Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

This minimalist Piggy Bank is created by Selma Durand during her Master thesis of Industrial Design in ENSCI-Les Ateliers, Paris. Durand wanted to focus on the everyday situation where people collect pocket change without being aware of its value. In fact they usually put it in a pin tray where it stays untouched. Especially the cent coins are undervalued and one can use Piggy Bank to collect those. Piggy Bank, made of a ceramic outer container and a brass inner container, uses a clever hidden mechanism to weigh the pocket change as coins are stacking. Both containers level when the value of the coins is approximately 1 euro. I chose to focus on 1 euro because it is a standard unit which also corresponds to the price of a baguette, a coffee or a stamp. Being one stashing my pocket change in an old box, where it stays untouched, I really like the thought behind this minimalist piggy bank. Love the combination of materials too.


Rene Schwolow’s Units of Time assembles as a triage of time telling line work. Made of powder-coated aluminum, the series of time telling devices are intended as a series of wall clocks with continuous sweeping elements. German-based designer, Schwolow is playing with time and its ephemeral nature through form. She plays with the idea of time being a notion that exists through the physical manifestation of its present through the clock. Units of Time discusses the subject of experience and perishability of time, as well as its apparent non-existence. Each piece of the series shows one element of time; hour, minute and second. Schwowlow is pushing the boundaries of our conceived notions through the simplification of something that truly has the power to control our actions. Through this simplification and stripped back motion, perhaps she is also asking us to see the beauty in time also; piece by piece. Photography courtesy of Rene Schwolow.


Issey Miyake is notable for its challenging take on the general concept of fashion. Along with the clever mind of artistic designer Tokujin Yoshioka, the collaboration between two creative visions have produced the TO watch collection that is both minimal in design and unique in material usage. TO, having four versions varied from SILAN001 to SILAN004, the fusion of the metal dial and the leather strap gives a certain boldness and masculinity to the user. With three circular layers, two for each hand, and one for the time marks, which bleed to the edge of the dial, there is something monumental about this small-scale piece of accessory. SILAN003 is the one that stands out the most to me, due to the contrast between the silver and the black, as well as the textures of the two materials. The correspondent silver buckle also helps heighten the elegance of this particular watch. Not only the watch is cautiously designed, its packaging is also carefully articulated with the use of metal spin-brushing. Nesting inside the black foam and the simple instruction is the product itself, waiting to embrace the wrist of the modern man. Photo Courtesy of Andrew Kim


Adelaide-based collaborative duo Daniel Emma have partnered with Field to bring Magnifier onto the stage. Essentially it is a magnifier, beautifully crafted from brass with a brushed seamless finish. This piece also acts as a handsome paperweight and serious desk accompaniment. Daniel Emma is comprised of Daniel To and Emma Aiston who established their practice in 2008 after graduating in 2007. They studied concurrently in the industrial design discipline in Adelaide. Their work has been shown in Paris, Tokyo, New York, and Berlin and throughout Australia after first showing in London in 2008, early on. Their list of current exhibitions is endless and recognition within the design field also through their design work and installations is commendable. Available through Field, Magnifier is an extension of the duo’s ethos to create the unexpected from simple objects using simple forms. Photography courtesy of Leonhard Hilzensauer.


In collaboration with AUDI Design, Leica introduces the Leica T — a new mirror-less compact camera system that features a beautifully minimalistic design, and engineered out of a single block of aluminium. The Leica T features a large APS-C sensor with 16.5 megapixels, ensuring colour fidelity, the finest details and pictures with exceptional brightness and clarity. A 3.7” touchscreen display handles the majority of functions with a simple, intuitive design, and with an integrated wi-fi module, sharing your photos has been made incredibly easy. The craftsmanship that goes into making Leica T is remarkable. Watch the video to see for yourself → Focused on what is essential — the sheer joy of photography. Simple and brilliant with a stunning aesthetic.


Aura mirror series is a beautiful project by the Norwegian designer Bjørn van den Berg, where the hemispherical shaped mirrors are converted into a whole reflecting object, not just a surface. The project is about tactility and sensibility. Aura’s format relates to fit into two open hands. When the object is exposed to light, the light is reflected differently from the flat mirror surface and the circular body; making you aware of your surroundings and the changes in light. The series consists of a wall and table mirror and they have been developed using solid aluminium, electroplated with copper, chrome or nickel, producing a wonderful finish.


To inspire their audience with new ideas and materials, Menu collaborated with some of the worlds most talented designers. The Gridy Me mirror was designed by the Oslo based design studio Gridy by Lars Olav Dybdal and Wilhelm Grieg Teisner. Two parts. Easily assembled. One can position the mirror in portrait or landscape mode and then choose between a ‘normal’ mirror reflection glass or the opposite side in nostalgic, warm, copper tone. Whatever you decide, the lines of the smoked colour oak base will draw a unique landscape on each mirror. The dimensions make the Gridy Me mirror for a vanity mirror or as a decorative element in your bathroom or living area. The Norwegian designers, Dybdal and Grieg Teisner met during their study and together they aim to create streamlined design with a strong sense of personality and function. “Gridy” is a combination of their surnames.


This minimalist lamp is a recent creation of the Japanese studio YOY, who’s work we previously featured. The piece, laconically titled Light, is a modern take on an old concept. It breathes new life into a familiar lampshade idea. Thanks to the cleverly shaped LED fixture, the lamp produces a lampshade-like projection on the wall. I love the humor of this lamp. The poll is shaped like a socket, creating an illusion of the invisible lightbulb. The piece comes in two forms, as a table and floor lamp. It has debuted at the 2014 Milano Salone.


Londen based design pratice DesignWright, founded by the brothers Jeremy & Adrian Wright, created a minimalist eye catching wrist watch named NUNO for Lexon. The NUNO wrist watch is a solid Quartz analog watch with a steel case and leather strap. The Wright brothers play with the expectations of a traditional watch; the traditional hands were replaced by two rotating discs. Two markers indicate the hours and minutes. The watch is completed with a simple steel case and leather strap. The NUNO wrist watch is suitable for both men and women. Currently there are four colour variants, all of which are equally attractive in their simplicity.


Most minimalist lighting projects shun wires, treat them like an eyesore that should be hidden from view. Paris based designer Arik Levi embraced the enemy and made it a focal point of his pendant light collection Wireflow for the Spanish brand Vibia. These lights consist of thin extra long metal rods with the LED fixtures on its ends. These long wires can create various two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes. I love how sculpturesque these lamps are. Who would have thought that a simple thread of metal and a light could create such powerful presence in a room. The Wireflow collection has won the Wallpaper Design Award 2014 as the Best Line Work.


Federico Floriani’s On The Rocks are a tribute to the traditional way of chilling drinks. Made from white marble, these beauties are founded on the principles of traditional thermal mass principles. On The Rocks are made from various geometric shaped pieces of stone that are intended to create a sense of landscape in your glass. In these, the beauty of the stone itself is the feature with its natural organic veined lines and hues of whites and greys. On The Rocks can be put in a freezer and later used in place of ice cubes to chill alcoholic bevaerages without diluting. These gems are an in valuable addition to any minimal entertaining ensemble and can be purchased through Fabrica. Hats off to Fenderico Floriani. Photography courtesy of Federico Floriani.


It is now our third feature of the work by Takuro Yamamoto Architects. However this time, it is not an architectural structure, but rather a complement to the living space. With an eye and a mind for minimal designs, the firm recently launched a series of lamps under the name of Minimal Green, consisting of Twig, Blossom, Bud and Flower. While the former two elegantly stand tall with their elongated thin bodies, Bud and Flower are more modest, acting as the younger siblings of this collection. It is in the details that one can differentiate the four from one another: on the trunk of these lamps, branches sprout out of the body to imitate the rustic feeling of plants, as the designer put. Not only do they act as an aesthetic communicator, but they can also be functional — used as a hanger for lightweight accessories and outerwear. I especially find Blossom the most provocative. Its straight body extends up to then flourish into a white mass, supported by a bent brach that plays with the eyes. The structure’s offset is what makes it interesting and intriguing, while its simplicity helps put it on the top of my wish-list.