Minimalissimo


Categorized “Floor lamp”

Nissa Kinjalina’s Living Light is an interesting play on form and function. Each piece is conceived on the idea of having poured the light into the frame. The resulting forms embody a still in time almost, and the illuminated elements act as floating forms in a curated fusion of geometric lines. Available in three varying sizes and slightly varied shapes, the series can be arranged in infinite ways spatially. The light that is created from these pieces provides a constant mass of illumination across the pieces as they provide light. The idea is that each piece can be easily transported in the spaces that they are placed, is also uniquely considered by the designer. The light element is encased in the lower part from different sides with a thin matte acrylic and this creates a housing for transport and reconfiguration. Combining innovation and pushing the ideas of what lighting can do and add to our spaces, Kinjalina is one to watch. Photography courtesy of Nissa Kinjalina.


Minimalux, the UK based brand, wears its heart on its sleeves; the name itself leaves no room for doubting about the main influence for each project. Unsurprisingly, one of the most beloved minimal objects, the cube, is remixed to great effect to become the multi-color Neon. It’s worth noting that you may see a neon light visually, but there are none. It is nothing but an illusion. Here’s how the effect works: A folded steel box houses a common compact fluorescent lamp. No surprise there. The twist is where the light manages to surface, through the thin linear openings on each border of the cube. Thus, with a mix of clever angles and materials, emerges the Neon effect. This is very subdued lighting, far from being suitable as primary source for daily use. It is an extraordinary protagonist for lounge areas and as a supporting player for complex projects. Another surprising move is the color variance for Neon. Available in five colors: white, blue, green, yellow and pink. This is concrete proof that minimalism can retain its main qualities even when it goes beyond the reliable black and white. Neon-clad artist Dan Flavin would be proud.


Xirel Segard’s Galalux Lamp is a floating sphere of concrete lux and a creative approach to illumination. Made from concrete and available in two varying sizes, the magical orb of light is both a sculptural and functional addition to space. The thin sliver of exposed light that seeps from the center of the sphere acts as the functional injection into an otherwise geometric form. Although it seems to levitate with this streak of light passing through it, the materiality itself helps ground the object to the space. Based in Paris, Segard has been involved in numerous exhibitions and the recipient of many awards. Weighing in around 3kgs, the Galalux is one of many of her experimentations with concrete. Her work is articulated form-wise with a somewhat lightness, somehow due to the aeration of the concrete itself, but there also exists this a duality and juxtaposition, through the material’s strength. This experimentation and playfulness has given birth to this beautiful piece of industrial design that subtly illuminates and just as subtly adds a sense of curiosity. Photography courtesy of Xirel Segard.


The Brick Lamp by HCWD Studio is a minimalist lamp that works very intuitively with a hand gesture. A warm toned light is activated when the lamp is raised and deactivated when laid flat. This clever switching mechanism is designed to work on all kinds of firm and horizontal surfaces. The side facets function as a natural handle and also direct the light when the lamp stands on its side. The lamps weight is engineered to make it stand stabilised. The objective is to capture the moment of light — being concealed and revealed. This unique lighting design would turn a quotidian routine into an enriching experience, providing an unexpected, fun quality to a daily object. The Brick Lamp is multi-functional and one can use the lamp wirelessly. A built-in battery allows the lamp to glow for up to five hours with a single charge. The housing of the Brick Lamp comes in three styles: concrete (light and dark), wood and metal (silver and black). My personal favorite is the metal (silver) edition with the matte finish on the facets and brush texture on the top surface.


The Zorro by Stephanie Knust, brings new meaning to linear illumination. This piece is a beautiful composition of bent metal and the latest in illumination technology combined. The lines, or one line, of this piece are just exquisite. Seamlessly bringing together the function and form of the industrial piece, this would be a very welcome piece in any living space, adding to and creating a space. Stephanie Knust is based in Germany and her work is a collection of industrial design pieces, ranging from seating, lighting and other tabletop accessories. He work is both typically German and bolt of nature and this piece, the Zorro seems to fit within this portfolio and also show a growth in her design aesthetic in a direction of a more refined form work. Zorro is reliant on its environment to interact with. It isn’t a self-standing object, which in a way is a creative way of engaging the objects that light the space, with the actual space. I appreciate the creativity. Photography courtesy of Stephanie Knust.


Stevan Djurovic’s Luna Lamp is a bold and beautiful statement in lighting. Standing, literally, as a beacon of illumination, it also has its own sculptural presence. This piece sees a minimal powder-coated matte finish metal frame, supporting an almost floating bulb-type piece. The bulb itself is also moveable, and its movement is the method by which the light is switched on (demonstrated here). There is an almost weightless quality to the lamp, creating the illusion of it floating. The resulting form is gallant but somehow subtle. Born in Kraljevo, Serbia, Djurovic’s has seen a number of creative collaborations, international design awards and publications. He is currently studying Interior Architecture at the Faculty of Philosophy and Arts in Kragujevac. The Luna Lamp is available through Monoqi.


Norway based designer and artist, Daniel Rybakken, has an outstanding portfolio of work that spreads installation, lighting and illumination creations. His latest — Compendium — a lamp family designed for Italian lighting company, Luceplan. Rybakken asked the question: How would you best illuminate a room with only one light source? To begin with, you would need a very strong light source, and secondly you would like to have it to come from the side, in the same manner as a window with natural light coming into the space. Thirdly, since you have this strong light source, you need to avoid glare, so you should try to diffuse and soften the light. These three aspects were the primary focus of the Compendium project. The lamp, made from extruded anodised aluminium, features a very strong LED light source directed towards the wall, and by doing this, a soft light reflects into the open space, creating a beautifully balanced illumination. The compendium family consists of a floor version with a freely rotatable stem and a suspended version, mountable either as an up or downward light. Photography by Kalle Sanner & Daniel Rybakken.


The Tumble Lamp or Tuimelled is another remarkable table and floor lamp design by renowned Dutch industrial designer Aldo van den Nieuwelaar. Originally designed in 1968 and re-produced by Dutch lighting brand Boops, in his honour, the tumble lamp is comprised of powder coated aluminium, an LED warm white lamp, featuring dimmer control, and is available in black and white. On his design work, Aldo van den Nieuwelaar wrote: My challenge is the experimentation with geometrical forms, which can be traced back to the work of modern visual artists such as Donald Judd and Jan Schoonhoven. It is precisely this successful experimentation with geometry that makes Aldo’s work so wonderfully appealing to those of us who appreciate minimalism, leaving an everlasting legacy of geometric abstraction and simplicity in design.


Viabizzuno founded in 1994 this year celebrates 20 years of life. Via Bizzuno is the name of the main road of the small village Bizzuno located in the province of Ravenna, Italy, where Mario Nanni — the founder — was born. In 2014 Viabizzuno continues the series Roy (Parete, Tavolo, Terra) — born two years ago — with Parete, a floor light fitting for indoor use in steel and aluminium painted nero royal or made in copper bronze brass. Roy Parete is made up of a head containing the light source, assembled on a metal arm with 8mm diameter that can rotate around the longitudinal axis by 180°, inserted on bracket size 120x60x20mm that is, in turn, fitted to a 240x120x10mm size steel plate. The head is wired with 6W 3000K diffused led light or with 3W 3000K led for the spot light, adjustable on two axes with a special brass hinge and a thin rod that allows easy and precise adjustment. The bracket fitted to the base houses a touch control switch to turn the light fitting on and off.


The late Dutch industrial designer and sculptor, Aldo van den Nieuwelaar, characterised by geometric abstraction, a systematic approach and a minimal use of image resources — consistently represents simplicity and clarity of form in his work, reducing the design of all his products to their very essence. When I discovered the quite wonderful and minimalistic Cirkellamp by Aldo van den Nieuwelaar, I was surprised it hadn’t already been featured here on Minimalissimo. Originally designed in 1968 and consisting of a perfectly proportioned circle and square, Cirkellamp was produced in 2010 in honour of the great designer by Dutch lighting brand, Boops. The lamp has been updated with modern technology and makes use of a stepless dim button by a pulse dimmer. Beautiful, elegant and masterfully minimalist. Expect to see a few more Aldo van den Nieuwelaar designs celebrated in the future.


The Japanese architect Shigeru Ban created an innovative, minimalist and elegant floor lamp for FontanaArte, named Yumi. In Japanese, Yumi means “bow” and that is exactly what this floor lamp looks like. Delicate, the stem is only 10mm thick, and strong. A clean design and simple shape that blends into a lightweight structure. The slim shape was made possible by the use of LED lights, integrated in the black composite and carbon fibre coated structure. The base is made of black lacquered metal. All wiring is hidden within. I love that. I think a lamp with such a minimalist appearance fits in any environment. Would it fit in your interior? It is said Shigeru Ban is not interested in the newest materials and techniques in designsbut he is definitely innovative and need the newest tools to make his ideas come alive. The fact Ban was the first architect in Japan to construct a building out of paper illustrates his innovative thinking.


Barcelona based designer Adolfo Abejon created this simple and witty lamp, aptly called Slim. Constructed from an iron pipe, the piece resembles the shape of the traditional post-and-shade lamp. The familiar form is stripped down to its mere outline, making Slim a minimalist version of the timeless classic. Abejon explains: The lamps play a joke on themselves. This collection reminds the archetype of lamps composed of a lampshade, a central body and the base. The design keeps this idea by breaking the parts and keeping the important things: a pipe is enough to hold the bulb and the lampshade is used just to protect the bulb in case of falling down. The lamp comes in floor and table versions and in three colors: black, white and turquoise.