Minimalissimo


Categorized “Table lamp”

It is now our third feature of the work by Takuro Yamamoto Architects. However this time, it is not an architectural structure, but rather a complement to the living space. With an eye and a mind for minimal designs, the firm recently launched a series of lamps under the name of Minimal Green, consisting of Twig, Blossom, Bud and Flower. While the former two elegantly stand tall with their elongated thin bodies, Bud and Flower are more modest, acting as the younger siblings of this collection. It is in the details that one can differentiate the four from one another: on the trunk of these lamps, branches sprout out of the body to imitate the rustic feeling of plants, as the designer put. Not only do they act as an aesthetic communicator, but they can also be functional — used as a hanger for lightweight accessories and outerwear. I especially find Blossom the most provocative. Its straight body extends up to then flourish into a white mass, supported by a bent brach that plays with the eyes. The structure’s offset is what makes it interesting and intriguing, while its simplicity helps put it on the top of my wish-list.


Federico Floriani’s 123 Lamp is a kit of minimalist parts. The sinuous composition of these elements is just the gravy. Italian industrial and graphic designer Floriani has conceived this source of illumination through a want of pushing structure abstraction to explore new aesthetics and leave behind the classic bulb. The result sees a solid oak wood body that uses two metal legs as a stand. Intended as a focused desk light that is consciously designed with minimalist lines and a simplified form. The 123 Lamp encourages a sense of interaction and engagement with the user, as well as being beautifully executed. Photography courtesy of Federico Floriani.


Magneto is a minimalist table lamp created by French studio Hekla. The piece is comprised of two parts – a metal base and an autonomous lighting source, made out of wood and fitted with an LED strip. Thanks to the magnetic component inside the wooden part, you can freely move the light, attach it at any angle and easily customize the direction of the light. I love how versatile the piece is. You can put it together in many different ways as a table lamp. You can also take it completely apart and attach the lighting component to any metal surface around the house. Very clever.


Young Canadian designer Mark Parsons is the creative force behind this beautiful light object. Aptly called Silhouette, the piece repeats Edison’s classic in shape, but surpasses it greatly in function. Designer explains:  The objective was to create a lamp that can adapt from wall, ceiling, floor or task lighting, while being manufactured to be as inexpensive & environmentally friendly as possible. The name Silhouette sprung from a literal nod at the traditional form of the incandescent light bulb whose basic design and form had remained unchanged for over 100 years.  If you want to hang it from the ceiling (my favorite option), you can use a special adaptor that comes with the lamp. Silhouette is a concept piece so far, and I really hope it sees the light of production.


Roll is a recent minimalist creation of French designer Ferréol Babin. The T-shaped object combines in itself a well thought-out functional idea with visual simplicity. The piece is composed of two independent yet complementary elements. The tube with the lighting source fits on the base. Thanks to the rotational motion, you can adjust the light, going from an indirect and soft one, to a direct light perfect for reading or working. I also love how portable Roll is. You can easily take it apart for storage and transportation. The transformer is hidden inside the hollow body of the lamp, which is another beautiful touch.


Cords and cables are notorious destroyers of visual peace and laconic beauty in minimalist designs. That is why it is so unusual to see a minimalist idea sprang from a humble cord and not much else. Petrus Palmér Jonas Pettersson and John Löfgren of Swedish studio Form Us With Love created the Cord Lamp for the brand Design House Stockholm. A textile cord is merged with a steel tube, holding aloft an oversized globe bulb. Here is how designers describe the concept: You can let it irritate you, break your neck tripping over it, or you can surrender, hide it behind the skirting board or press it into a groove. But it’s smarter to make friends with the enemy. Cord Lamp turns the cursed flex into a simple eye-catcher. If there’s any message to a lamp, just for the fun of it, what about ‘make peace not war’. I love how delicate the piece looks. A simple cord and a simple bulb, just by being made a focal point, appear quite exquisite.


New York based industrial designer and artist William Lee recently presented his latest offering at NY Design Week. This is Switch, a limited edition, minimalist lamp that engages interaction through its own function. The desk/bedside lamp draws inspiration from two places; a typical on/off switch on the wall, coupled with Lee’s interest for art direction, visual balance, and structure. Stripped down to its bare essentials, Switch is made entirely of an acrylic construction with 60 LEDs hidden underneath. Lee explains: In off mode, it faces down in an unassuming flat position. When toggled on, Switch brings an illuminating surprise and takes on another shape by its new orientation. The weighted base grounds the form, leaving a minimal cantilever in its architectural essence. What’s unique about Switch is its rechargeable power and detachable cable. In an age of digital technology where everyday objects communicate or work seamlessly, a portable lamp was appropriate where it can be placed virtually anywhere that light is needed in or outdoors, untethered and free. It’s a combination of Switch’s mobility and exquisite style that impresses so much. I have no doubt that this will be in high demand. Beautiful work.


Donna Bates’ rural Irish background has highly influenced her first lighting collection, Parlour Lighting. The series was inspired by her early years growing up on a farmyard where the lighting vessels themselves echo glass vats found in a milking parlour. Launched at the Clerkenwell Design Week in May 2013 in London, the collection is a series of six differing shapes and lighting sizes. The Parlour Lighting collection of vessels takes inspiration from the milking parlour and the receiving, which were used to collect the milk from the cows. The collection comprises options of colours and finishes; black, green or blue frames and oak or walnut-turned bases. Bates has made a considered effort to engage local craftspeople, where the pieces are hand-blown by the same manufacturers that used to create the jars for the dairy industry. The designer feels passionate about design, but equally so about supporting local hand skilled makers. The reference is one of considered nostalgia, trending with current design and the consideration of re-use. While referencing local ways of life, past and present, the aesthetic has a warmth and familiarity. The combination of clear and frosted glass elements, together with the discreet bulb selection, all enhance the warmth...


Thin lines and effortless functionality are but two mere elements of Daniel Rybakken’s Ascent table lamp designed for Luceplan. Presented at Euroluce, in Milan 2013, this piece is made from a combination of aluminium and technopolymer and is available in two alternate versions, with or without a standing base. In the base-less option, there exists an anchor bolt. In both options, the lamp is designed to be suitable for larger public spaces as well as domestic use. Disassembled, the elements that comprise the Ascent table lamp are traditionally recognisable. However, its Rybakken’s reinterpretation of its reassembly that is impressive. Mounted on a slender vertical stem, by moving the head along the stem the light intensity goes from being turned off at the bottom position, to gradually ascending to the full light output at the top. This ease of use, and variation in customisation, affords the user the ability to control the light intensity, but also the spread of the light. Daniel Rybakken, based on Norway, has a growing portfolio of work that spreads installation, lighting and illumination experimentations. With a background in Fine Arts and Design, his work spans across both disciplines, pushing boundaries through innovation on both accounts. The...


Spot is a multipurpose light, created by Gloria Ngiam, Nigel Geh & Guillaume Bloget. Its simple design consists of only two parts – a 10 watt LED and a handle, with which it can be hung, hand-held, or placed on a surface as a table lamp. Made from durable water-resistant polypropylene (PP) material, the piece is suitable for outdoor use. We were inspired by the simplicity, and functionality of industrial work lights. With SPOT, we retained the mobility of conventional torches and industrial work lights, as well as the dynamic rotational movement of theatrical stage lights. Stripping them down to their essentials and introduced an element of playfulness to it, bringing you a refreshing design of a functional light. I love how versatile and visually unobtrusive this design is. To reserve your own Spot light check out the Indiegogo campaign currently running for the piece.


Rim table lamp by Japanese born Paris based designer Jun Yasumoto is a simplified take on the lampshade idea. Made of steel, aluminium and lampshade fabric, the piece diffuses light on one side and reflects it on the other. The circular frame moves freely around the bulb, allowing the user to chose different angles and control the direction of the light.  Designer claims that the minimalist style of Rim was only partly chosen for aesthetic reasons. The simple construction eliminates a complex production process and makes manufacturing more affordable. Rim lamp comes in black and yellow.


This elegant lamp has been created by Berlin based designer Uli Budde for Slovenian lighting brand Vertigo Bird. Inspired by traditional oil lamps, the piece produces warm diffused light. The effect is achieved by the three simple elements – a bulb, a cylindrical base and a thin diffuser, leaning over it. Here is how designer describes the piece: The lamp’s light source is situated inside a cylindrical base. Light shines upwards and lights the reflector, which tilts forwards, re-directing and reflecting a diffused glimmer of light. If you look at the lamp full face, it resembles an air balloon (hence the name). It is made from lacquered aluminium and plastic and is available in white or yellow.