford’s words: It’s supposed to work in a bathroom in Mumbai as well as a kitchen in Neasden, it has to fit into people’s lives. It is quite low key but we deliberately designed it like that, we see it as background, it’s not trying to compete with these fantastic icons of design — it’s a different thing. Set against the beautiful backdrop of Ett Hem hotel, also designed by Studioilse, the collection contains a range of around 30 products, from larger furniture pieces such as cork-covered tables and a daybed down to hand-blown glass bottles. The collection was unveiled during Stockholm Design Week and will be available in stores in August.


L & G Studio’s sculptural salt and pepper Cylinder Shakers are outstanding. Formally and functionally, they are a streamlined, sleek and glistening beacon to what they essentially stand to represent, the adding of a nuance to a situation; the culinary situation. Seattle-based Ladies & Gentlemen Studio is founded by Dylan Davis and Jean Lee and explores playful explorations in materiality where they blend their resourceful curiosity with the desire to find unexpected pairings. Available in Brass, Copper and Aluminum, these stealth pieces are 1.25” diameter and 3.25” tall. Since L & G Studio’s inception in 2010, their curated collection is one to watch. These pieces, being no exception. Their ever-evolving set of ideas and experiments collected from their everyday discoveries, explorations and surroundings should inspire and excite. Photography courtesy of L & G Studio.


Yield is an independent design house that crafts and manufactures a range of bags, jewellery, and household accessories. Established in 2012 by Rachel Gant and Andrew Deming, the Saint Augustine based designers create timeless pieces that blend beauty, sustainability and ethical production — a refreshing ‘no compromise’ approach. Now you may already be familiar with Yield’s work, having been previously featured highlighting their sculptural Geo Stand Set. Today however, this sublime ceramic French Press takes centre stage. The heavy walled ceramic press pot, available in cream and grey, is a functional and beautiful addition to your kitchen table. The matte ceramic body maintains a consistent temperature throughout the simple brewing process. It’s just about timing, measuring and of course, quality beans. One of its finest features for me is the stylish copper pull. Such an elegant touch to the design. Photography courtesy of Yield.


With a penchant for honest, aesthetic, clean and tactile design, Tokyo based designer Kazushige Miyake is no stranger to Minimalissimo, and towards the end of last year designed an air purifier for Japanese company Muji. Featuring a dual counter fan and 360°dust collection and deodorizing filter, this air purifier quickly removes matter suspended in the air. The outer casing of the product has a cylindrical shape in line with that of the filter. Air is drawn in from around the air purifier and clean air is emitted from the top of the device. Less junk in the air means more oxygen to breathe. The smart cylindrical design, not dissimilar to Apple’s Mac Pro, is sleek, simple and discreet, shying away from the typical bulky and unnatractive purifier appliances. Lovely work. Photography courtesy of Muji and Goichi Kondo.


Simon Legald’s Pocket for Normann Copenhagen adds a niche, literally, to any space. Made from Polypropylene, available in six colours, these pockets add an element of storage that goes beyond the traditional. Purposely designed to not add any unnecessary details, these are Scandinavian chic. There is an over emphasis on the function, with a streamlined and uncluttered aesthetic. Designed to be dishwasher safe, the mounting bracket is completely hidden once the Pocket organiser has been mounted. At Normann Copenhagen, they love to challenge the design rules and find traditional materials put into untraditional use. The Pocket is no exception; it is a celebration of these values. Photography courtesy of Normann Copenhagen.


It’s time to put music back into our daily lives, simply and beautifully. Audio accessories brand, Aether, have designed a music player that thinks. Cone is a wireless speaker with voice recognition technology that takes your requests and learns your tastes. It understands artists, albums and songs, so when you know exactly what you want to hear, just ask. Cone’s design carefully considers the human hand. Its dial is easy to turn in one palm, and when you change the song or genre you will feel it fall into place with a soft, magnetic snap. With eight hours of battery life, Cone is engineered to deliver impressively rich, detailed audio through a 3” woofer and 20-watt amplifier. As you may also expect, Cone supports AirPlay and Bluetooth connectivity. Beyond its impressive technical attributes, Cone has a wonderful aesthetic that features a smooth, minimalist design and is available in two colours: black & copper, and white & silver.