Minimalissimo


Located in Hanekita, Japan, the new double-family residence by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates is designed to have a playful attitude toward the distribution of lights and shadows, public and private, as well as interior and exterior. Katsutoshi Sasaki found his namesake architecture firm in 2008. With many notable projects published in numerous renowned publications and websites, surely, House in Hanekita will not be excluded. To accommodate programmatic necessities, the architect divided the second floor of the main loft to thirteen rooms superimposed by a 3×3 grid with spandrel walls, creating a flexible interconnected series of spaces that deal with private and public boundaries. Complemented with two indoor gardens (yes, on the second floor!), the main loft is separated from the other with a light well. On the  ground floor, which holds two kitchens and dining rooms, the two lofts share the same entrance and private gardens. The interior of this residence is covered with pale-colored woods, creating a lighter and spacious environment that further emphasizes the occasional pouring sunlight. Minimally, the clean cuts of every corner give off a sense of care from the designer. I especially love the simple additions of greens, harmonizing the interior wooden material with its...


Felipe Hess is a young architect based in Sao Paulo, Brazil. He create his own studio in 2012 with projects ranging from residential to commercial to interior design. He has been involved in many incredible projects, located in the city of Sao Paulo, all adopting minimalist design. One such project is Sergipe, a spacious and bright apartment located in a 1960 modernist building. The project involved the demolition of almost all the walls to unify the space. The private areas of the apartment, consisting of a double bedroom with bathroom, are separated by a large white wall. A rigorous and elegant apartment, simple and contemporary lines give way to the illusion in the main entrance set inside a cube building, completely covered with yellow tiles from floor to ceiling. To create a seamless tile surface, Hess decided not to include handle in the design. Instead, the door opens by entering a PIN on a keypad hidden behind one of the tiles. The cube entrance is covered with shelves from the outside, and it creates the illusion, once inside, exiting from a magic door through the library. Fantastic.


Daycare Sundries is a modern kindergarten located southwest of the town Babenhausen in Germany. Designing a school is always a challenge: the structure needs to hold a large percentage of children to adults while keeping everyone occupied and safe. As a result, stark utilitarian structures tend to dominate in the industry. Designed by Ecker Architekten, Daycare Sundries is the exception. On first approach the building gives the impression of a work of art rather than a kindergarten. With a closer look, however, smartly crafted details start to emerge. The structure is segmented into two wings, one for the older students and one for the younger. Four double-height classrooms house the older children on the north end of the site. Built in lockers and cubbies provide no-fuss storage in both halves of the school. The dining hall and gymnasium, used by students of all ages, are the centerpieces of the structure. Tall windows are prevalent on a majority of the exterior walls. The windows warm the school with natural light and views of the peaceful landscape. Pale brick covers other parts of the facade; the material is a nod to the medieval architecture in neighboring towns. Lawns and paved areas around the building provide space for...


Faye Toogood’s Spade Chair is a perfect accompaniment to any considered space. Her work is a celebration of the material itself, and the craftsmanship behind each piece is testament to this. Available in both the chair and a backless stool, this piece helps redefine how we use elements in our environments to enable our use of said environments. Toogood is a British designer, specializing in furniture design, with an emphasis on her furniture and objects, demonstrating a preoccupation with materiality and experimentation. The Spade Chair is evidence of this. The minimal detailing and seamless composition are to be admired. There is an honesty to the rawness and irregularity of the chosen material. Her background in fine arts, and involvement in the magazine industry has meant a pre-existing exposure to product design, differentiating her from other industrial designers. The Spade Chair and its expression of textured materiality is beautiful; considered and demanding of a worthy audience. Photography courtesy of Rory van Millingen.


Oscar Diaz is a London based design studio working in the field of product design. Plain and playful, their designs take inspiration from everyday objects, which by a simple twist become something unexpected and beautiful. Oscar Diaz did exactly this with the Loop bottle opener, designed for American brand, FIELD. Loop is a bottle opener comprised of stainless steel designed as a tool and simplified to its essence, finished in a satin electropolish, and will open bottles for as long as you’re drinking them. A minimal, but perfectly functional and robust bottle opener with a timeless design. Photography courtesy of FIELD.


In the latest campaign by MLTV Clothing, Episode Five carries the theme of architecture and asymmetry within the casual contemporary menswear. Anna Sjunnesson who is behind the label, isn’t making a statement of style but rather, expresses in her designs a quiet yet mildly recusant attitude: in a shirt that is draped subtly on one side, in asymmetric forms layered under heavier fabric, and in a sweatshirt hoodie constructed by 2 scarfs. As she describes: Layers of shear fabrics and heavier knits construct an industrial look which is built up with folded sections, draped parts and asymmetric cuttings. By working between the fine line of feminine and masculine and challenging the norms; we strive to develop new functions, expressions and use. In its very subtle details, I admire Anna’s eye for the inconspicuous and construction in this minimalist collection. Shop this Episode. Images courtesy of Anna Sjunnesson.


Urban Interventions gradually became the darling of art enthusiasts, especially when created by talented visual artists injecting a good deal of personality and politics into mundane spaces. The premise of altering the mood, or one might say, the dynamics of certain neighborhoods isn’t an easy feat to achieve. Urban interventions may come in various shapes and sizes though. In a bold move, XML Architects introduced at the center of Amsterdam’s Red Light District, the Hangover Information Center, a clear intrusion of alien visual concept, breaking away from burlesque and darker motifs. Bright white lights guide individuals to a pharmacy-like ambient offering a vitamin-infused drink, handed by employees behind a 9 meter long counter made with sheets of polycarbonate. The experience resembles a quick trip to your local pharmacy, if said pharmacy was reduced to great geometric design and two particular products. Stylish bottles of water and vitamin drinks make up an impressive blue wall as the central visual attraction. The main product is called RESET, promising a speedy recovery from a night of heavy drinking, thanks to its main ingredient, glutathione. This is a great example of a tasteful and functional urban intervention, all made with beautiful architecture and interior...


The Sa, currently being funded through Kickstarter, is an innovative, minimalist, geometric umbrella that reimagines structure, form, and aesthetics, with improved efficiency. I love the modern appearance of the canopy design. Like origami the Sa uses planar tension to generate its form. The inner and outer canopies, made of highly recyclable waterproof plastic, expand and contract in unison to open and close the umbrella. As a result the Sa is lighter than a traditional umbrella since there is no need for an inner, metal, skeleton. The canopy design is great, but also have a look at the internalized mechanism to open and close the umbrella. One simply needs to rotate the bottom of the handle to open the Sa. The spring-loaded mechanism will open the umbrella. To close just pull on the handle. Magnets are embedded along the perimeter of the panels allowing an effortless tight closure of the umbrella after use. Since the umbrella finds its roots in origami the creators Justin Nagelberg and Matthew Waldman created the name “Sa” from a combination of Japanese words: “kasa”(umbrella), “same” (rain) and “sasu” (the verb used to describe holding an umbrella). The Sa is offered in cyan, yellow, magenta, black, grey and...


Fusionner 3.0: Air House is a new installation developed by the Japanese designer Kotaro Horiuchi — embedded into the gallery of Aichi Shukutoku University. The installation inserts visitors into a house of air, using paper as an architectural material. The white layers are suspended from the ceiling throughout the space as a repetition of the silhouette of a house, progressively changing its size and form, until you reach a small window. Horiuchi explains: When you went inside by making your body smaller, you could slowly notice a silhouette of a house, which seemed to change its size continuously. You were able to experience the air spreading in it and discover models hidden between the papers. You could gather, discuss, enjoy the moment and even lie down for a different perspective.


House in Possanco is a contemporary home featuring a captivating array of architectural gestures. Designed by the prominent Portuguese firm ARX, this weekend home is located in the arid landscape of Possanco, Portugal. The structure is defined by a pure white facade with strategic carvings, which create windows and skylights. The pristine sheets of white are expertly constructed, allowing the entire building to exude the air of designed precision. Four patios cut through the bold form and are situated throughout the home. A triangular cantilever juts from the side of the building. It is an exciting piece, and it plays with the viewer’s sense of scale and structure. The interior is void of decoration. Instead, long and uniquely formed shadows are splashed along the walls like artwork. The highly geometric roof adds visual interest to any of the home’s interior rooms. The many windows and openings ensure plenty of natural light and views of the exterior landscape. The abstract nature of House in Possanco pushes the viewer to explore further. This is not a structure that can be admired casually: it requires one’s keen attention and an appreciation for the modern and spectacular. Photography by Fernando Guerra FG+SG.


The OLED Desk Lamp is one of sleek formal function. Its lines are clean and minimal while illuminating the work surface seamlessly. Long gone are the days of an obtrusive lighting element, taking over the desk and its surface. As we become more remote and agile in our working styles and approach, this lamp beautifully emanates this philosophy. It supports this functionality, instead of being loud. The piece itself is made from brushed stainless steel, and its components are all carefully considerate and intentional. Designed by Russian-based Olga Kalungina, who has a background in Art History and Industrial Design, this piece is purposefully quiet. I like this. Photography courtesy of Olka Design.


We love our minimalistic storage solutions and when Thing Industries, a newly established creative studio, recently introduced the Indoor Stoop, it became a must-feature. Indoor Stoop is a high-functioning stoop for seating and storage. Featuring three soft-close drawers with peg board surfaces, the design works well in bedroom or living room corners for storage of clothes, books, or other household accessories. It could even be used as an extra seat or step-ladder. I like that. Measuring 19 inches wide x 24 inches high and 24 inches deep, the Indoor Stoop is not only a well designed, highly functional piece of furniture, it has a striking and sleek aesthetic.