Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

The late Dutch industrial designer and sculptor, Aldo van den Nieuwelaar, characterised by geometric abstraction, a systematic approach and a minimal use of image resources — consistently represents simplicity and clarity of form in his work, reducing the design of all his products to their very essence. When I discovered the quite wonderful and minimalistic Cirkellamp by Aldo van den Nieuwelaar, I was surprised it hadn’t already been featured here on Minimalissimo. Originally designed in 1968 and consisting of a perfectly proportioned circle and square, Cirkellamp was produced in 2010 in honour of the great designer by Dutch lighting brand, Boops. The lamp has been updated with modern technology and makes use of a stepless dim button by a pulse dimmer. Beautiful, elegant and masterfully minimalist. Expect to see a few more Aldo van den Nieuwelaar designs celebrated in the future.


London-based designer and British bone china specialist Richard Brendon has been developing a number of studio collaborations with Patternity, a specialist organization dedicated solely to pattern, the latest being a bone china collection with the British traditional luxury homeware shop Fortnum & Mason. Resulting from Brendon’s dream of rejuvenating and repositioning the British bone china industry, the collection warps perceptions of what bone china can look like, featuring a precise, pure geometric pattern in Fortnum & Mason’s signature delicate color Eau de Nil, and are available for purchase. Born from a drive to use pattern as a tool to inspire, explore and innovate, Patternity comprises a pattern research/consultancy department, a pioneering events and education hub, and an award-winning creative studio, frequently developing collaborations with designers on a number of different fashion, interior, and product design projects.


Fou de Feu, founded by Veerle Van Overloop, is a ceramic studio based in Belgium that takes in the influences from architecture, photographic, and food culture. Inspired from water drops and their effects on a liquid surface, Rhythm was produced as a series of minimal tableware products. The fusion of white porcelain with leather, wood, and marble is rather an uncommon combination that works so well together, contrasting the pure white and the textured brown. With different functions, these products, ranging from something large like a cutting board to something small like a tea spoon, all share the same basic shape of a rounded square with an extended corner. The layering of materials is something quite clever that helps elevate the playfulness of these items. I found the synergy of these products, when put on top of one another to create the rippling effect, a very simple and effective method of display. Just like the name of the studio suggests, Rhythm not only has the right amount of minimalism, but it also intrigues those who are fun and whimsical.


These simple and well-thought-out glasses were created by young designer Félicie Eymard Ericsdóttir for Belgian glassware brand Durobor. Called Sopp, which means mushrooms in Norwegian, the glasses feature curvy shape. Designer claims that this shape makes them easier to handle. Sopp comes in three sizes, which are made from the same mold. Thanks to this unified base, the glasses can be stacked. The product is a 2014 Mad Surprize Young Belgian Design Product Design award winner. Photography by Julien Hayard


Danish furniture manufacturer Askman, successfully collaborate with some of Denmark’s best contemporary designers. Along with their 100 years experience in woodworking — which offers the base foundation for all their products — Askman have produced these wonderfully minimal furniture pieces; Square, designed by Jørgen Møller. Having been designing for Askman for more than 25 years, Jørgen Møller has created a remarkable collection of elegant, functional and minimalistic products. His Square series is a brilliant example of his work, which includes a magazine holder, box, and a nest of tables. It’s the quiet simplicity and the one primary shape (square) used throughout these pieces that has the minimalist in me appreciating everything about Møller’s designs.


Los Angeles based West of West created, in cooperation with Chris Noell, an experimental surfboard; Aero. A board built around the streamlined image of speed. The classic outlines of a planing hull blend with an asymmetrical split tail. The top is minimal while the bottom is extensively contoured. Ridges and valleys emerge from the bottoms surface, forming a new topography that reacts to speed and flow in unique ways. It is the contrast between top and bottom, connected by the striking split tail that I particularly like. Notable is the fin missing at the bottom and I wonder how that influences the directional stability. I imagine it can take a while to tame the board before you can head out and conquer impressive barrels. Aero was built for and displayed at the Architecture and Design Museum of Los Angeles.


Berlin-based Roomsafari has developed the ultimate in clothing accessories. Their Triangle Hanger is that said ultimate. Available in two finishes; silver aluminum and powder-coated black aluminum, this piece is simple, classic and designed to streamline storage. Inspired by the eponymous percussion instrument, this exceptionally minimal design features a hollow aluminum triangle, with an opening that replaces the hooks of conventional hangers. Designed by Christine Nogtev and Chul Cheong for Roomsafari, this piece is a beautiful and minimal statement of stripped-back functionality that also formally makes a bold statement. Available through Odetothings, this piece acts as the perfect silhouette. Photography courtesy of Odetothings.


Macedonian design duo Natali Ristovska and Miki Stefanoski recently collaborated to produce Stripe — a multifunctional box that allows for a wide variety of configurations and forms. A single modular element is the essence of this lightweight storage and shelving box making it incredibly simple for you to design your own compositions. The designers write: Stripe boxes connect together to create customisable cube furniture. You can get even more creative by giving the Stripe a new function. An individual element can be perfectly suited as a storage box, table, transport box or seating at the same time. Perfect for people who move a lot! Stripe can also be installed and reconfigured in just a minute, with any number of units, anywhere. From rows of stacked shelving blocks to a simple little side table, I could certainly make great use of a white collection of these beautiful boxes throughout my home. Photography by Ani & Dimi.


Chunk by Andreas Engesvik for Menu, is a simple and beautiful vessel for illumination. Designed specifically for Menu, this piece is available in both a marble and raw concrete finish. Both incredible. They are finished with either metal or copper insets to house the candle, and can be purchased in three differing sizes. Designed so that as the candle burns, the light reflects in the copper giving a beautiful glow; perfect for dinner tables and window sills; an industrial yet romantic look. Originating from Norway, Andreas Engesvik’s body of work has been highly acclaimed and diverse, but always consistent and minimal. This piece is no exception. Standing both 35mm, 55mm and 75mm high, all S,M,L have a diameter of 75mm. Available through Menu, Chunk are sure to become timeless classics. Photography courtesy of Menu.


Australia-based creative duo Daniel Emma created two little desktop organizers for indispensable items like paper clips and pushpins; Cork Cone & Magnetic Tower. The cone, 90 x 130mm, and tower, 65 x 100mm,are made of natural cork. For those who want more contract in material and colour; the tower available in ash as well. I love the simplicity of the desktop organizers with their geometric shapes and natural materials and appearance. Originally both organizers were produced as part of the D.E. desk, a range of self produced desktop accessories. Now they are Daniel Emma’s contribution to Sebastian Wrong’s on-going WRONG FOR HAY collection commissioned by Hay.


Fade is a collection of vessels and furniture for the bathroom, created by Stockholm based designers John Astbury and Kyuhyung Cho. It consists of 13 pieces: a low ash table, ash and copper mirror, and a collection of ceramic trays and vessels in parian clay. Designers explain: Beginning with a period of research on the subject of bathing we began to view it as both ritual and a metaphor for the work. To see ritual and water as both a transforming element and a moment of reflection. This is the foundation for the collection. The aim was the representation of the invisible, of transformation within the objects.  I like the geometry within the objects, the subtle contrast between relaxed and constricted shapes in each volume. Designers say, that the shifting tones of the collection represent the view on bathing as a ceremony and nature as a transformative element. Photography by Stephanie Wiegner


Spanish La Mamba Design Studio has re-visioned the conventional mirror. Their Mirrors collection, available through Omlette-ed, is a collection of understated beautiful lines and details manifested as a series of circular, vertical and horizontal standing mirrors. Comprised of a steel tubular frame, available in both black and white powder-coated metal finishes, these room adornments are the subtle dinner guest. The guests that everyone wants to know. La Mamba are based in Valencia, Spain and founded by designers Ommar Uribe, Pedro Rivera, and Raul Dura. Formally, these are unassuming, but the design and level of considered articulation of all elements is clear. These beauties stand at just over 1700mm high and are finished seamlessly with cork detailed legs. Nods to La Mamba. Photography courtesy of Omlette-ed.