Minimalissimo


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We recently caught up with Håndværk to discuss the brand, its designs, fabrics, and future. Describe your path to creating the brand, Håndværk. We felt there was a void in the market for a label that was solely dedicated to high-end essentials — crafting each piece from the finest fabrics, and focused on the details as the foundation to function. From the start, the ultimate goal was to create a label that we would love as customers, something that would make us proud. Our passion for fine fabrics was the main force driving Håndværk’s creation. Håndværk is an interesting & unusual brand name. Can you explain why you choose it? It is a Danish word that stands for artisanal, a trade, or handy-work. We felt it represents the soul of the label. At the core, we want to highlight that pride achieved by the craftsman with his honest work. We want to convey that making quality garments is a humble and tedious endeavour, miles away from the hype of the fashion world. We have always been huge fans of Danish design, specifically mid-century modern furniture — with the focus on simplicity, honest materials and function. These values influence how we go...


Bernaskoni’s Arc is a bold and beautiful statement in the Russian landscape. Completed in 2012 and standing at 72 sqm, it is built on the border between forest and field and is a hybrid that performs several functions. As is a traditional statement of entry, through the presence of an arch or gate, Arc stands as a somewhat nod to that nostalgia. Spatially, Arc is a spiral staircase that includes a portal, an observation deck, a bar and also a well within. Within the sculpture, there exists an artist’s room, that every year the room is transformed into an art installation. Bernaskoni’s intention, being contextually sensitive, was to minimize waste as key. Arc is therefore comprised of a series of six-meter length boards where all off-cuts have been reused on site as structural elements which is then painted black. This Russian beauty is a sensitive and considered addition to the portal transitioning the structured human-worked landscape into the wild, untamed one. Photography courtesy of Bernaskoni and Yuri Palmin.


Jil Sander’s 2015 Resort collection is one heavily influenced by themes of movement. The pieces themselves, the cuts and the execution seem to mirror the flurry of design movement of the label. Staying true to the minimalist principles of the label, the collection is a synergy of crisp shapes that appeared to have liquid coursing through them and know constructions that create volume in simple jackets. There is an overt influence of versatility. The label, once described as the queen of less, despite said movements, has maintained its clarity and modern classic appeal. Timeless in its approach, Jil Sander has continued to show a dedication to tailoring and focus in the Resort 2015 collection. There is an effortless to each piece, curating an assemblage of want. I for one, am wanting of that timeless want. Photography courtesy of Jil Sander.


Lucas Dias is a young Brazilian photographer and video-artist based in Barcelona who has recently opened the second show of his touring exhibition Cuerpos Urbanos (Urban Bodies). The series of double-exposures explores the limit between people and their surroundings — the skin of the body and the skin of the city — ultimately communicating the complexity of those relationships in an elegant, effortless manner. It is in the limit between body and landscape that the proposal for Urban Bodies is drawn. In an attempt of reenchantment with the world, diaphanous mirages are drawn, ethereal and subtle, provoking the observer’s eye. They reveal skins of transparent folds, and within the folds, invisible landscapes. With a background in Architecture studies, Lucas maintains the concept of ephemeral and diaphanous even in the exhibition design — the images were printed in large plates of transparent acetate, floating suspended in the air. Discussing the process behind his work, he reveals that Cuerpos Urbanos was the result of long and painful exploration, after many experiments and thoughts, confirming that a simple result is often the culmination of many iterations and hard work. Cuerpos Urbanos will be open at the aDa Gallery in Barcelona until the end of June...


Noisli — a project by Italian multidisciplinary designer Stefano Merlo — is an ambient high-quality sound and colour generator for working and relaxing. The sounds are designed to help you focus while working, relieve anxiety or just to relax. You may already be familiar with the web version, but today Noisli release their beautiful new iOS app for both iPad and iPhone. The app features various sounds including, rain, thunderstorm, bonfire, forest, train and seaside — all of which can be toggled and layered with varying emphasis, to produce your ideal sound combination. The app also features a built-in timer function, which can be used during work, creativity sessions or to simply fall asleep. The Noisli app lets you play all of the sounds offline and therefore you can enjoy its features and benefits while travelling, commuting or any other activity with no need for an internet connection. Since downloading the iPhone app, I have found the rain and thunderstorm combination a particular favourite when I require focus. An everyday app with a beautiful and minimalist user-interface. Available for download on iTunes →


Nostromo is a minimalist note taking app for iPhone, created by studio Coloramama. It allows you taking notes, making photos, incorporating existing images from your phone library, and creating sketches all in one interface. The navigation is fluid, intuitive, and requires zero learning curve. I love the cross-shaped control that lets you switch between the four functions. It is also pleasing that the app loads extremely fast on my phone. A slick, simplified tool for note taking that is delightful to the senses.


Mindarin introduced me to their wonderful new iOS app that I have had the pleasure of using for the last couple of weeks, that not only offers a wonderful user experience, but also features a beautifully minimal display. The app is Luna — a calculator that makes calculations instantly as you type, while keeping your expression clean and readable. It allows you to save your results as well as complete calculations, operate them, edit them, and create lists. The designers explain: We designed Luna to be truly useful. Most iOS calculators differentiate by adding cute gestures or pretty colours, our goal was to create the ultimate useful calculator, one you could use to do a quick operation or keep track of your business expenses. But keep it simple, clean and minimal. Admittedly, there are a couple of minor bugs with Luna, but as with every newly developed app, the more it is used, the better it can become. It is the aesthetics of Luna that leaves me impressed though along with the feature to alternate between black and white themes with a simple shake of the device.


22 year-old Josef Lang of Many Hands Design brings a Scandinavian edge to modern American industrial design. Inspired by functional, materiality and the fine arts, there is an overt emphasis on rendering quality, imaginative and appropriate responses to needs of modern design. CR stands for the cantilevered rod and 45 is the area code for calling Denmark. CR45 was initially conceived during Lang’s study abroad period in Denmark in 2013. The studio in which this piece was conceived, involved being split up by material, meaning each student was allowed only one specific material for the structure of their pieces. This exploration and understanding of materiality is obvious in the beautifully articulate execution of CR45. Structurally the biggest and most obvious exploration with this piece is that of cantilevering elements. Comprised of a high-carbon cold-rolled steel alloy space frame, the seat component is made with a sash cord, which has a nylon core and cotton exterior for both strength and comfort. Josef Lang is one to watch. Photography courtesy of Robert Bingaman.


Multerim is a polished minimal timer app, recently released by Evan Gulyas. It is designed for the multitasker and is useful to someone who has to juggle several deadlines at a time. The sleek intuitive interface allows you to set and name multiple timers. It required a bit of a learning curve, but once you have figured out the principle, it is very easy to set up, name, adjust and start up to six different timers. The time is arranged vertically, the upper squares give you hours, the middle ones – minutes, and the bottom ones – seconds. Swipe any square to set up a timer, tap with two fingers to start it, tap and drag to give it a name. And to reset everything, just swipe across the screen with two fingers. A good-looking app with the clear purpose.


The Minimalissimo team would like to wish you all happy holidays and a very Merry Christmas. We appreciate all of our new and longstanding readers and we hope to continue featuring beautiful minimalist designs every single day of 2014. Thank you also for all your support and feedback this year. We always enjoy a good, passionate discussion. — Carl, Adele, Bronwyn, Jillian, Jorge, Marina, Melle, Natalia, Nhat & Niels-Peter. The simple and beautifully decorated tree you see featured is by Los Cabos based freelance graphic designer, Alejandrina Bessoberto. Her design blog is a favourite of ours, which often offers an insight into Ale’s incredibly stylish home.


Systems is an exhibition of commissioned poster designs and ‘60s Braun products, presented in a single grid at the Walter Knoll London showroom from 25 Nov – 31 Dec 2013. The exhibition is curated by das programm and produced in association with Braun. An international group of graphic designers respond to the systematicity of Braun Design, each one of them notably minimalist, such as Experimental Jetset, Hey Studio, Ross Gunter, Antonio Carusone, Spin, Tomasz Berezowski, Spin and more. Featured here is Berlin–based studio Neubau‘s series of posters, exploring the concepts of Form, Typography and Colour. Find out more about each poster and the specific concept developed in each design. All the works are available for purchase as a limited edition of A1 prints, individually or as a cased set. I’d love one in my living room!


100 Colors is a solo exhibition created by the French-born and Tokyo-based architect Emmanuelle Moureaux, as part of the 17-day art event Shinjuku Creators Festa 2013. As its name suggests, the installation is formed of 100 different hues of color along 840 sheets of paper neatly suspended from the ceiling, which were provided by leading Japanese paper manufacturer Takeo. The whole combination creates an amazing volume of vibrant color where each sheet creates a gradual transition to the next. Beneath the installation there are bean bags to invite visitors to watch and admire the piece from different perspectives. The 100 colors are also featured on the wall in small circles, allowing the visitors to indicate their preference in color.