Minimalissimo


Categorized “Industrial design”

Case Scenario’s Element iPhone 5 case is a minimalist dream. Made from plastic the intended aesthetic is to infer a marble stone finish. Available in both a black and white version, this piece is sleek but strong and timeless and elegant. Case Scenario are based on Monaco and create mobile accessories with functionality, design and style in mind with an emphasis on designing and collaborating for the European market, with particular detail to technology. The Element case, is clear testament to that. With the clean lines of the iPhone, it seems almost hypocritical to then adorn it with a contrasting case, which is too often the case. This piece is both well designed and thoughtful. Too rare is to find such a fitting iPhone accompaniment. Congrats to Case Scenario for this. Congrats. Photography courtesy of Case Scenario.


Restored is an Amsterdam based store that collects and sells unique products from talented designers and small labels, offering them a platform to share their products and visions with a wider public. An ode to beauty, balance and originality, Restored features a concise collection of simple, minimalist designs ranging from exquisite garments and accessories to wonderfully handcrafted household items — some of which you may already be familiar with, having previously been featured here on Minimalissimo. And today, we’re excited to share a few more with you. A store I would love to drop in on the next time I’m exploring the streets of Amsterdam, but for the time being, it’s a pleasure getting lost browsing their online shop. Restored are also kindly offering a 15% discount on all products until 30 June, using the code: ENJOYJUNE


Barcelona based designer Adolfo Abejon created this simple and witty lamp, aptly called Slim. Constructed from an iron pipe, the piece resembles the shape of the traditional post-and-shade lamp. The familiar form is stripped down to its mere outline, making Slim a minimalist version of the timeless classic. Abejon explains: The lamps play a joke on themselves. This collection reminds the archetype of lamps composed of a lampshade, a central body and the base. The design keeps this idea by breaking the parts and keeping the important things: a pipe is enough to hold the bulb and the lampshade is used just to protect the bulb in case of falling down. The lamp comes in floor and table versions and in three colors: black, white and turquoise.


DesignByThem collaborated with Seaton Mckeon to create the Alfred magazine rack; a minimalist and convenient organizer for your magazines or books. The inspiration for Alfred came from the cartoon-like aesthetics and industrial functionality that is reminiscent of cranes and cherry pickers. Its design is focused on lasting durability and functionality. A central handle was added to make it easy to move the rack around the space. The magazine rack is made of powder coated aluminium and is available in four colors including yellow, black, white, and blue. There must be one that will match your interior. Photography by Grant Harvey.


Pebble 2 is a minimalist smartphone wireless charger and bluetooth speaker by the French studio Orée. The piece is handcrafted from solid wood or marble and seamlessly blends with any workspace. The technology behind the product is quite intuitive and requires no learning curve. Simply place your smartphone on the Pebble 2 and your phone starts charging automatically and syncs instantly via bluetooth to the audio system built inside the Pebble. You can now enjoy the music or make hands-free phone calls. Here is how the designers describe their idea: Smartphones fit our mobile lifestlyle like a glove. Yet when we are at home or in the office, they just feel bulky: we’re never quite sure where we leave them, we scramble for the power cable to make sure they are charged up for our next errand and we cope with the poor sound quality of the built-in loudspeaker when we want to conveniently make hands-free calls or listen to music. We created Oree Pebble 2 so your smartphone elegantly fits your lifestyle at home or in the office. The device uses bluetooth and standard QI technology to wirelessly charge most Android devices. Because this technology is not yet embedded in iPhones, they...


A vision of the perfect watch — affordable as well as classic and trendy at the same time. It brought together an elaborate group of entrepreneurs from Switzerland, France, Italy, Belgium and Estonia under the name of Greyhours. Their dream was to design and market the most essential watches, combining sober elegance with modern solidity. Two beautiful minimalistic models have come to life since Greyhours made its dream come true. One black, one white, both very expressive in their pure essence. While Greyhours relies on traditional Swiss watchmaking expertise, this is combined with forward-looking manufacturing techniques from Asia. This way, they bring together classic materials like italian leather with modern techniques, such as diamond-like carbon coating. The most alluring aspect about Greyhours watches is their nostalgia-free approach towards an item that can and should be handed down from generation to generation, while telling a story about the moment in history in which it was designed. Greyhours are also offering our Minimalissimo readers a 15% discount with the code: XX-FEEH-E73F-1807-8975


This minimalist Piggy Bank is created by Selma Durand during her Master thesis of Industrial Design in ENSCI-Les Ateliers, Paris. Durand wanted to focus on the everyday situation where people collect pocket change without being aware of its value. In fact they usually put it in a pin tray where it stays untouched. Especially the cent coins are undervalued and one can use Piggy Bank to collect those. Piggy Bank, made of a ceramic outer container and a brass inner container, uses a clever hidden mechanism to weigh the pocket change as coins are stacking. Both containers level when the value of the coins is approximately 1 euro. I chose to focus on 1 euro because it is a standard unit which also corresponds to the price of a baguette, a coffee or a stamp. Being one stashing my pocket change in an old box, where it stays untouched, I really like the thought behind this minimalist piggy bank. Love the combination of materials too.


Rene Schwolow’s Units of Time assembles as a triage of time telling line work. Made of powder-coated aluminum, the series of time telling devices are intended as a series of wall clocks with continuous sweeping elements. German-based designer, Schwolow is playing with time and its ephemeral nature through form. She plays with the idea of time being a notion that exists through the physical manifestation of its present through the clock. Units of Time discusses the subject of experience and perishability of time, as well as its apparent non-existence. Each piece of the series shows one element of time; hour, minute and second. Schwowlow is pushing the boundaries of our conceived notions through the simplification of something that truly has the power to control our actions. Through this simplification and stripped back motion, perhaps she is also asking us to see the beauty in time also; piece by piece. Photography courtesy of Rene Schwolow.


Issey Miyake is notable for its challenging take on the general concept of fashion. Along with the clever mind of artistic designer Tokujin Yoshioka, the collaboration between two creative visions have produced the TO watch collection that is both minimal in design and unique in material usage. TO, having four versions varied from SILAN001 to SILAN004, the fusion of the metal dial and the leather strap gives a certain boldness and masculinity to the user. With three circular layers, two for each hand, and one for the time marks, which bleed to the edge of the dial, there is something monumental about this small-scale piece of accessory. SILAN003 is the one that stands out the most to me, due to the contrast between the silver and the black, as well as the textures of the two materials. The correspondent silver buckle also helps heighten the elegance of this particular watch. Not only the watch is cautiously designed, its packaging is also carefully articulated with the use of metal spin-brushing. Nesting inside the black foam and the simple instruction is the product itself, waiting to embrace the wrist of the modern man. Photo Courtesy of Andrew Kim


Adelaide-based collaborative duo Daniel Emma have partnered with Field to bring Magnifier onto the stage. Essentially it is a magnifier, beautifully crafted from brass with a brushed seamless finish. This piece also acts as a handsome paperweight and serious desk accompaniment. Daniel Emma is comprised of Daniel To and Emma Aiston who established their practice in 2008 after graduating in 2007. They studied concurrently in the industrial design discipline in Adelaide. Their work has been shown in Paris, Tokyo, New York, and Berlin and throughout Australia after first showing in London in 2008, early on. Their list of current exhibitions is endless and recognition within the design field also through their design work and installations is commendable. Available through Field, Magnifier is an extension of the duo’s ethos to create the unexpected from simple objects using simple forms. Photography courtesy of Leonhard Hilzensauer.


In collaboration with AUDI Design, Leica introduces the Leica T — a new mirror-less compact camera system that features a beautifully minimalistic design, and engineered out of a single block of aluminium. The Leica T features a large APS-C sensor with 16.5 megapixels, ensuring colour fidelity, the finest details and pictures with exceptional brightness and clarity. A 3.7” touchscreen display handles the majority of functions with a simple, intuitive design, and with an integrated wi-fi module, sharing your photos has been made incredibly easy. The craftsmanship that goes into making Leica T is remarkable. Watch the video to see for yourself → Focused on what is essential — the sheer joy of photography. Simple and brilliant with a stunning aesthetic.


Aura mirror series is a beautiful project by the Norwegian designer Bjørn van den Berg, where the hemispherical shaped mirrors are converted into a whole reflecting object, not just a surface. The project is about tactility and sensibility. Aura’s format relates to fit into two open hands. When the object is exposed to light, the light is reflected differently from the flat mirror surface and the circular body; making you aware of your surroundings and the changes in light. The series consists of a wall and table mirror and they have been developed using solid aluminium, electroplated with copper, chrome or nickel, producing a wonderful finish.