Minimalissimo


Milan-based architect Victor Vasilev partnered with the Italian manufacturer Boffi, to create an innovative shelving solution in blind shape. Vasilev was inspired by the profiles of buildings, touching the sky, in big cities. The breakdown of the volumes of the buildings has created a series of staggered floors which may contain seveal objects, creating a fascinating urban setting. The modular shelving system, named CTline, are blinds with inside vertical storage units, like staggered floors, varying in height and depth. The characteristic composition with its irregular profile really strikes the eye. The modular shelving units, made of a matte-white Betacryl solid surface material, can be positioned to suit specific needs. There are six different proportions to complement your home. The bathroom unit comes fitted with a mirror on inclined front side.


String Series is a work in steel developed by the London based designer Dean Edmonds, with it also being an homage to the string chair. Without doubt, an interesting experiment that uses the resistance of the steel to create a minimalist and light chair design, contrasting with the appearance of the steel. The designer explains: By using an all steel construction the string has become a structural element, in turn, reducing the structure itself. Although at first brutal in appearance I hope to show the beauty and fragility that steel can possess much like the string of the chair that was at first the inspiration.


Situated in a small village in Portugal is the Taíde House, a renovation of an old mill into a beautiful modern home. The house was thoughtfully designed by Rue Vieira Oliveira and Vasco Manuel Fernandes. The structure is relatively small, so as not to interrupt the surrounding environment. The kitchen, living room, and office are located on the ground floor. Two bedrooms sit on the upper level, accessed by a stunning floating staircase. When looking at the structure, it is easy to determine the old and new. The rough stone base is inherited from the old mill. Everything white is assumed new. The interior, all renovated, uses limited materials: white for the walls, hardwood floors, and marble in the bathrooms. The result is a truly minimal design. Each element of Taíde House is expertly curated, creating a home that falls nothing short of perfection. Photography by Fernando Guerra FG+SG.


Annaleena’s Clothing Rails collection is beautiful and unassuming. Their boldness sits almost idle while the scale and breadth are the focus. Manufactured by hand-forging Iron, these geometric forms become suspended sculptures. Their presence prevails its functional pragmatism and they become an invited addition to the architecture of a space. Annaleena’s vision is based on the idea that her work is a collection of things where uniqueness and handcraft meet and create. Based in Svartsjo in Sweden, her body of work is mainly sculptural, but at a scale that engages the user and creates an immediate element of interaction. Available in circular, square and rectangular shapes, these pieces embody Annaleena’s vision to live in free creativity and personal expression. Photography courtesy of Annaleena.


Kai — @wk.ai — is a Malaysian born architectural intern, currently working in Tokyo, Japan. Today we speak to Kai and gain an insight into his wonderfully captured Instagram collection, which primarily focuses on minimalism in architecture. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? My collection is about decontextualising architecture and challenges the boundary between buildings and abstraction. Architecture become axiomatic objects in my photos, which turn our attention from judging the structural quality to the appreciation of atmosphere and pure feelings. To me the album is also a dictionary of architectural language that awaits new and broader implementation. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? I spend most of my weekends hunting for architecture and visiting art galleries in Tokyo. It is a very admirable and inspiring city as it is so recognisable and successful in interpreting modern culture with their own dialect, which many cities are still in search of. But my stay in Tokyo triggers my aspiration, as an urbanite, for tranquility; that is why my photos tends to be isolated from its context. When and how do you decide to take a photo? I’ve been travelling around Europe. Taking photographs is a way of...


Let us have a look at COS. Thought up by the H&M group in 2007 and led by brand manager Marie Honda since 2011, the London based brand is keen to develop a tactile functional style that lives beyond the seasons. COS — which abbreviates Concept Of Style — proves that there is a chance for better quality and sophisticated silhouettes in the mass market. The Autumn/Winter 2014 looks also prove that the popularity of precise and sharp styling as well as elaborate photography has tremendously increased during the last seven years. The current collection itself is inspired by Patti Smith and Nick Cave, as well as the photographs of architect John Pawson.


Based in Portland, Oregon and hailing from Los Angeles, designer T Ngu has recently released three new collections within her lovely and elegant Upper Metal Class jewellery line: Arc, Grace and Wave. Boasting a  minimalist style with a hint of light hearted fun, each hand-crafted design is developed with simplicity in mind while drawing inspiration from architecture, math, science and the natural life around us. Personally, I’m enjoying the fresh, minimalist use of typical geometrical shapes found not only within our surroundings but also in busier visual styles like the renaissance of Memphis-inspired graphics. UMC also seeks to follow an environmental friendly practice, using recycled metals and packaging that is biodegradable. Photography by Dawn Di Carlo.


In this age of rapid developments, more architecture firms have resorted to the method of adapt-and-reuse — a sustainable approach to repurposing unused structures. Recently, Dominique Coulon et Associés, a French architecture firm, have inserted openings for light to an original concrete building. They also enhanced the original two swimming pools and bleachers with a synchronizing blue color that unites the interior space. On the exterior, grey concrete were applied onto the extension to expand the old building’s facade and create a continuous conversation between the old and the new. The children’s area is doubled in height with curved walls, resulting in a spacious area that holds a different spatial quality. At the resting area, there is an organically shaped opening that provides a visual connection to the private garden. The minimal approach that the architects have adopted to the original structures, was what captivated me so much in the first place. The clean division of blue and white, and the play of curved and geometric lines, engulf this swimming complex with different pockets of space. In my opinion, such a simple change to the interior can cause a big direction of change in the usage of a building —...


Located in a residential area of the northwestern part of Takashima, Shiga Prefecture, Japan, lies a beautifully minimalist white structure. On the first floor is an aesthetic dental clinic White Essence Takashima and on the second floor an aesthetic salon — Salon de M. Following his client’s requirements, designer Ryutaro Matsuura explains: The building can give the neighbourhood a sense of affinity and good impressions as a symbolic object in the town. The interior offers a the space that is enclosed by four buildings into a void area with a top light. It was turned into a comfortable place with natural light. Perforated metal screens are fixed on the outside of the windows of the first floor treatment rooms to set up buffer spaces bridging the inside and outside. This made the cozy treatment spaces with soft daylight and patient privacy. Waiting in a dental surgery has never been so pleasant. We hope that this building will endear itself to the town’s people and be nurtured by them as a new landmark of the town. In this Japanese town, a visit to the dentist will no longer a daunting experience.


Pâtisserie À la Folie is a lovely little bake shop in Montréal, Canada. Designed by the Montréal based firm Atelier Moderno, this shop uses a minimal, neutral palette to show off the baked goods. The interior is a renovation of a former retail space. Existing concrete floors and exposed brick are painted in a warm, soft gray tone. Natural wood panelling has been added to parts of the ceiling and walls as a contrast to all the gray. A few hanging lights illuminate the register and display cases. While the design of this bakery is stunning, the real star of this interior are the rows and rows of colorful macaroons, pastries, and cakes. I love how the store’s simple palette highlights the goods for sale. Pâtisserie À la Folie is a bakeshop not easily missed on the streets of Montréal!


Yield Design’s Geo Stand Set adds an elements of quirk. This trio of sculptural anecdotes can be used as paperweights, name cards, photo holders, business card holders or sculptural elements. Made from brushed brass, these geometric pieces are beautifully executed. Yield’s emphasis on no need for compromise sees this series produced with an attention to detail, where sustainability and ethical production are not at odds. This is great to see. Their claim that the buyer should buy for keeps or please do not buy at all is one of boldness and a refreshing response to an ever increasing consumerist culture. Based in St Augustine, and conceived in San Francisco, Yield is a duo to watch. Photography courtesy of Yield.


I was recently introduced to Taiwan based design studio, Chi and Chi. The studio has a strong minimalist aesthetic, designing everyday objects with content and purpose, and with simple functions in their essential forms. A standout design? This striking Polygon watch. The Polygon watch is a modern and unique timepiece with special geometric features in shape. The elements on the watch are designed with simple geometrical forms consistently and unlike the usual round contours of regular watches. The 24-cut case and dial present the time in a distinctive aesthetic way, which enriches the sense of touch as well as the sense of sight. Featuring a 316L stainless steel case housing a precise Japanese movement and a durable genuine calf-leather strap, the Polygon timepiece is a unisex watch available in three colour combinations — silver/grey, gold/black, and gold/brown. I particularly like the grey. Absolutely beautiful.