Minimalissimo


So, how is a book named You Have Too Much Shit minimal? You may ask. Chris Thomas may answer, you’d be surprised. Based in London, UK, Thomas is a multi-disciplinary designer with a strong emphasis on graphic work with radical interests. Recently, he published a small self-help book titled You Have Too Much Shit. The publication comes in small copies of risograph-printed booklets with a monolithic design for the cover. The black type on ivory textured paper reminds one of Constructivist propaganda, which is an underlying purpose of the book itself. Not only the cover conveys minimalism, but the contents also do the job. Criticizing on the consumerist culture of today’s world, Chris cheekily offered a possibility towards a simpler lifestyle. Here, the designer (possibly part-time philosopher) goes beyond superficial minimal idealism to promote a deeper look at our maximal way of living and buying. I personally love the way YHTMS pushes the boundaries of Minimalissimo and gives us a chance to broaden our objective of delivering minimal projects to our readers. The book can be digitally downloaded for free. Or you can also buy it, ironically of course.


A Wallpaper* Design Award 2015 winner for Best Brand Extension, the Vipp Shelter is a minimalist prefabricated house designed by Danish design company Vipp. This monochromatic 55m2 structure is designed to be placed in the natural setting of your choice. Furniture, appliances, lighting, tableware and towels have already been picked out and will be waiting for you on your first arrival, six months after you place your order. It contains a large kitchen with a dining and living area, a hall, separate bathroom and a stunning loft space. Morten Bo Jensen, Vipp’s chief designer, explains: We see the house as a product (such as a caravan, yacht, private jet, etc.) and not as a piece of architecture — hence the name “shelter”. The design is completely fixed and everything down to the smallest detail is designed in advance. 75 years of experience with steel processing is used to craft this prefabricated object designed to perfection. The only choice left to the customer is where to place it. So it is neither a house nor a mobile home. Rather it is a spacious, functional, and liveable industrial object. Amazing. Photography courtesy of Vipp.


This modern, monochromatic home in Copenhagen was designed by Sofie and Frank Christensen Egelund of the design brand Vipp. The townhouse was built in 1898 and renovated by the Egelunds several years ago. Five narrow levels hold enough living space for the couple and their four children. The neutral palette and classic furniture pieces tie each level together; every room is brimming with the Egelunds’ elegant design choices. Creative uses of lighting and texture allow the monochromatic spaces to feel dynamic instead of stark. Each furniture and decor piece was carefully chosen to match the home’s Scandinavian style. Custom shelving and built-in storage keep the large family neat and organized. Copenhagen Townhouse manages sleek minimalism with loads of personality.


Eunhyuk Choi’s Deconstruction series of hand pieces are minimalist adornment at its best. Based in London, Choi is a jeweler, maker, designer and artist. His work is an intriguing portfolio of silversmithing at its best, and his techniques are most explorative. His pieces include rings, neckpieces, bracelets and tableware. Originally from Korea, his background and reference to rituals and traditions is clear and beautifully executed. Deconstruction sees a series of simplified lines brought together with the cleanest and well-articulated goldsmithing techniques. The seams are ironically, seamless. This is beautiful. These pieces add an element of sophistication to the wearer; a sculptural and understated statement. Eunhyuk Choi is emerging, and definitely worth following. Photography courtesy of Eunhyuk Choi.


With a penchant for honest, aesthetic, clean and tactile design, Tokyo based designer Kazushige Miyake is no stranger to Minimalissimo, and towards the end of last year designed an air purifier for Japanese company Muji. Featuring a dual counter fan and 360°dust collection and deodorizing filter, this air purifier quickly removes matter suspended in the air. The outer casing of the product has a cylindrical shape in line with that of the filter. Air is drawn in from around the air purifier and clean air is emitted from the top of the device. Less junk in the air means more oxygen to breathe. The smart cylindrical design, not dissimilar to Apple’s Mac Pro, is sleek, simple and discreet, shying away from the typical bulky and unnatractive purifier appliances. Lovely work. Photography courtesy of Muji and Goichi Kondo.


Pearl Bay Residence was designed by Gavin Maddock Design Studio as a holiday home which the client would eventually retire to. Located in Yzerfontein, 90km from Cape Town, South Africa, it is surrounded by the magnificent landscape of ocean views and coastal dunes. Every single experience within the residence has a view out of the expansive landscape like art that breathes within the living spaces. The operable walls of windows allow an uninterrupted transition between interior and exterior, allowing the landscape to be unavoidable at every level. Structural columns strategically placed to allow the spans of up to 14 meters while over 3 meter ceiling heights create the truly uninhibited experience of being connected to the environment. In the minimalist language of the architecture, small nuances of Mediterranean vernacular details coexist seamlessly with the modern, purist materials of white walls, concrete and wood. Though it was realised on a limited budget, the result is a breathtaking, luxurious habitat where the minimal architecture lets the views take over. Photography by Adam Letch.


Born from the three-way collaboration between Tucson, Arizona-based apparel shops Bon Boutique and Desert Vintage and the sensitive eye of photographer Krysta Jabczenski, this Spring Summer 2015 lookbook is a fun, sunny photoshoot with stylish colour-blocked clothes and clean, simple surroundings. Bon is a small mother-and-daughter enterprise, with a love of things that are well designed and well made and a lovely curatorial eye for mixing the unexpected. Joining their wares with Desert Vintage’s tulle skirts, jewellery and sombreros, the lookbook manages to be soft and jovial, yet pared down and sophisticated. Shot in Barrio Viejo, Tucson, AZ, by Krysta Jabczenski.


We are now halfway through winter in the Northern Hemisphere and one needs quality apparel to face the elements. The Styrman is a waterproof topcoat by San Francisco based Mission Workshop. Their aim is to help you cover the most ground possible. The Styrman, made in Vancouver, British Columbia, is their take on the classic topcoat improved with all the advantages of modern technical outerwear. The jacket is constructed of c_change fabric developed by Schoeller from Switzerland. This membrane reacts to different prevailing conditions. It does not only take temperature into account but also humidity and body moisture. The waterproof-breathable membrane, with taped seams, gives full protection against rain, wind and snow. The storm hood is removable if you prefer. The wool exterior of this smart jacket gives a tailored appearance. The Styrman is available in charcoal or grey. A great jacket for daily commute and outdoor use!


When great creativity is followed by perfect technical work, the result can be something as astonishing as this campaign for the Dutch company Friesland Campina Kievit — promotion of their powdered milk creamers. The fully integrated marketing campaign was created by Norvell Jefferson agency, where the Belgian photographer Jeffrey Vanhoutte developed a lovely photo shoot, capturing the acrobatic dancer Noi Pakon moving with fine particles of powdered milk. Without doubt, a remarkable and complicated collaboration that investigates many of aspects such as motion, still and light, to create a plain and pure result. You can also the watch the fantastic making-of video.


Casa Balint is an elegant white home located adjacent to a golf course outside of Valencia, Spain. Designed by Fran Silvestre Arquitectos, this unique home is formed of one sweeping elliptical motion. This form extrudes and intrudes at key moments to create space for rooms and windows. The arched roof, cantilevered at certain points, is supported by four concrete posts. The roof dictates where shadows hit the home, providing light and shade where needed. This shape serves practical functions in addition to its aesthetic value. The elliptical allowed the structure to take up minimal space on the site, minimizing the disturbance of the surrounding landscape. The interior features three floors. On the ground floor, the kitchen and living spaces have large windows that look out on to the garden. The bedrooms are located in the more private spaces upstairs, while an underground area provides additional living and patio space. In the backyard, a curved pool mimics the shape of the house. Casa Balint embodies the notion of architecture as an art form. This home is so much more than a functional living space; it is a true work of art.


Simon Legald’s Pocket for Normann Copenhagen adds a niche, literally, to any space. Made from Polypropylene, available in six colours, these pockets add an element of storage that goes beyond the traditional. Purposely designed to not add any unnecessary details, these are Scandinavian chic. There is an over emphasis on the function, with a streamlined and uncluttered aesthetic. Designed to be dishwasher safe, the mounting bracket is completely hidden once the Pocket organiser has been mounted. At Normann Copenhagen, they love to challenge the design rules and find traditional materials put into untraditional use. The Pocket is no exception; it is a celebration of these values. Photography courtesy of Normann Copenhagen.


It’s time to put music back into our daily lives, simply and beautifully. Audio accessories brand, Aether, have designed a music player that thinks. Cone is a wireless speaker with voice recognition technology that takes your requests and learns your tastes. It understands artists, albums and songs, so when you know exactly what you want to hear, just ask. Cone’s design carefully considers the human hand. Its dial is easy to turn in one palm, and when you change the song or genre you will feel it fall into place with a soft, magnetic snap. With eight hours of battery life, Cone is engineered to deliver impressively rich, detailed audio through a 3” woofer and 20-watt amplifier. As you may also expect, Cone supports AirPlay and Bluetooth connectivity. Beyond its impressive technical attributes, Cone has a wonderful aesthetic that features a smooth, minimalist design and is available in two colours: black & copper, and white & silver.