Minimalissimo


Taipei Apartment is a clean white apartment in Taipei, the capital city of Taiwan. The apartment was designed for a young couple by Tai & Architectural Design. The couple wanted a beautiful dwelling that didn’t require much renovation. The architects answered their request with a bright and causal living environment. Every surface of the apartment, from the floor to the ductwork in the ceiling, is painted white. The whiteness is intended to celebrate the purity of the space. The living room features a grey sofa, pastel-colored end tables, and a projector screen. Across the room is the dining area which includes a white table, wooden chairs, and built-in shelving. A wall of glass highlights the view of the city and opens to a small balcony. A narrow hallway leads to the bedroom and study. These rooms are furnished similar to the living room: white and wood furniture accented with soft colors. I love how such a simple design can express so much character. The white interior is the perfect backdrop for the residents’ colorful furniture and textiles. The stark interior allows these objects to pop and bring personality to the space. Taipei Apartment is sure to be a hit with the current and future occupants.


Tony Smith’s current exhibition Forms through Matthew Marks Gallery is a testament to his life’s work. The series of space-enveloping forms are striking, bold and minimal. Tony’s iconic, geometric metal forms actual emerged in tandem with the burgeoning minimalist scene, and this exhibition is a nod to this dedication. Responsible for more than fifty large-scale sculptures in the final two decades of this life, his work as a contemporary of American art still stands relevant and as beautiful as ever. His works, in particular, the curation of Forms, highlights how art can have a transformative ability; that through art and sculpture, spaces and architectures can be created and changed. Smith’s work is described as contributing to the idea of reductionism that lies at the heart of minimalism. And that contribution is to be celebrated. His estate is handled through Matthew Marks Gallery.


Swiss artist Zimoun, creator of exceptional minimalist sound installations, some of which you may already be familiar with, has recently introduced me to his latest work. As a collaboration with architect Hannes Zweifel, Zimoun installed 81 boxes between two levels of a room at the Mannheimer Kunstverein gallery in Germany. The boxes hang between floor and ceiling and can be seen from two different levels. 20 dc-motors are mounted and distributed along a handrail. When activated, they set the boxes in motion by means of thin nylon ropes connected vertically to the individual boxes, causing them to move with varying intensity and directions. Since the spaces between the boxes are small, the movement of one box affects neighbouring boxes, leading to a very complex overall performance of the suspension, which constantly changes and progresses. Zimoun explains: The collision of the boxes and the friction caused when they collide gives rise to a multitude of sounds and noises. The acoustic perspective changes as the viewer moves along the exhibition space and can be experienced in constantly new ways. Minimalist, ambient sound with wonderful visuals. Outstanding work. → Watch the 20 dc-motors, 81 cardboard boxes video


Renowned New York City-based designer Narciso Rodriguez displays his signature minimalist forms and sensual silhouettes in his Resort 2015 collection with understated details of geometric cutouts, simple lines that highlight the anatomy and even a twist of floral prints reduced to a pure bold graphic. Stunningly nonchalant, the collection embodies the architectural fluidity in the construction and tailoring of body-con dresses and separates of bell and A-lines. Cut-outs around the ribcage and scapulas; a black line that follows the curve of the spine on a white dress; color blocks that highlight dropped waists and curves, minimalism breathes such confidence and sensuality in this collection, a collection that will withstand trends and seasons. Images courtesy of www.narcisorodriguez.com.


Prism mirror table is a remarkable project developed by the Tokyo based designer Tokujin Yoshioka for Glas Italia, a historic manufacturer of glass furniture with a long standing tradition. The table is comprised of thick high-transparency mirror glass, and it was made possible using innovative cutting techniques. Yoshioka explains: With the cut technique on glass surface, it gives off clear and miraculous sparkling expressed by the refraction of light like a prism. This piece is a table like a shimmering sculpture reflecting the view of surroundings as if water surface be. This simple and poetic result was presented during the last Salone del Mobile in Milan.


Let me present you the minimalist Classic watch by Melbourne based AÃRK Collective. What I like about the Classic watch are the little geometric details. The first hand, outlined by a dodecagon representing the hours, is simple but the minute hand, in which a small hexagon is integrated, stands out. The hexagon is also used as an outline for the independent second representing the seconds. The crown is triangle shaped. Perfectly balanced in design and function, this watch is a true representation of AÃRK. The band and outershell is made from durable plastic while an internal case made of stainless steel protects the Japanse Quartz movement. The finish on both the case and the band is matte satin which makes the Classic soft to touch and comfortable to wear. The Classic is available in multiple colours. Pick one that suits your taste, mood and outfit.


Belgium based studio Five AM completed the interior of the new bedroom suite at a house in Bellegem, west Belgium, initially designed by studio Arch-id. The space was transformed by lifting the attic roof, which allowed to locate a bathroom isle inside the big open room. Arch-id explain the design: As the owner wanted an open and airy feeling, we designed a monolithic white box that doesn’t reach the ceiling. The height delivers the privacy when needed, but makes it still possible to interact with each other. The entire bathroom was produced in ‘solid surface’, which ensures seamless surfaces. The sidewall can unfold which makes interaction between sleeping and bathing possible. I love the delicate staircase leading to the bedroom and the sense of secluded space inside the all-white bathroom cube. The low bench that wraps around the room conceals ample storage, a nice touch, contributing to the clean and uncluttered state of the space. Photography by Thomas De Bruyne/Cafeine


Koya No Sumika is an extension to a traditional home in Yaizu, Japan. The extension was designed for a young couple by mA-style Architects. The Japanese firm came up with a modern design with space saving solutions. The result is a refreshing juxtaposition to the traditional architecture of the original home. The exterior is a balance between white cement board and natural wood. The mix of crisp white and warm wood continues on the interior. The lofted ceiling features triangles of unfinished wood. White walls frame the lower portion of the home, sprinkled on both sides with built-in furniture. The decor is bare, just a few plants and lightbulbs strung from the ceilings. A simple courtyard garden adds a touch of green and connects the expansion with the original building. Koya No Sumika is a gorgeous structure inside and out. The materials are arranged so as to add character to the space, without losing its minimal appeal. Overall, this is a charming home expansion that the residents will enjoy for years to come.


Dedicated, disciplined and ridiculously handsome menswear label, SCTT BNDCTN is being released for order September 2014. The label has existed as an enigma in the fashion world since 2012 and had existed purely as a brand. Through various social media outlets to the tune of Tumblr, Facebook and Soundcloud; SCTT BNDCTN has been an encompassment of sensory intrigue. That is until now. The intensely strong brand and clear dedication to adorning men is the work of its inceptionist and Master Tailor, Warren Harrison. Based in Melbourne, the pieces are a result of tireless precision. The influence of Japanese patternmaking, traditional tailoring and experimental design is obvious and fiercely beautiful. SCTT BNDCTN celebrates the male form through a methodical use of linen, wool, leather and cotton. The designer’s passion is clear. Although a rarity, this handcrafted menswear line for discerning, stoic types, is undoubtedly one to watch. And listen to. And be inspired by the mood it instills. There is a clarity and stillness to SCTT BNDCTN that should be celebrated. Photography by Jem Taylor and make-up by Nadja Mott.


The late Dutch industrial designer and sculptor, Aldo van den Nieuwelaar, characterised by geometric abstraction, a systematic approach and a minimal use of image resources — consistently represents simplicity and clarity of form in his work, reducing the design of all his products to their very essence. When I discovered the quite wonderful and minimalistic Cirkellamp by Aldo van den Nieuwelaar, I was surprised it hadn’t already been featured here on Minimalissimo. Originally designed in 1968 and consisting of a perfectly proportioned circle and square, Cirkellamp was produced in 2010 in honour of the great designer by Dutch lighting brand, Boops. The lamp has been updated with modern technology and makes use of a stepless dim button by a pulse dimmer. Beautiful, elegant and masterfully minimalist. Expect to see a few more Aldo van den Nieuwelaar designs celebrated in the future.


Simple but iconographic. That is what the team at Italian fashion accessory brand Design Digest aims for. It results in contemporary, monomateric jewellery, which is committed to simplicity, but reflects the Design Digest background in architecture and fine arts: The women who wear Design Digest accessories leave nothing to chance. They love to be ahead of the times with careful consideration and a strong intuition to recognize beauty through research. I am drawn to Design Digest by its minimalism. But at the same time I am impressed at how much the pieces stand out in an outfit, how much of a clear statement they are when worn. It’s like wearing an agile object of art.


London-based designer and British bone china specialist Richard Brendon has been developing a number of studio collaborations with Patternity, a specialist organization dedicated solely to pattern, the latest being a bone china collection with the British traditional luxury homeware shop Fortnum & Mason. Resulting from Brendon’s dream of rejuvenating and repositioning the British bone china industry, the collection warps perceptions of what bone china can look like, featuring a precise, pure geometric pattern in Fortnum & Mason’s signature delicate color Eau de Nil, and are available for purchase. Born from a drive to use pattern as a tool to inspire, explore and innovate, Patternity comprises a pattern research/consultancy department, a pioneering events and education hub, and an award-winning creative studio, frequently developing collaborations with designers on a number of different fashion, interior, and product design projects.