Minimalissimo


Trava is a lightweight, three season, single pole tent by Boreas Gear that is unlike any other tent you have seen. Boreas’ designers were inspired by the bridges of the Spanish neo-futuristic architect Santiago Calatrava. The striated supports of Calatrava’s bridges work both as function and aesthetic. Like the bridges, the packs by Boreas Gear use a reinforced ribcage patterning and the design team’s aim was to combine both ideas in the structure of the tent. I really like the clean lines of Calatrava’s work and how the team of Boreas applied a similar style in the design of their first tent. The two person tent really stands out from others with its bright white colour. The completely white fly and the full grayscale canopy and pole system really go well together. The rain fly has a window and offers a clear view to the surrounding nature. A separate footprint that provides full ground cover can add an extra element of protection under the vestibule space. Boreas Gear is a small independent outdoor gear company based in San Fransisco. The small collaborative has clear vision for the future of outdoor equipment. They see an opportunity for better products, designed from the ground up,...


Located in a relaxed area in rural Shiga, Japan, the Japanese studio FORM/Kouichi Kimura architects has developed this beautifully structured family residence; Courtyard House. We invited the architects to tell us a little more about the project: Designed to form a U-shaped building with a courtyard, which secures privacy, the house was requested to incorporate with the scenery while making the best use of the spacious site of about 330 square metres. The interior is configured by a single open room whereby finishes and levels vary to make each space independent and comfortable, creating various scenes as one moves from one place to another. The construction has many remarkable aspects to it, such as its pale grey corrugated metal façade giving the house an industrial aesthetic. As well as the linear water channel through the courtyard directing the eye towards the landscape, and the concrete elements throughout the interior, which all add value to this magnificent, minimalist home.


Rob Kennon Architects designed this lovely family home located in a suburb of Melbourne, Australia. Burnley House is a perfect example of beautiful and liveable modern design. The home is divided into private and public areas, distinguished by a clever use of materials. The public areas of are filled with airy materials and a plethora of natural light, while the private rooms are smaller, darker, and cozy. The large and open great room features tall ceilings and a stretch of white cabinetry. Long, sleek windows occupy a position on every wall and wood floors bring a pleasant texture into the room. In the bedrooms, the walls are clad in a deep brown wood and the floors are covered with soft rugs. The mix of materials in Burnley House is flawless. Concrete, wood, black-framed windows, and smooth white surfaces are incorporated throughout the home, creating visual interest and continuity of design. I love how the furnishings completely compliment the surfaces and textures of the structure. Every piece of Burnley House is seamlessly pulled together, creating a structure any family would be lucky to call home.


Xirel Segard’s Galalux Lamp is a floating sphere of concrete lux and a creative approach to illumination. Made from concrete and available in two varying sizes, the magical orb of light is both a sculptural and functional addition to space. The thin sliver of exposed light that seeps from the center of the sphere acts as the functional injection into an otherwise geometric form. Although it seems to levitate with this streak of light passing through it, the materiality itself helps ground the object to the space. Based in Paris, Segard has been involved in numerous exhibitions and the recipient of many awards. Weighing in around 3kgs, the Galalux is one of many of her experimentations with concrete. Her work is articulated form-wise with a somewhat lightness, somehow due to the aeration of the concrete itself, but there also exists this a duality and juxtaposition, through the material’s strength. This experimentation and playfulness has given birth to this beautiful piece of industrial design that subtly illuminates and just as subtly adds a sense of curiosity. Photography courtesy of Xirel Segard.


Unusual geometry and minimalism makes for an incredible pair, especially when applied to renovation projects and updating old structures to contemporary standards. Taking over an existing post-and-beam building, maintaining all the best elements to its advantage and adapting the inner workings to the owners’ lifestyle are Patrick Tighe Architecture’s triumphs for this Malibu based residence. The ceiling makes its presence quite obvious throughout the house, as it shapes itself as a main feature; for this reason, the visual dynamic is built around the roof’s geometry. The windows and furniture work their way around it, with unconcealed adaptations in the bedrooms, living rooms and even bathrooms. This residence remixes a timeworn architectonic element that is often hidden or modified to achieve uniformity, and breathes new life with eclectic variations. The owner’s art and design collection is tastefully incorporated into the daily life; as display niches, special lighting and white canvas spaces make room for each piece to shine. The end result is a very dynamic and vibrant residence, with sharp angles and various textures in all rooms. The grand entry door says it all, its uneven shape introduces the concept in a glance. Minimalism can flirt with eccentricity from time to...


Architecture infused with natural form: That is how Los Angeles based designer Zaid Affas describes the Spring/Summer 2015 collection of his eponymous label. Luxurious fabrics from the mills of Japan, Europe and Great Britain come in clear but warm colors, such as off white, cream and dark sand, matched with austere silhouettes in black and distressed silver. I’m very much taken by the decisive message of the Zaid Affas’ work, which is perfectly conveyed by the very sunny yet austere imagery of the current collection. The architectural silhouettes are presented by the models like sculptures from an ancient culture, while heat and weathering seem to refine the surface of the fabrics in a unique way. It’s a perfect balance between ease and severity.


Copenhagen-based graphic design studio 2Y recently introduced their conceptual visual identity for a modern boutique bakery, brød. It is to be located in Copenhagen, where the craftsmanship of breadmaking relives its splendour while the ever-growing popularity of bake-shops raises the bar for upscale bakeries. The creative minds behind 2Y studio, Olga Loy and Emil Galazka, explain: The word “brød” itself with its straightforward meaning in harmony with the no-nonsense typography of the logo implies the simple approach taken by the bakery. The core values are in the spotlight, while any unnecessary elements distracting attention from the baking itself are removed. The clean and sharp lines of the logo leave a lasting impression. Y2 studio have managed to make something look simple, effortless and beautiful, which is one of the most challenging aspects of creative endeavours. Although we seldom celebrate concepts like this on Minimalissimo, this project deserves recognition because it is not only understandable, it is as little design as possible.


Investing in a versatile white shirt can be an easy way for a woman to look great. A wardrobe staple. However simple a white shirt may seem, it is one of the most challenging designs to perfect. When introduced to in-grid, a British fashion brand, I was struck by the description: We make white shirts. For women. Made in England. The standard white collared shirts are converted into beautifully cut blouses, mostly without collars, to signify a femininity. The variations of these cotton pieces not only lie in the different cuts of short sleeves and long sleeves, but also in the details such as curved hems, hidden buttons, and quirky slits. Transformation of the minimalist white shirt has made the basic item more versatile and diverse. I especially enjoy the transparency overlays of some of the shirts; they give a sense of elegant provocation.


Flood installation by Alban Guého has been selected to participate in Paris in the next nuit blanche festival. The theme for this year is the climate echoing the COP 21 to be held in December 2015. A project with a minimalist look focusing on an essential matter for the planet. In recent years many extreme natural phenomena took place in the world with a frequency that is accelerating. The history of Paris has also experienced remarkable weather conditions including in 1910 with an exceptional flood that inundated much of the town and paralyzed public transport. This phenomenon of heavy precipitation remained, and over 100 years on should become more frequent due to the current climate change. Flood serves as a reminder of the fragility of our planet. This installation is composed of two overlying structures, placed opposite to one another on the floor and ceiling, connected by a series of PVC sections. A black liquid, either oil or paint, will be pumped through the PVC representing the slow and continuous degradation of natural elements and resources. A strong impression. A strong message. Support this beautiful project on Kickstarter.


La Piscina del Roccolo is a luxurious indoor swimming pool designed by Italian architecture firm act_romegialli. The concept for the project was to create a pool and bathing house that would capitalize on the view of the countryside. The result is a humble structure nestled in the hilly site. On the western end of the building is a long stretch of windows placed adjacent to the pool. The windows visually connect the pool to its landscape all year round. In the warmer months this wall slides open, creating an indoor/outdoor bathing experience. Much of the structure is housed underground so as to impede the landscape as little as possible. The locker rooms and fitness center are placed in this underground area, allowing the pool an interrupted view to the outside. White mosaic tiles mingle with oak accents and exposed concrete on the interior. This marriage of materials brings depth and dimension to an otherwise simple space. On the exterior, stone walls and plenty of plant life ensure the structure stays integrated with its environment. La Piscina del Roccolo is an ideal space for exercise, relaxation, and connecting with nature.


London-based Fourfoursixsix’s Villa Mörtnäs combines considered Scandinavian style together with abounding contextual deliberation. Designed over three levels, the minimal formality of this villa clearly helps define a lineation of spaces within. Each floor plays its own, almost completely differing, function from the next. Entering at ground level is support space, which is submerged into the landscape and acts as the private entrance to the house. Ascending upward, the first level then houses the areas for rest and sleep, with the remaining living spaces on the upper most level, all accessed through stairs. The intentional vistas throughout, the regular and purposed window locations, create selected key apertures revealing the view. The living areas have been placed at the top of the building in order to enhance sunlight. There is also a notable differentiated volume in height between the floors. The living spaces almost seem to be double in volume, compared to the other levels. The intention is to amplify the light accessibility into the spaces. Completed in 2014, the arrangement on site of the villa to be facing the sea helps create a connection to the landscape beyond. The materiality of concrete, glass, oak and a muted palette, creates a sense...


Start with the name based on a Walloon term meaning skylark, the agile and light bird, and you begin to unravel a bit more about Aloye, a Tokyo based fashion brand. Next, take a look at the utter simplicity from the showcased apparel, it’s not surprising to identify a penchant for straightforwardness from the collection. Lightness and minimalism goes hand in hand, after all. For the Spring / Summer 2015 collection, Aloye bets it all on color duality and precisely tailored pieces as the main attraction. Taking the ever reliable white and navy blue as the flagship combination, the brand plays and toys using slight variations of quintessential cuts for each garment, like school uniforms. From subtle textures on dresses to blatant monochromatic textiles on shirts, it’s a very precise exercise to make basic apparel attractive; and without resorting to gimmicks. The photo editorial sets the tone with a very charming and nautical feeling, interestingly enough; this wouldn’t feel out of place as a Resort collection from an established brand taking a break from excessiveness.