Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

Danish furniture manufacturer Askman, successfully collaborate with some of Denmark’s best contemporary designers. Along with their 100 years experience in woodworking — which offers the base foundation for all their products — Askman have produced these wonderfully minimal furniture pieces; Square, designed by Jørgen Møller. Having been designing for Askman for more than 25 years, Jørgen Møller has created a remarkable collection of elegant, functional and minimalistic products. His Square series is a brilliant example of his work, which includes a magazine holder, box, and a nest of tables. It’s the quiet simplicity and the one primary shape (square) used throughout these pieces that has the minimalist in me appreciating everything about Møller’s designs.


Los Angeles based West of West created, in cooperation with Chris Noell, an experimental surfboard; Aero. A board built around the streamlined image of speed. The classic outlines of a planing hull blend with an asymmetrical split tail. The top is minimal while the bottom is extensively contoured. Ridges and valleys emerge from the bottoms surface, forming a new topography that reacts to speed and flow in unique ways. It is the contrast between top and bottom, connected by the striking split tail that I particularly like. Notable is the fin missing at the bottom and I wonder how that influences the directional stability. I imagine it can take a while to tame the board before you can head out and conquer impressive barrels. Aero was built for and displayed at the Architecture and Design Museum of Los Angeles.


Berlin-based Roomsafari has developed the ultimate in clothing accessories. Their Triangle Hanger is that said ultimate. Available in two finishes; silver aluminum and powder-coated black aluminum, this piece is simple, classic and designed to streamline storage. Inspired by the eponymous percussion instrument, this exceptionally minimal design features a hollow aluminum triangle, with an opening that replaces the hooks of conventional hangers. Designed by Christine Nogtev and Chul Cheong for Roomsafari, this piece is a beautiful and minimal statement of stripped-back functionality that also formally makes a bold statement. Available through Odetothings, this piece acts as the perfect silhouette. Photography courtesy of Odetothings.


Macedonian design duo Natali Ristovska and Miki Stefanoski recently collaborated to produce Stripe — a multifunctional box that allows for a wide variety of configurations and forms. A single modular element is the essence of this lightweight storage and shelving box making it incredibly simple for you to design your own compositions. The designers write: Stripe boxes connect together to create customisable cube furniture. You can get even more creative by giving the Stripe a new function. An individual element can be perfectly suited as a storage box, table, transport box or seating at the same time. Perfect for people who move a lot! Stripe can also be installed and reconfigured in just a minute, with any number of units, anywhere. From rows of stacked shelving blocks to a simple little side table, I could certainly make great use of a white collection of these beautiful boxes throughout my home. Photography by Ani & Dimi.


Chunk by Andreas Engesvik for Menu, is a simple and beautiful vessel for illumination. Designed specifically for Menu, this piece is available in both a marble and raw concrete finish. Both incredible. They are finished with either metal or copper insets to house the candle, and can be purchased in three differing sizes. Designed so that as the candle burns, the light reflects in the copper giving a beautiful glow; perfect for dinner tables and window sills; an industrial yet romantic look. Originating from Norway, Andreas Engesvik’s body of work has been highly acclaimed and diverse, but always consistent and minimal. This piece is no exception. Standing both 35mm, 55mm and 75mm high, all S,M,L have a diameter of 75mm. Available through Menu, Chunk are sure to become timeless classics. Photography courtesy of Menu.


Australia-based creative duo Daniel Emma created two little desktop organizers for indispensable items like paper clips and pushpins; Cork Cone & Magnetic Tower. The cone, 90 x 130mm, and tower, 65 x 100mm,are made of natural cork. For those who want more contract in material and colour; the tower available in ash as well. I love the simplicity of the desktop organizers with their geometric shapes and natural materials and appearance. Originally both organizers were produced as part of the D.E. desk, a range of self produced desktop accessories. Now they are Daniel Emma’s contribution to Sebastian Wrong’s on-going WRONG FOR HAY collection commissioned by Hay.


Fade is a collection of vessels and furniture for the bathroom, created by Stockholm based designers John Astbury and Kyuhyung Cho. It consists of 13 pieces: a low ash table, ash and copper mirror, and a collection of ceramic trays and vessels in parian clay. Designers explain: Beginning with a period of research on the subject of bathing we began to view it as both ritual and a metaphor for the work. To see ritual and water as both a transforming element and a moment of reflection. This is the foundation for the collection. The aim was the representation of the invisible, of transformation within the objects.  I like the geometry within the objects, the subtle contrast between relaxed and constricted shapes in each volume. Designers say, that the shifting tones of the collection represent the view on bathing as a ceremony and nature as a transformative element. Photography by Stephanie Wiegner


Spanish La Mamba Design Studio has re-visioned the conventional mirror. Their Mirrors collection, available through Omlette-ed, is a collection of understated beautiful lines and details manifested as a series of circular, vertical and horizontal standing mirrors. Comprised of a steel tubular frame, available in both black and white powder-coated metal finishes, these room adornments are the subtle dinner guest. The guests that everyone wants to know. La Mamba are based in Valencia, Spain and founded by designers Ommar Uribe, Pedro Rivera, and Raul Dura. Formally, these are unassuming, but the design and level of considered articulation of all elements is clear. These beauties stand at just over 1700mm high and are finished seamlessly with cork detailed legs. Nods to La Mamba. Photography courtesy of Omlette-ed.


Korefe’s concept and design for The Deli Garage: L’eaundry is subtly bold concurrently. The luxury brand introduced the new range of luxury detergents that resonate scents of high-end boutique perfume houses. The notion to treat your second skin like your first is the crux of the line. The graphic design and packaging is a nod to this. Korefe is a multidisciplinary design firm based in Hamburg, Germany. Their body of work and expertise extends to areas of advertising, books, corporate design, corporate publishing, interior design, brand innovation and assistance with product development. L’eaundry is a beautifully considered product whose brand is reinforced by the integrated, and obvious, design integration. Available in both Figue pour Femme and Olibanum pour home, all of a sudden the arduous task of laundry doesn’t seem, or smell, so bad. Photography courtesy of Korefe.


This small and minimalist timepiece by Korean studio Elevenplus encompasses 24 different timezones in its body. The trick is in the cylinder that allows you to view and switch between geographic locations in a single intuitive motion. Simply rotate the clock to put the desired timezone on top, and you will have the correct time. The designers explain: Let’s say someone living in New York wants to know the time in London. When it is 5:57 pm in New York, you can see that is is 10:57 pm in London if you roll the clock so that London appears on top. See the number on the clock to read the hour and the position of the minute hand to read the minutes. The hands of this world clock move independently from the rest of its body, so they quickly transition to any timezone. The piece comes in three colors: gray, blue and orange. Check out the video to see the clock in action.


HANK is an extremely simple product with a very sophisticated concept. Designed and developed by Berlin-based llot llov, Hank is an adjustable harness that holds glass mirrors with a v-shaped rope and a single drill hole, helping abandoned mirrors regain their rightful place on the wall. The kit consists of a wooden knob, waxed cotton rope and small aluminium plates, and comes in two sizes that cover every size and shape of mirror — as clever as it is light, says llot lov. The studio develops furniture, products, light and interiors and organize manufacturing and dispatch of their own label. Their design is both functional and emotional. According to their philosophy, they are often playful, always visionary, and work conceptually to aesthetically improve our day-to-day world. Photography by Ender Suenni.


Paolo Ulian is an awarded Italian designer who has an artistry background. With a collaborated blood, he recently produced a series of seven items made of unwanted materials with Moreno Ratti. As a part of the Marble Weeks 2014, the two have created a collection of furniture and housing utilities with scrapped marble tiles. There is a toy-like factor to these designs since they are put together from individual pieces cut by water jet. By giving the materials slots and notches, there is an instant recognization of assembly without any confusion. According to the standardization of the cuts, the final forms hold a mix of modern and minimal aesthetics. The series contains a lamp called Ratti, a layered tool, a table named SfridO, the O-ring bowl, the +O- Lamp, the Piet fruit bowl, and the Gerla vase. For some of the items, the trick of stacking creates volumes to these initially flat marble panels. Perhaps I was always intrigued with the patterns of the marbles that I decided to write about this collection. But perhaps not only so. The sustainable decision of the two designers to give these discarded pieces a second life is somewhat heroic. With that thought, these...