Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

Frederico Traverso’s Pandora is a multiuse minimalist collection of lamps, tables and seating ornaments. Based on the philosophy of concealing the material composing them, each piece seems to have its own ethereal quality and lightness. Each piece is available in multiple sizes and when selected as the lighted version, each piece can be transformed into a feature lighting element. The illumination comes from LED technology and controlled through a remote device to ensure the sculptural piece itself is formally left uninterrupted. Available through Myyour, the collection is based on timeless design with hundreds of possible color combinations. Each element can be used internally or externally, maximizing its use and versatility also. There are 3 available sizes and each can be finished with either embossed detailing a smooth surface. Together in form and function, these pieces are beautiful and unobtrusive. And that is very beautiful. Photography courtesy of Frederico Traverso.


Norm Architects, which was founded by Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen and Kasper Rønn in 2008, is a multidisciplinary company that focuses on products that reflect the traditions and timelessness of Scandinavian designs — not only aesthetically, but also qualitatively. I was lucky enough to encounter the New Norm Dinnerware series that consists of jars, plates, bowls, and many other affordable minimal utilities. They all hold the colors and cleanliness that reflect the Nordic cultures. If one argues against the counter-complexity of the designs, one is missing the point. The craftsmanship being put into these pleasantly familiar pieces calls for a combination of materials — glass, wood, metal, stone, ceramic — that is not entirely alien to the users, yet still gives off an elegance of modernity. Launched back in 2011, this series still remains relevance in this contemporary design era, because Norm loyally stayed with their creative philosophy. In order to showcase these beautiful products, Norm collaborated with Cofoco in Copenhagen, resulting in Höst Restaurant. Like the New Norm Dinnerware themselves, Höst meshes the new and old Nordic traditions to inspire the upcoming generation, as well as call for an evaluation of time’s intervention in the design industry. Photos Courtesy of Norm...


The Japanese architect Shigeru Ban created an innovative, minimalist and elegant floor lamp for FontanaArte, named Yumi. In Japanese, Yumi means “bow” and that is exactly what this floor lamp looks like. Delicate, the stem is only 10mm thick, and strong. A clean design and simple shape that blends into a lightweight structure. The slim shape was made possible by the use of LED lights, integrated in the black composite and carbon fibre coated structure. The base is made of black lacquered metal. All wiring is hidden within. I love that. I think a lamp with such a minimalist appearance fits in any environment. Would it fit in your interior? It is said Shigeru Ban is not interested in the newest materials and techniques in designsbut he is definitely innovative and need the newest tools to make his ideas come alive. The fact Ban was the first architect in Japan to construct a building out of paper illustrates his innovative thinking.


The Stickbulb collection from RUX brings the ability to customize lamps to the masses. And customize in a seriously slick way. Co-founded in 2012 by Russell Greenberg and Christopher Beardsley, RUX is a fusion of minimal lines, inter-connective elements and where the design of the object is in the hands of the end user. I think this is ingenious. The resulting aesthetic is also nothing short of beautiful. The collection is a combination of pendants, wall scones, table lamps and floor lamps. The primary design philosophy of the range is that it is a pure and minimal expression. I couldn’t agree more. The construction of each lighting option is a sleek wooden beam, available in varying lengths. Interchangeable connector pieces allows for multiple sticks to be placed together, to create a feature, or to attach to walls, and to illuminate any space. The wood used is reclaimed and sustainably sourced and is coupled with efficient LED technology. The collection was designed with the least number of parts possible with connections that make the pieces easy to separate for maintenance, recycling, or reuse. These are seriously note-worthy. Available from Rux. Photography courtesy of Rux.


Bottle Watch is a wonderfully minimalist, analogue wristwatch with raised nodules around its glass perimeter, similar to those found on the bottom of a glass beverage bottle. The watch was designed by London based studio Industrial Facility for Italian accessories company, Nava. The designers explain: We noticed that there are often exactly sixty of these nodules found on a typical beer bottle where the function is to avoid suction between the bottle and a table surface. This observation makes a useful correlation to the units of timekeeping and replicating these nodules creates a strikingly iridescent appearance when light hits its face at different angles. Bottle Watch is available in brown ale, green wine, clear spirit and blue water — colours that follow typical glass bottles. Although these colours don’t overly appeal to me, I do think this is a super concept.


St. Petersburg based designer Lesha Galkin created this clever minimalist desk organizer, called Shkatulka (Russian for ‘keepsake box’). The piece unfolds to reveal the series of modular components, allowing you to hold your pencils, papers, paper clips, notepads and other desk essentials. Here is how Galkin reflects on this project: Caskets with a ‘secret’, special opening mechanism, were very popular in Russia from ancient times and were used for keeping valuables and important items. Storage kit Shkatulka has a secret too, as well as valuable contents. It is a set of various modules. You can change their combination depending on the functional needs. I like the versatility of this design. You can expand it, if the space allows, or keep it compact. I also love the combination of wood and marble. It was is a collaborative effort. The woodwork was made by Pavel Brick and Matthias Marte of Verstak, and Aleksandr Baharev of Formadimarmo carved the marble.


Mathias Hahn as part of London’s Clerkenwell Design Week has introduced the Runcible Collection. Made from solid hard maple, the collection represents a familiar archetype, that is not limited to one specific task and are blanks that stand for a type of application but allow for individual use. Each piece is an implement for use in the home, but the exact functionality is diffused by experimenting with the expected aesthetic and form of such products, leaving them highly interpretive by the user. Hahn is an industrial designer, originally from Germany, and currently working in London where he started up his studio OKAYStudio in 2006. He studied both Industrial Design and Product Design, which has brought him to a body of work involving furniture, lighting and products. He has a natural desire for designing towards use and functionality and introduces me experimental curiosity to his way of working. Through his collaborations, commissioned and individual work, Hahn has remained dedicated to the minimalist principles and themes. The resulting Runcible Collection is testament to his dedication. There is a sophisticated simplicity to the way that he approaches materiality and the production process of remaining true to the materials core beauty. Photography courtesy of...


I was recently introduced to the New Zealand fashion brand, I Love Ugly — specifically their simple, stylish and sublime Samuel Watches Series. The Samuel Watch Series features a simplified design for a timeless touch. The minimal design provides an everyday wear and features a silicon strap for something different, laser engraved logo, hardened glass face and a quality finish. Available in black, grey and mint colours, this affordable series brilliantly captures the essence of a wrist watch with its clean, readable dial, thin time indicators and simplified brand mark. The minimalistic packaging must also be recognised as an example of beautiful design in itself.


Duncan Shotton, a young British designer based in Japan, created this fun and simple timepiece, called Color O’Clock. The all-white disk features a window at its base which slowly shifts through all colors of the spectrum, greens, purples, blues, and everything in between. This changing element allows you to tell the time through hue and tone. I love that the clock itself blends with the wall, only leaving the hands and the colorful window visible. Shotton thinks that this method of reading time is more relaxed and intuitive. The clock base is made of plastic, the hands are made of matt steel. Check out the video to see the piece in action.


Case Scenario’s Element iPhone 5 case is a minimalist dream. Made from plastic the intended aesthetic is to infer a marble stone finish. Available in both a black and white version, this piece is sleek but strong and timeless and elegant. Case Scenario are based on Monaco and create mobile accessories with functionality, design and style in mind with an emphasis on designing and collaborating for the European market, with particular detail to technology. The Element case, is clear testament to that. With the clean lines of the iPhone, it seems almost hypocritical to then adorn it with a contrasting case, which is too often the case. This piece is both well designed and thoughtful. Too rare is to find such a fitting iPhone accompaniment. Congrats to Case Scenario for this. Congrats. Photography courtesy of Case Scenario.


Restored is an Amsterdam based store that collects and sells unique products from talented designers and small labels, offering them a platform to share their products and visions with a wider public. An ode to beauty, balance and originality, Restored features a concise collection of simple, minimalist designs ranging from exquisite garments and accessories to wonderfully handcrafted household items — some of which you may already be familiar with, having previously been featured here on Minimalissimo. And today, we’re excited to share a few more with you. A store I would love to drop in on the next time I’m exploring the streets of Amsterdam, but for the time being, it’s a pleasure getting lost browsing their online shop. Restored are also kindly offering a 15% discount on all products until 30 June, using the code: ENJOYJUNE


Barcelona based designer Adolfo Abejon created this simple and witty lamp, aptly called Slim. Constructed from an iron pipe, the piece resembles the shape of the traditional post-and-shade lamp. The familiar form is stripped down to its mere outline, making Slim a minimalist version of the timeless classic. Abejon explains: The lamps play a joke on themselves. This collection reminds the archetype of lamps composed of a lampshade, a central body and the base. The design keeps this idea by breaking the parts and keeping the important things: a pipe is enough to hold the bulb and the lampshade is used just to protect the bulb in case of falling down. The lamp comes in floor and table versions and in three colors: black, white and turquoise.