Minimalissimo


Categorized “Bottle”

Swedish label Tangent Garment Care stands for cleanliness with a conscience. Organic, biologically degradable, free of synthetic additives, deep cleaning and mild, their products treat your clothes (even the most sensitive natural fabrics such as silk and wool) with the attention and care that they deserve. Aside being great products, the branding is something rather special too. Simple, pure design by Swedish independent brand agency, Essen International. Tangent GC’s branding was developed by Essen’s Creative Director, Carl Johan Näs, who has also designed their new plastic series, which is due for release in October of this year. From the clean, descriptive labelling, to the beautiful, fitting typography, every one of Tangent GC’s products impress.


Manifiesto Futura, an independent multidisciplinary design studio based in Monterrey, Mexico, have recently added to their impressive design portfolio with this minimalist identity and packaging for the tequila based alcoholic drink, Tiqo. Tiqo is apparently a drink for a quiet moonlit night gathering at the beach, which is echoed by the circular forms in the sleek geometric logotype. Even with the stark colour palette of the bottle, it still has a strong presence and would unlikely go unnoticed on a supermarket shelf. It’s always refreshing to see such design simplicity in alcohol packaging.


Product Designer Simon Hasan has an exquisite collection of laboratory-grade borosilicate glassware in the form of a bottle, carafe and decanter, all carefully hand crafted and wrapped in leather. I am drawn to the simplicity of the details of this set of Wrap Glassware. The brass pins complete the beautiful sequence of the design,  emphasizing the contrast of materials while the use of the leather softens normally sterile-looking objects. I know a space in my living room just for this.


Japanese designer Kota Kobayashi, currently based in New York, has brewed as well as designed the beautifully minimalist packaging for Ippon Matsu Beer, to benefit a great cause. On the northeastern shore of Japan, a forest of 70,000 pine trees lined the coast of Rikuzentakata. In 2011, these pines were destroyed during the Tōhoku tsunami effect, and now only one pine remains. Kobayashi explains: This beer’s name means ‘One Pine Tree’ and its design is a symbol of charity and hope for Japan’s brighter future. A scroll-like, handwritten label seals the top with its story written on the inside. The label is a solitary pine made of three triangles facing up, symbolising the wish for progress in the reconstruction efforts. The packaging has been selected as one of the winners for Communication Arts Design Annual 2012. All profits support the reconstruction effort. Now, I just want to know how the beer tastes!


Italian full service advertising agency, Concept Store, based in Pescara, have designed this elegant, minimal and beautifully presented wine packaging for Vecchie Vigne. The design, lead by Marco D’Aroma of Concept Store, has a clear minimal layout for the label’s flagship store, Gentile, which includes a beautiful use of typography, spacing and colour contrast. The preciousness of the product is given by the care and study of individual details, ranging from the choice of paper and clever use of black and white lettering. The wine itself, is a red 2009 reserve, however I am unable to give you an opinion on the taste. If you happen to taste Vecchie Vigne at some point in the future, please share your thoughts. In the meantime, I hope you enjoy this packaging as much as I do.


This laconic and visually stimulating packaging has been recently unveiled by Australian beverage manufacturer Capi. The company specializes on carbonated drinks and mineral waters. Capi’s brand claim includes producing pure, clean, and refreshing beverages from the finest natural extracts and botanicals. With the statement like this, it comes as no surprise that the packaging follows the idea of clutter-free simplicity. Here is how CIP Creative, the force behind the project, describes Capi’s new visual identity: CIP Creative were engaged to create a Strong Brand Mark and distinctive packaging. When creating the brand and associated labels, we aimed for a crisp, fresh, no nonsense visual language puled together by a sharp logotype. I love how the font corresponds to the shape of the bottles, making words big and tangible. And with nothing to obstruct the view of the contents, the product can speak for itself.


Coca-Cola Light is the sponsor of ARCO, the International Contemporary Art Fair that opens today in Madrid, and for celebrating it they have made a special edition of their classic bottle. It is made of aluminium with a pearl white background and has two of the most representative icons in Arco: a red circle that indicates when a work has been acquired and a label that describes the work, including the tittle, measures and the technique used. I really enjoy this kind of works where a brand reduce its image to the minimum expression.


Alcohol packaging usually has a very traditional design because of the age of the brands, so this design by Maas Design for VODA vodka captured my attention. The designers explain: Alcohol packaging often looks to the companies past for its inspiration. Since this was a new brand conceived in the modern digital age we had fun with the idea of using the “play” icon recognizable from many of today’s digital devices. The contemporary design was meant to target a younger audience of vodka drinkers and players. I would like to point out the visible cork: not only an interesting contrast in the design (old vs. new), but it also says ‘traditional quality’ in a contemporary jacket.


Designed by German student Sascha Elmers, these pictogram wine bottle labels are cute and iconic, making the bottles visually appealing and minimal. Simple pictographs are used to illustrate the relationship between the wine and the food with which it should be paired. The definitive pictographs also act to substitute the lengthy descriptions often printed on wine labels.


Finally, a brand that is going into the food industry and giving it a new brand identity that turns away from all what we’ve come to grown accustomed to. PRIMVS FOOD, designed by NTGJ from Portugal, is planning on launching exclusively in Japan (of course), and a world wide launch at a later date. The packaging is a beautiful minimalist approach, with beautiful observation to detail. I hope they taste as good as they look, and hope they expand out of Japan fast as I need some harmony in my kitchen.


Heineken and French designer ORA-ÏTO teamed up again after previous collaborations. Back in 2002 ORA-ÏTO received the ‘oscar for the best packaging’ for his aluminum Heineken bottle. The outcome of the latest collaboration is a new limited edition set of 100% sustainable aluminum bottles; the Icone Pure. ORA-ÏTO is the brand name of the designer Ito Morabito. Morabito describes his style as simplexity. He says: All my designs look very simple, but I can tell you it is very complex to make it happen. The new bottle is white with a green dotted inscription and featuring the iconic green logo of Heineken on the front and back.


Green messages…yada yada yada. “Use less soap, save the planet.” Now we’re really talking green. There is something about a “just-add-water” cleaning solution that appeals to my green-minded conscience. Although I remain a city girl at heart. People Planet, a Canadian manufacturer of green cleaning products, has a winning formula for iQ, a household cleaner. The major ingredient of iQ is water. It comes in an abbreviated package; a spray bottle which you fill with tap water to dilute the cleaning product, a plant-based concentrate delivered in cartridges. After running out of detergent, just replace the cartridge and refill the original spray bottle with water. Add a little bit of water to your all-purpose cleaner and voilá—the “keep things simplest” vibe is in effect.