Minimalissimo


Atelier Peekaboo recently created a minimalist ceramic piggy bank named Sur les toits. The English translation is “on top of the roofs” and refers to the place where they found inspiration for the shape of the design. One easily inserts the money in the slot on top of the piggy bank and incase one needs the money, there is no need to crack the ceramic; just angle the piggy bank and shake gently. The prototypes, ranging in colours and sizes, have been handcrafted by the Fribourg based ceramist Peter Fink. Atelier Peekaboo was founded in 2008 by two Swiss designers from Neuchâtel. Damien Ummel and Thierry Didot met during their studies at the École Cantonale d’Art de Lausanne (ECAL). The two decided to strenght forces and by permanently questioning the industrial designer’s role in a society surrounded by objects, they try to provide elements to respond to it.


Clinq hanger by German-Latvian studio Flow Design is an idea so simple and logical, it is almost taunting. These magnetic hangers attach to any metal tube or surface without hooks. The user only needs to move the piece next to a metallic bar, and it snaps in place with a satisfying click. The magnets are strong enough for the hanger to support the weight of two kilos. Another neat thing about this design is that magnets naturally repel each other, creating even gaps between the hangers in the closet. And if you are not using some of the hangers, you can easily stack them on top of each other to save space. Clinq is handmade in the EU, using local resources, and comes in black, white and natural birch. Watch the video to see this hanger in action.


If you find that the Ginan house appears to emerge from the surface of the earth, its because its made of earth: the facade is coated in a layer of gravel. Designed by Keitaro Muto Architects, this Japanese home is composed of two blocks of different size and shape. The blocks are separated on the outside by a small swimming pool, and connected on the inside by metal bridges. One block contains the bedrooms and the other houses the living and dining rooms. From the outside, the structure is mostly opaque, exuding a guarded feeling. On the interior, however, the home is open and airy. The outward sloping walls and high ceilings allow the home to feel much larger than it actually is. The built in furniture and monochromatic color scheme also contribute to lightness of the interior. The unique shape and material of Ginan House forces you to look twice. And there is nothing more pleasing than architecture that draws the viewer in, prompts questions, and leaves us with a lingering fascination. Photography by Apertozero.


22 year-old Josef Lang of Many Hands Design brings a Scandinavian edge to modern American industrial design. Inspired by functional, materiality and the fine arts, there is an overt emphasis on rendering quality, imaginative and appropriate responses to needs of modern design. CR stands for the cantilevered rod and 45 is the area code for calling Denmark. CR45 was initially conceived during Lang’s study abroad period in Denmark in 2013. The studio in which this piece was conceived, involved being split up by material, meaning each student was allowed only one specific material for the structure of their pieces. This exploration and understanding of materiality is obvious in the beautifully articulate execution of CR45. Structurally the biggest and most obvious exploration with this piece is that of cantilevering elements. Comprised of a high-carbon cold-rolled steel alloy space frame, the seat component is made with a sash cord, which has a nylon core and cotton exterior for both strength and comfort. Josef Lang is one to watch. Photography courtesy of Robert Bingaman.


French born designer and illustrator Thomas Danthony who is currently based in London, has designed N — a 42 page black & white book featuring a collection of graphite and ink drawings. Self-published, N is available in two versions, one of which is a luxury book with a hand made cover. The project was an experimentation by Danthony, differing from his commercial work, which allowed him the freedom to create a simple aesthetic. He explains: My goal was to take a bit of time off the computer to create something by hand, I was looking for a way to keep my commercial style, which is digital and to translate it on paper. To make it possible, it had to be simple, so I only worked with a pencil, a brush and some black ink. I then decided to design a small book to collect the series. I really enjoy the strong and simple compositions throughout. From the concept of the book, to the illustrations themselves, this is a superbly executed self-initiated project. There’s also a short video about N, which is directed by Tom van Schelven.


London based fashion label 1205 was founded in 2011 by designer Paula Gerbase. She combines her training at Central Saint Martins College — famous for its unconventional approaches towards fashion — and 5 years of experience as a head of design on London’s Savile Row — well known for its history of bespoke tailoring. All those influences can be easily detected in her razor sharp design, focusing on timeless and utilitarian clothing. While the concept of her contemporary design is crystal clear, she hints at the unpretentious habits of a craftsman in her choice of brand name: I wanted it to be about the clothes, not my name in lights. 1205 is just the day I was born, but more importantly, it’s four numbers that you can read in any language — you’re not wearing a person’s name on your back. I love the unisex touch of 1205’s current collection, evoked by a mix of sporty elements and classic but simple silhouettes, which represent the traditional craftsmanship so distinctive in Paula Gerbase’s work. She finds the perfect balance between masculinity and femininity. For both womenswear and menswear.


The Other Guy Next Door, the debut collection of the young New York based menswear label Cilantro + Ginger, presents well-tailored clothes in fine fabrics and unique, monochromatic prints, infused with Chinese born designer Zhang Qingyun’s approach of simplicity, attention to detail, and a dry sense of humor. The Fall 2014 collection interprets the closet of an unfamiliar neighbor. He has perhaps four shirts in his wardrobe – clean, but rarely ironed. Every now and then you encounter him outside the corner store. He holds a plastic Thank You bag. He wears white, head-to-toe. You never say hello. The core concept of the brand is to capture the continuity of imperfect, everyday minutiae, seeking beauty in the mundane and searching out quality in profusion. This is reflected in the entirety of the label’s visual output, from Jiao Xiang’s pared down styling of the lookbook to a Tumblr feed filled with monochromes and softly-toned palettes. One of my favorite aspects of the brand is the artist collaboration launched alongside each collection, serving as the backbone of the brand’s artistic expression. Kicking off with photographer Ross Mantle and his A Map With Open Space series, the imagery complements the collection pieces as displayed in C+G’s...


It is difficult to fuse the concepts of luxe and youth into a collection, but I believe Christophe Lemaire had successfully done so for Hermès Autumn Winter 2014. The designer rethought the concept of “youth” and its association with streetswear. Here, he took us to a direction of a mature young woman — graceful and feminine. The appearances of materials such as silk, fur, and leather amplifies the richness of the deep earth color palette; however, it’s the tailoring and cuts that redirected the show toward a younger audience. Pieces like the seamlessly monolithic coats contrast the inner garments’ flow of draperies. Minimally, the collarless shirts gives off an Eastern Asian influence that Lemaire has always had — now a signature trademark. Buttonless, pocketless, and almost non-utilitarian, majority of the looks acts as an experimental ground for the harmony of the “young” and the “old,” complemented with small bags and thin belts. Overall, the production was dark, but not sinister; simple, yet not boring. It stirred away from the “cool” trend, only to turned itself to a new identity that ladies can grasp onto. Photo Courtesy of Style.com


Love House has been built by architect Takeshi Hosaka in Yokohama Kanagawa, Japan. The space is quite small, only 38 square meters, just enough for two people. Even though the house is relatively new, there are signs of wear in objects and textures. This combination of old and new makes the building grounded in time, gives it depth and creates a tangible relationship between the house, its inhabitants and nature. Takeshi Hosaka offers a poetic description of this work: I draw the biggest curve on there with width and depth of a building, I distributed a place of a roof and a place of a sky with the curve. And I planned the stairs which went up from the first floor to the second floor with this curve. The main space of the building which these created, it is with the space that it is not inside, and is not the outside. Quiet rain, intense rain, rain with wind… rain creates various sounds. Light of the sun and moonlight play in the Love House, and rain and wind visit Love House, and birds and insects visit a tree and a fruit tree of Love House. We can know that all nature given on...


The straightforward Holiday House Vindö  is located on a rocky hillside on Vindö island in the Stockholm archipelago, Sweden. The idyllic setting of pine trees, blueberry bushes, and exposed granite posed a challenge for architect Max Holst. How could one place a home here without leveling the site and destroying the beautiful landscape? Holst responded to the site’s unique condition with a one-story structure that hovers just above ground level. The home is accessed through a series of wood stairs and planks nestled in the hillside. A large, sheltered terrace is located on the eastern end of the structure. The terrace leads to an open living and dining room. The bedrooms are located on the opposite half on the home, separated from the public areas by a hallway that doubles as the child’s playroom. The materials chosen for this home are rooted in Swedish tradition. Painted local timber defines the entirety of the facade, while the interior uses natural timber for a light and airy aesthetic. This design is exactly what I expect from a well crafted holiday home. Lovely setting, minimal intervention, only the necessities. Photography by Hannes Söderlund.


Nameless Architecture’s Concrete Church in Seoul, South Korea is a monolithic dance of concrete forms. The exposed and beautifully articulate concrete create architectural forms that intersect and envelop one another to bring the volumes together. Based on New York and Seoul, Nameless Architecture collaborated with local architecture JSpace firm, to create the structure that covers just over 3,000sqm. Intended to embody religious values, the series of spaces, much akin to many temples and spiritual spaces, have an open-body stillness to them. The materiality and adhesion to a minimalist palette helps aid this uncluttered nature. Formally, the analogy of the cross was utilized as a launching pad for the design and layout. The cross as a religious symbol substitutes for an enormous bell tower and is integrated with the physical property of the building whereby the minimized symbol implies the internal tension of the space. Nameless Architecture has really embodied their simple and stripped back formality through a reflective spiritual space. The use of simple volumes and a single material adapted to the site only helps reinforce this. The use and celebration of concrete as a material and structural element is the icing to these spaces. Photography courtesy of Rohspace and...


Sarah Van Peteghem — @sarah_cocolapine — is a Belgian born and Berlin based interaction designer and interior stylist at Fantastic Frank. Alongside this, she runs the blog Coco Lapine Design, which also features a small online store of elegant accessories & prints. Today we take a closer look into Sarah’s everyday life through her beautiful Instagram collection and how it has evolved. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? I like to try out many different things inside my home. When something turns out pretty, I take a picture of it and publish it. And this sometimes works the other way around as well: I think about what would look nice on a picture and end up arranging my home in that way. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? I like to surround myself with objects, which I find functional and well designed, but most importantly, I’m the most creative when everything around me is organised. It’s a good motivation to clean the house. When and how do you decide to take a photo? When I find something pretty or interesting. It actually made me look at things differently: when you think about pictures and making photo’s...