Minimalissimo


A courtyard house located in a rural landscape near Guadalajara City, Mexico — Pino Street House is built for a small family with a lot of friends. A clean white façade is defined by bright yellow paintwork used to feature railings, guttering and doorways of this 165-square-metre house made up of a series of stacked white blocks, with glazed living spaces facing the brick patio. Architect Oscar Gutiérrez explains: The house is divided by a courtyard designed to create parallel paths between social and family life, while also creating a feeling of amplitude. The ground floor is characterized by platforms that rotate around the yard and have different uses and atmospheres. The upper level features three blocks that open onto the landscape: two rooms are articulated by a corridor and staircase, a terrace and balcony that establishes a relationship between the garden and courtyard, in conjunction create a linear sequence of open spaces. With my love of the countryside and the color yellow, this beautifully minimalistic building has quickly captured my attention to the light and touch of traditional elements. Photography by Vanessa Guízar.


Casa Brunhais is an elegant white home located in Póvoa de Lanhoso, a municipality in Portugal. The home was completed in 2009 by architect Rui Vieira Oliveira with Vasco Manuel Fernandes. When viewed from afar, Casa Brunhais is a simple white form against a rocky landscape and blue sky. On closer inspection, this house is brimming with impeccable details in a dynamic structure. Multiple forms comprise the structure of Casa Brunhais. Shape, height, and material subtly differentiate the intersecting volumes. A traditional courtyard is placed at the center of the form, creating a private outdoor space for the residents. Few windows are placed on the exterior facade, as the interior courtyard brings plenty of natural light indoors. The interior features large expanses of white walls and floors, along with neutral curtains on the many large windows. Built-in furniture and recessed lighting allows Casa Brunhais to be as minimal on the interior as it is on the exterior. I find this house absolutely captivating: the design is strong yet still exudes a sense of humility. Photography by Fernando Guerra FG + SG.


Poetic Lab’s Shadow Clock is an opposing composition of contractions. Subtle in size, when illuminated and in use, it transforms into a bold installation element. The Shadow Clock indicates the changing of time, through the use of light and reflection and refraction on the environmental issues to which it is installed; namely the wall. The pre-existing lighting therefore also plays a role in this expression of its function. London-based studio Poetic Lab, headed by Hanhsi Chen and Shikai Tseng, the collaboration has seen the joining of design philosophies, whereby the central spine of their design is that of poetry of objects and materials. Initially designed in 2012, this piece is 520mm high and 400mm in depth from the fixed surface, the Shadow Clock is made from Aluminium Alloy and stainless steel. Its interaction and dependency on its environment is particularly engaging. While the nod to the traditional sundial clock is obvious, this interpretation is very much welcomed. Photography courtesy of Poetic Lab.


Adi Adireg — @ad_i_ — is a fashion design student, currently working on his thesis collection at Srinakharinwirot University Bangkok, Thailand. Adi also runs a design blog, The Place Is Gone Now, which features his own photography, his artwork, and design inspiration. Today we highlight some of Adi’s beautiful photography, published on Instagram, whilst learning a little more about the man behind the lens. What is the inspiration behind your minimalist photo collection? I personally like simple things, but those simple things have to be very interesting and well considered. I like to meet and get involved with people who share the same interest and way of thinking, be it a matter of fashion, design, architecture etc. All these things reflect my style and the way I am. How does your surroundings impact your creativity? Apart from my formal study, I have been observing different styles of people in the cyber world. Not only am I very interested in minimalism, which I especially like, but I also find designs of different directions very intriguing and resourceful. I often visit book stores in Bangkok where designers meet and exchange ideas. It is a great source of new inspiration. When and how...


The latest addition to fashion designer Phillip Lim’s fleet of boutiques is the flagship by Hackney-based retail designers Campaign. Located on Great Jones Street in New York City, the store presents the label 3.1 Phillip Lim in a generous space across 325 square meters of poured-concrete, limestone and marble flooring. The archetype columns of NoHo’s loft spaces provide the datum where gold fixture rails are centered upon, engaging a dialogue with the subdued furniture and plinths bases chosen for their quiet textures and colors in champagne-gold legs, green mink marble and onyx. These accent the white minimalist space beautifully and do not distract from the curated clothing on display. Large slabs of stones anchor the back of the store like a stage for the display of shoes and accessories, yet the slabs lead to the monolithic dressing area at the rear of the store. These hard surfaces are juxtaposed by elements such as the softness of the curved plywood wall that leads downstairs, the wash of light from the skylight above and the large studio canvases as rectilinear backdrops placed against the side walls add depth to the interior. It is an ethereal space, a strong brand direction for the fashion label and a beautiful minimalist interior that makes me look forward to...


Established in 2011 by Amy Venter and based in Durban, South Africa, Jane Sews is an artisan clothing and accessories line with a beautiful, fresh, simple aesthetic, prioritising uplifted feminine staples and timeless pieces. Every design element is carefully considered and close attention is paid to fine construction and finish. I love the airy simplicity of the pieces and the elegance of the accessories. The brand launches seasonal small run collections crafted from high quality natural fabrics, seeking to be both functional and easy to wear.


The magnet stripe bar is created by Seiji Oguri and Yohei Oki, founders of id inc. The minimalist bar, part of the Magnet collection by id inc., is a holder for the alternately hidden magnets. Firstly for the magnets, secondly — when a magnet is pulled out — for paper notes or photos. Each magnet can be pulled out and placed in a preferred place. When a magnet is pulled out the space changes colour creating a nice graphic effect. Even when not in use the bar can be a nice decorative element in your space. The magnet stripe bar is made in a white-red and a white-grey edition. The white-grey is more neutral and will fit best with a wide range of interiors.


Global L is a new wall absorbents collection designed by the Swedish designers Johan Kauppi & Bertil Harström for the company Glimakra of Sweden. In this collaboration the company wanted something genuine from its own area to offer the global customers, so the inspiration was found in the traditional Swedish old façades and roofs of wood. The result is two patterns gathered under the name “L” as in Local, available in two groups by size — long panels and short panels, which can be used freely for creation of unique walls. They have a load-bearing frame in MDF, a sound-absorbing padding of polyurethane foam and upholstery in a wide offer of fabrics, making all manufacturing and production at Glimakra of Sweden with great craftsmanship.


VOWEL‘s new Octa collection is one that interweaves found materials, whereby a new value becomes redefined. VOWEL is a collaborative effort of duo Beau Bertens and Eline Ceelen where their design philosophy is based on creating an archive of projects that balance on the border between art and design. Based in the Netherlands, their work is founded on archaeological, scientific and philosophical discoveries, together with reimagining their next lives. Octa is primarily a jewelry collection, which an overt emphasis on neck adornment. The series sees the repurposing of existing used materials, and thus infuse a new meaning to their function, through form expression. The palette is minimal and the resulting forms are streamlined and beautiful. This is a limited collection, and is available through their site. Photography courtesy of Benjamin van Witsen.


Founded in 2008 by Ben Gorham, Byredo is a Stockholm based fragrance house, that features a wide range of products for men and women, including perfume, body care, home fragrances and accessories. With a distinct focus on craftsmanship and quality, it is particularly Byredo’s beautiful and understated packaging design that leaves a lasting impression on me. The art direction, identity and packaging was conceived by Swedish designer Moses Voigt of Acne Art Department. The project included a customised identity typeface for labels — creating an image of heritage; characters based on modernist principles and the characteristics of 1900’s gothics. Modern yet timeless through its simple elegance. From the simple typography to the minimalistic labelling, I’m certainly sold and will soon be picking out a cologne to sample.


With her LA based eponymous fashion label, designer Shaina Mote sets a new standard in integrating a regenerative quality and versatility to a strong and distinct style. The new and exciting way she creates minimalist silhouettes with multi purpose details might be a result of her very personal approach towards fashion: I work quite intuitively and I think that for me personally the lack of formal training has allowed me to feel free to experiment to reach a conclusion with each piece. — Need Supply introduction I love the way Shaina Mote adds a hint of playfulness to her staple design. Over time, it lets you discover new ways to wear your favorite garments. It makes every piece even more combinable, while at the same time lifting it above other generic wardrobe basics.


Located at the heart of an apple orchard, in the region of South Tyrolean Dolomites near Bolzano, stands a curious and eye-catching mirror structure. Celebrated architect, Peter Pichler blurs the lines between a relevant contemporary construction on the countryside and art installation. A valiant move for a region known for rejoicing long-standing traditions. The premise of the project is a Vacation Home, taking into account the surrounding area and the upmost comfort and privacy for the guests. The front of the house showcases an honest modernist façade, with clean geometric lines. The interior design follows the cue with a strong white color dominance, with the occasional raw wood on walls and furniture. It’s worth mentioning the house boasts a floating illusion above the ground thanks to well-placed foundations — the light-project for the night time is exquisite, taking the striking mirror walls a step further. It may not be an explicit intention, however I find the gorgeous Mirror Houses to be a crossbreed of flawless architecture and a site-specific that would fit art magazines effortlessly.