Minimalissimo


London based design duo BARBARA ALAN highly values research and experimentation in their approach towards design. Their aim is to reduce every piece to its very essentials, while still paying close attention to detail. For Spring / Summer 2015 it is all about juxtaposing lengths, new structures and floating silhouettes. While shapes are cut in geometric patterns, the free flowing, sometimes transparent fabrics add a soft touch to the summery layering. It is a pleasure to dive into the modernist world of BARBARA ALAN designs, where sculptural cutlines and a laid-back attitude are no contradiction. My favorite detail is the clean and pure stitch-free hemline finish, made possible by a high-tech bonding technique. All in all, a perfect collection to build a long-lasting, pure and modern wardrobe upon.


Sara Medina Lind — @saramedinalind — is a half Swedish, half Canarian freelance art director and photographer currently living in Vasastan, Stockholm. In between working on visual identities, product photography and shooting interiors for magazines, Sara has put together a remarkably beautiful photo collection of her home where any minimalism enthusiast would dream of living. We caught up with Sara to get to know a little more about the photographer behind the lens. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? I often get inspired by sunlight, architecture, materials, shapes and feelings. A tiny detail can be inspiring too. I like to focus on one thing at a time, to keep it simple and clean. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? I always feel a bit more creative when traveling to new places. To meet talented people also brings my creativity forward. Calm places often inspire me the most, places where stress doesn’t exist. When and how do you decide to take a photo? When I feel inspired and have an idea I quickly grab my camera! Sweden is a very dark country so this time of year when the light starts to show I feel more creative...


Hemsley London is a young English fashion brand that specializes in leather goods founded by Jayne Hemsley. Graduated from London College of fashion and previously worked under Roland Mouret and Sophie Hulme, the designer used her knowledge to create cutting-edge designs that celebrate luxury and contemporary interest. The recent launch of Spring Summer 2015 collection is a series of leather bags and clutches that holds a minimalist sensibility, with a sole focus on refined Italian calf skin and suede. Rather architectural in terms of construction while looking like artworks of artisanal craftsmanship, these accessories don’t act as products of only everyday practicality, but also modernity in the technological age. I find myself attracted to the CO1 Backpack due to its flexibility both as a backpack and a shoulder bag. The simple handles against the trapezoidal massing are crisply contoured to imply a notion of pure functionality, voided of any ornamentations. One day in the future, I’m sure to see this beauty in my closet.


Located in Texugueira, a village in the north of Leiria, Portugal, this house is a 233 square-metre minimalist residence designed by portuguese studio Contaminar Arquitectos. Texugueira House is made up of three volumes of different shapes and sizes, with narrow terraces slotted in between. It features a retaining wall that extends north to south along the eastern boundary of the site. A corridor follows this wall and forms the house’s main axis. The three blocks all sit in front of this corridor. The first volume is empty at the ground level, providing a covered area for leisure or parking. A studio is located at the upper level, with a small terrace that opens over the landscape, allowing natural light to enter the space. The central volume features the main entrance and the social area including the living room, with a large window over the green surroundings, and the kitchen connecting with the garden. The third volume contains a more secluded and private area, with two bedrooms on the ground floor, which are directly connected with the contiguous garden spaces, and with a balcony suite on the upper floor. This is a remarkable house that includes beautiful details throughout, particularly the use of cork — the typical...


Index Ventures is a creative capital venture company based in San Francisco. When the office needed a major expansion, Garcia Tamjidi Architecture Design stepped in with a straightforward design focused on natural light. Incorporating natural light into the workplace is a desire for any creative team, however most office designs allow for very few windows. Garcia Tamjidi solved this problem by introducing new skylights in key areas of the office. The entry, cafe, and boardroom are located in the center of the office and designed to make the most out of the sunlight. The rest of the office seamlessly flows from the entrance, with large sheets of glass and gray walls forming barriers as needed. Exposed brick walls and wood beams add a touch of charm from the original structure. The furnishings are simple, functional, and white. A gorgeous sculpture hangs from one of the skylights, bringing a bit of the surreal into the office. Index Ventures is certainly not your typical workspace: it is a space for true inspiration and collaboration. Photography by Joe Fletcher.


Josh Goot’s AW 2015 Collection is a synchronized follow on from his minimalist aesthetic. The collection is mused by his trademark clean, crisp lines, bold color blocking and overall accessibility. There is a timelessness that he exudes through his work, through his pieces that make them classic, fused with edgy tailoring. This collection is the epitome of this, playing with texture, tailored shapes, cutouts and silhouettes. Based in Sydney, with boutiques in both Melbourne and Sydney, Goot is known for this contemporary fresh aesthetic, minimal palette and as someone who is pushing boundaries with shapes, in subtle ways. Heavily influenced by his upbringing surrounded by film, music and fashion, his work as a designer became his way to talk to people. He has won numerous awards, nationally and internationally and is growing in exposure as a result. His work is on the rise, and rightly so. Photography courtesy of Josh Goot.


Simple and straightforward projects are the solution for crowded work environments, such as the usual chaotic and busy beauty parlour. Japanese architect Hiroyuki Miyake took on the challenge to design TROOVE — a space fit for one lone stylist to take care of his salon, with all the benefits a minimalist space can bring to the daily hustle and effortless style for the clientèle to enjoy. Building upon a concrete structure, Miyake makes good use of Japanese oak to endow the salon and map out each space to its function. The charming reception and waiting room; the main styling room and the shampoo booth; each one cleverly distinct from one another. Kudos to the beautiful folding screen made in galvanized iron, inserting lightness into a big visual feature. Since the 2011 earthquake, several power saving policies were put into practice, directly altering the daily life and perception of darkness and how much it is necessary to live by. The archetypal Japanese paper lamps plays a remarkable role as the gatekeepers of this charming salon. The shadow play and well defined light project spread throughout is symbolic of smart adaptation to a new reality and, remarkably, a nod to the past.


Swedish independent label MLTV has launched its Spring Summer 2015 menswear collection exhibiting sensual pieces with revealing cutouts, architectural lines and contrasting fabrics. MLTV’s founder Anna Sjunnesson expresses a curious androgyny in this collection which is what she describes as a progressive minimalism. The collection called Episode Six consists of lightweight items, inspired by architecture and geometry while combining soft, light flowing fabrics. With the use of fabrics of different thickness and weave density, Anna has created architectural cutouts which highlight and interact with the body in different ways. In some shots of the campaign, gender lines appear deliberately blurred in the look and feel. With these contradicting themes that drive the design for this season, the result is a relaxed and casual collection beyond traditional menswear. Photography courtesy of Anna Sjunnesson.


Currently based in New York, Ward Roberts is an Australian conceptual artist whose compelling and mysterious photographs draw on themes such as loneliness and isolation in the modern world. His perspective is contemporary and sophisticated, creating images that are full of emptiness and incredibly poignant. There is an innate energy at the core of his work that makes his compositions seem painterly and borne out of academic calculated patience. Despite the studied balance of his work, his preferred medium is analogue — I love how the grain massages the tone, the range of color, contrast, and organic qualities. Digital is for perfection. And you know, the world is not perfect and neither are the people in it.


Little Bishop is a clever, minimalist, ceiling hook specifically designed for cable hung pendant lights. Little Bishop, shaped and cast by hand, wears a lighting cable like a “cloak”. Smooth curved flowing channels in the hook guide the cable, locking itself down. The cable is a feature of the hook, eliminating the need of any knots or clamps. Little Bishop is available in three different post heights. Little Bishop is designed with eye for detail. The hook is unique in form and function. The hook is not a feature. Hanging seamless from the ceiling it just feels like it is part of the home. It is present but not overwhelming. The designer behind Little Bishop is Melbourne based Antony Richards from Hunter & Richards. Little Bishop was recently successfully funded on Kickstarter.


Poster is an interesting new project developed by the Japanese studio YOY. It is a series of minimalistic wall lamps that appear as a basic A2-sized poster — a great example of simple and smart design with few elements and an abundance of creativity. The shape of the lamp shade is created in the middle of a sheet of paper with several cuts, to fix to a wall with tape or pins like a poster. The lamp also features a small LED light that is hidden beneath the paper. The final result is quite incredible, whether on white or black, and the ability to print various colours and patterns can onto the surface is an added bonus.


The small and secluded Bolton Residence is located in Eastern Quebec. Designed by the Canadian based firm Naturehumaine, this elegant home focuses on nature and simplicity. The structural form takes its shape from the traditional barns in the region, yet this vernacular is interpreted in a distinctly modern way. Two large rectangles, positioned one on top of the other, form the structure of the home. The top rectangle cantilevers slightly out from the lower, allowing the house to feel as if it is floating along the mountainside. A dark exterior distinguishes the structure from its often snowy landscape. On the interior, long and narrow windows wrap the living room, flooding the home with stunning views of its mountainous setting. The fireplace is uniquely positioned in a media cabinet, which also provides storage. Accents of wood and black create a dynamic interior, bringing depth and light to the small space. This color scheme continues in the bedroom and in the dark tile of the bathroom. Bolton Residence may be small, but it is not short on style. Photography by Adrien Williams and David Dworkind.