Minimalissimo


The magnet stripe bar is created by Seiji Oguri and Yohei Oki, founders of id inc. The minimalist bar, part of the Magnet collection by id inc., is a holder for the alternately hidden magnets. Firstly for the magnets, secondly — when a magnet is pulled out — for paper notes or photos. Each magnet can be pulled out and placed in a preferred place. When a magnet is pulled out the space changes colour creating a nice graphic effect. Even when not in use the bar can be a nice decorative element in your space. The magnet stripe bar is made in a white-red and a white-grey edition. The white-grey is more neutral and will fit best with a wide range of interiors.


Global L is a new wall absorbents collection designed by the Swedish designers Johan Kauppi & Bertil Harström for the company Glimakra of Sweden. In this collaboration the company wanted something genuine from its own area to offer the global customers, so the inspiration was found in the traditional Swedish old façades and roofs of wood. The result is two patterns gathered under the name “L” as in Local, available in two groups by size — long panels and short panels, which can be used freely for creation of unique walls. They have a load-bearing frame in MDF, a sound-absorbing padding of polyurethane foam and upholstery in a wide offer of fabrics, making all manufacturing and production at Glimakra of Sweden with great craftsmanship.


VOWEL‘s new Octa collection is one that interweaves found materials, whereby a new value becomes redefined. VOWEL is a collaborative effort of duo Beau Bertens and Eline Ceelen where their design philosophy is based on creating an archive of projects that balance on the border between art and design. Based in the Netherlands, their work is founded on archaeological, scientific and philosophical discoveries, together with reimagining their next lives. Octa is primarily a jewelry collection, which an overt emphasis on neck adornment. The series sees the repurposing of existing used materials, and thus infuse a new meaning to their function, through form expression. The palette is minimal and the resulting forms are streamlined and beautiful. This is a limited collection, and is available through their site. Photography courtesy of Benjamin van Witsen.


Founded in 2008 by Ben Gorham, Byredo is a Stockholm based fragrance house, that features a wide range of products for men and women, including perfume, body care, home fragrances and accessories. With a distinct focus on craftsmanship and quality, it is particularly Byredo’s beautiful and understated packaging design that leaves a lasting impression on me. The art direction, identity and packaging was conceived by Swedish designer Moses Voigt of Acne Art Department. The project included a customised identity typeface for labels — creating an image of heritage; characters based on modernist principles and the characteristics of 1900’s gothics. Modern yet timeless through its simple elegance. From the simple typography to the minimalistic labelling, I’m certainly sold and will soon be picking out a cologne to sample.


With her LA based eponymous fashion label, designer Shaina Mote sets a new standard in integrating a regenerative quality and versatility to a strong and distinct style. The new and exciting way she creates minimalist silhouettes with multi purpose details might be a result of her very personal approach towards fashion: I work quite intuitively and I think that for me personally the lack of formal training has allowed me to feel free to experiment to reach a conclusion with each piece. — Need Supply introduction I love the way Shaina Mote adds a hint of playfulness to her staple design. Over time, it lets you discover new ways to wear your favorite garments. It makes every piece even more combinable, while at the same time lifting it above other generic wardrobe basics.


Located at the heart of an apple orchard, in the region of South Tyrolean Dolomites near Bolzano, stands a curious and eye-catching mirror structure. Celebrated architect, Peter Pichler blurs the lines between a relevant contemporary construction on the countryside and art installation. A valiant move for a region known for rejoicing long-standing traditions. The premise of the project is a Vacation Home, taking into account the surrounding area and the upmost comfort and privacy for the guests. The front of the house showcases an honest modernist façade, with clean geometric lines. The interior design follows the cue with a strong white color dominance, with the occasional raw wood on walls and furniture. It’s worth mentioning the house boasts a floating illusion above the ground thanks to well-placed foundations — the light-project for the night time is exquisite, taking the striking mirror walls a step further. It may not be an explicit intention, however I find the gorgeous Mirror Houses to be a crossbreed of flawless architecture and a site-specific that would fit art magazines effortlessly.


It’s barely 2015 and Valentino, under the creative direction of Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Picciolo, presented their Spring 2015 Haute Couture collection in New York early this December. The garments were showered in a minimal color of white as an homage to the founder Valentino Garavani’s all-white collection in 1968. There was a new introduction for the Valentino aesthetic with which we, as fashion enthusiasts, are familiar for the past seasons—minimalism. I almost mistook the collection for Calvin Klein if it were not for the flows of laces that have become a signature for this Italian fashion house. There were no complications in the direction of the designs; the focus was on the constructions, solidity, and collectivity. The show progressed from off-white silhouettes in ivory or light grey, to end with a pure white strapless gown that demands attention of the viewers to its subtle patterns. Materials varied from cashmere to silk, creating a sense of luxe that relies on modesty rather than extravagance—the true essence of minimalism. Perhaps, for me, the highlight was the high collar in some of the dresses. The elongated effect that it has on the models’ necks gave an elegance to the walks,...


Located in Valencia province, Spain, lies House in Ontinyent — a private residence designed by Borja García, a local architecture studio. It is connected to the recently renovated original headquarters of Gandía Blasco, an outdoor furniture and textile factory. The house is an extension of the building and reflects the same values and aesthetics, externally and internally, with the use of white and neutral colours ensuring that the house conforms to the company’s contemporary design principles — simplicity and refinement. Borja García explains: The core of the project is a large open space on the ground floor and a sculptural staircase made of concrete that guide visitors to the upper floors. The materials, with an absolute use of white, are always naked and honest. The basement, a large sheltered space between concrete walls, connects the house with the pool. The pool, built in white concrete also represents a large water plane floating with the rest of the field. I appreciate the choice of the owner, José Antonio Gandía Blasco to link his work and his life in a unique concept — a sort of landmark for a small town. Photography Courtesy of Borja García Studio.


The Minimalissimo team would like to wish you all happy holidays and a very Merry Christmas. We appreciate all of our new and longstanding readers and we hope to continue featuring beautiful minimalist designs every single day of the coming year. It’s going to be an interesting one, with many exciting announcements. All the best! — Adele, Bronwyn, Carl, Gian Marco, Jana, Jillian, Jorge, Marina, Mateus, Melle, Nhat & Niels-Peter. This year’s little festive feature is courtesy of Joyce Croonen and her handmade ombre Christmas ornaments. If you’re still feeling creative, here’s how to make them: 1. Buy white ornaments or get some old ones in any light colour you happen to have lying around somewhere. 2. Hang the ornaments outside on a piece of rope so you can easily paint them. 3. Spray paint the old ornaments completely white (if you’ve bought white ones, skip this step). 4. Once they are dry, spray paint your way up with black paint. 5. Take your time: spray paint at the bottom and try to get the ombre effect by slowly enlarging the distance between the ornaments and the paint.


Fran Corvi’s suitably names Corvi Wine Cooler takes cool to another level. Made from concrete, and moulded in a geometric form-mould, the result is one to match the most deserving of palettes. Each cooler can be stacked in an infinite array of designs to create a personalized wine cellar, and therefore pushes the boundaries of the expected formwork of the utilitarian object. Based on Argentina, Corvi’s inspiration is deriven from this background, where the wine cooler is a piece of me, my roots and my life where it also stands as a status symbol. His material choice seems to match said intent of stature. The geometric form of the Wine Cooler is said to comprise a series of sharp planes that offer a refined interpretation of the facets of a gem which also functionally double as the connecting platform element also. Photography courtesy of and available through Intoconcrete.


British brand, Alfie Douglas is a family of creatives, who design and make simple, minimalistic, handmade goods in England. I came across their collection of incredibly beautiful leather bags and accessories earlier this year, but it was a recent preview of their 2015 collection that got me rather excited to share their work. With clean-cut lines and simple colour design, Alfie Douglas create everything from oversized totes, backpacks and duffle bags to small pouches and tool-kit covers. Their structured backpacks being a particular favourite of mine. Our products are original. They are simple visually and in the way that they are made. Ingenious in the way that they can be adapted and customised in their function. Each one is different, singular, made by hand to be reliable and sustainable. Luxurious and timeless, a.d’s bags are made from a very small range of components which are common to all of their products — made to high specifications to last a lifetime.


Masahiko Maruyama who is behind the Japanese label Nude:MM created a delectable menswear Fall Winter 2014 collection. It is a monochromatic collection where architectural influences convolute trendy proportions of sportswear and smart casual in a mix of wool, linen twill and nylon. Exploring with layers and details of hoods, vests, lapels and belts, Maruyama presents a strong story of minimalist appeal and the familiar comfort of well-tailored menswear in his designs. Structured pliable piping at the coat hoods and adjustable slide-buckle cinch belts are some of the details that stand out in this collection made entire in Japan. This is too beautiful a collection to skip even though I discovered this late in the year. Photography by Masaru Tanaka.