Minimalissimo


Studio de Materia’s Light Soil V2 is a beautiful fusion of clean lines. The intersecting elements seem to float and hold one another, but in a way that oozes effortlessness. The use of the natural shape of the terrain by placing the garage on the street level helps separate and delineate functionality of the spaces. Situated in Poznan, Poland, the use of concrete, glass and wood are so well integrated that the resulting architecture seems almost soft. The lack of clutter and nod to the surrounding landscape are both subtle and contextually sensitive. Studio de Materia has combined a clear technical knowledge base with a minimalist aesthetic that compliments the context and adds clear value to the aesthetic appreciation-ist. Photography courtesy of Rzemioslo Architektoniczne.


Romanian studio Clean Everything recently produced their latest collection of simple, elegant, vegetable tanned leather goods titled, Trilogy. Sharp edges and sleek touches are the key inspiration and theme of this collection, which, as its title suggests, includes three pieces. The Triangle Folded Clutch is a simple and elegant clutch featuring a sleek folded design involving one piece of leather and one polished metal stud. Based on the classic Italian coin purses the triangle has been enlarged and cleaned up, transforming it into an entirely different and contemporary piece. The Triangle Folded Backpack is a stylish and innovative triangle shaped leather backpack with adjustable shoulder straps. Its uniqueness originates from the folding design using one piece of leather, manipulated into shape, and riveted together with two metal studs. The Stitchless Bag, crafted from two pieces of vegetable tanned leather with no stitches, is a minimalist shoulder bag that allows you to effortlessly carry your daily essentials with style. Each design is available in three colour variations — red, white and green. Photography by Robert Petreanu


A vision of the perfect watch — affordable as well as classic and trendy at the same time. It brought together an elaborate group of entrepreneurs from Switzerland, France, Italy, Belgium and Estonia under the name of Greyhours. Their dream was to design and market the most essential watches, combining sober elegance with modern solidity. Two beautiful minimalistic models have come to life since Greyhours made its dream come true. One black, one white, both very expressive in their pure essence. While Greyhours relies on traditional Swiss watchmaking expertise, this is combined with forward-looking manufacturing techniques from Asia. This way, they bring together classic materials like italian leather with modern techniques, such as diamond-like carbon coating. The most alluring aspect about Greyhours watches is their nostalgia-free approach towards an item that can and should be handed down from generation to generation, while telling a story about the moment in history in which it was designed. Greyhours are also offering our Minimalissimo readers a 15% discount with the code: XX-FEEH-E73F-1807-8975


With a French name and a Catalan heart, Deux Souliers is a Barcelona-based footwear brand led by designer Nunu Solsona, who also shares the creative direction with Folch Studio. Deux Soulier advocates a slow fashion spirit and a contemporary craft ideology, prioritizing comfort, quality and responsible manufacturing (every shoe is handmade in Menorca, Spain). The Spring/Summer ’14 collection de-contextualizes classic shoe designs, featuring sandal-shaped and often unisex models with a sophisticated sport aesthetic, and materials like cowhide or clean cotton provide subtle texture to their neutral-toned color palette. Albert Folch, creative director of Folch Studio, shared with us a bit of insight into the process behind the brand’s aesthetics, which he described as reductionist in itself. Deux Souliers means Two Shoes in French – simple as that, a simplicity that is at the core of every byproduct of the brand – from  beautifully crafted shoes to advertising campaigns, branding and online presence. The focus is the product, and every aesthetic decision revolves around featuring it in the most straightforward, best possible way. Nunu is also interested in maintaining open door sessions at their studio in order to maintain closeness with the client – in fact, it’s how I had the opportunity to experience first-hand the lovely ethos of the brand. Campaign photography by Teddy Iborra.


Pedrali, an Italian multi-disciplinary design firm established in 1963, has recently launched their newest furniture collection that showcases their collaborative ethics with innovative thinkers. With a series of wooden and upholstered products, the functionality gives rise to designs that are both fun and simple. With notable seating items such as “Snow Junior” by Odo Fioravanti; “Log” by Manuela Busetti, Andrea Garuti, and Matteo Redaelli;  “Tivoli” by Cazzaniga, Mandelli, and Pagliarulo; and “Zippo” by Pedrali R&D; they apparently show the way of integrating technology into craft, quality, and materiality. “Parenthesis” by Claudio Dondoli and Marco Pocci consists of three different coffee tables with quirky shapes and a tongue-in-cheek set of round brackets. “Flag” By Pio and Tito Toso is a variety of coat hangers that are both sleek and unconventional. All of the objects mentioned above combined to be a colorfully minimal collection and adds a punch of personality to one’s home, while still maintain an exuding elegance. Minimalism doesn’t mean simply black and white, but it means functionality over aesthetic; this 2014 furniture set of Pedrali proved that effectively. And the way these products are displayed is just a cherry on top to this wonderfully curated showcase.


This collection of simple leather sleeves for Apple devices has been created by the Dutch company Mujjo. All pieces are simple, slim and at the same time provide enough room to carry your iThing plus a few extras. The iPhone and iPad cases are folded from a single piece of leather in such a way that there is an integrated pocket for your papers, cards, earphones and other essentials. The Macbook sleeves feature felt for extra padding. They have a compartment inside to fit your stuff. Here is how designers explain their vision: We obsessively try to keep it as simple as possible, while trying to make each part as good as possible, every stitch, every button, they have all been intensively thought out. While it’s not easy to keep things simple, it does pay off to create a product that is perfect in a sense of simplicity to that extent that you cannot leave anything away without compromising it’s intention. I love the functionality of these pieces. While slimming the lines, designers did not strip away the comfort. I would appreciate more colors though.


Camilla and Marc’s SS 2014 collection embodies what their brand has always preached; flattering silhouettes, clean lines, keen attention to detail. The collection sees a fusion of strong lines, draping and a restrained palette. The resulting pieces embody minimalism to a tee and are fresh beautiful adornments. They can’t help but entice mass envy. Based in Australia and built on a contemporary and effortlessly elegant philosophy, their portfolio is nothing short of handsome. Since their launch in 2003, Camilla and Marc have headed innovation in luxury Australian women’s fashion. The brother and sister duo’s passion for working with quality textiles and couturier techniques such as draping have seen them hold their own. SS 2014 is a curation of beautiful, considered and texturally opulent pieces. Knowing them is a must. Photography courtesy of Camilla and Marc.


Photographer and science journalist Jean de Pomereu, fascinated by Antarctica’s enormous icebergs, has produced a beautifully bleak series of the icy continent titled, Sans Nom. The series, captured in 2008 at the fourth International Polar Year, is deliberately absent of anything that could give scale to the nameless ice structures. Nameless because unlike mountains, for example, which are around for a long period of time, these icebergs are only present for one season and then they get released — they just disappear. De Pomereu writes: Icebergs without names. Totems of the underworld transiting at the frozen interface of water and atmosphere; born of the perpetual transformation of the physical realm. At a time when the vulnerability of the chryosphere is made increasingly apparent by the work of scientists, this series of photographs, Sans Nom, seek to evoke the fragility, as well as the generative power of ice. The shot with a broad crack splitting the ice plains, is a particular favourite of mine. Demonstrating the fragility of the ice, the beginning of a break up process, the coming of summer. Photography courtesy of Jean de Pomereu


Designed for a group of artists to reside, work and exhibit, the architect Jun Murata of Jam Architecture transformed a house in Osaka, Japan, of former wood construction into one of modern simplicity and elegant, minimalist finishes. The spaces were carefully thought out to accommodate the needs of the artists. Public and private are logically separated: the living and dining, as well as the tatami spaces face south where one can assume the intent is so that the residents can enjoy the natural light. On the other hand, the opposite side of the house meant for reading and art installation is designed with more controlled lighting where slivers of light penetrating the interiors, making it an integral part of any art installation. The architect has acknowledged that as carefully designed this minimalist mix-use house is for the artists, plants can give the space a rich contrast. I especially love the fact that the number and type of plants chosen for the space is minimal as well, allowing the harmony of their presence compliment the spaces they are in. Images courtesy of Jun Murata / Jam Architecture.


Thaw sofa is one of the latest works launched by the Japanese design studio Junpei Tamaki Design during this year’s SaloneSatellite in Milan. It is a reference to images of thawed fluffy snow, producing a wonderful feeling of softness and comfort. The curved silhouette of Thaw is accompanied by a rounded oak detail that frames the whole piece — a continuous line to serve the seat, arm and backrest in one, resulting in a great formal simplicity. I particularly like how the wood is integrated so well on this kind of design, achieving a sense of quality and warmth. Photography by Takumi Ota


This minimalist Piggy Bank is created by Selma Durand during her Master thesis of Industrial Design in ENSCI-Les Ateliers, Paris. Durand wanted to focus on the everyday situation where people collect pocket change without being aware of its value. In fact they usually put it in a pin tray where it stays untouched. Especially the cent coins are undervalued and one can use Piggy Bank to collect those. Piggy Bank, made of a ceramic outer container and a brass inner container, uses a clever hidden mechanism to weigh the pocket change as coins are stacking. Both containers level when the value of the coins is approximately 1 euro. I chose to focus on 1 euro because it is a standard unit which also corresponds to the price of a baguette, a coffee or a stamp. Being one stashing my pocket change in an old box, where it stays untouched, I really like the thought behind this minimalist piggy bank. Love the combination of materials too.


Armada armchair has been created by Croatia-based designer Zoran Jedrejcic. The base of the piece is comprised of a steel frame covered in wood, and the seat features a thin steel layer covered in high quality leather. This combination gives Armada the structural integrity it needs while preserving the weightless appearance. I love how sculpturesque and beautifully balanced the piece looks. Additional elements, such as cushions, upholstery and back support, can be added to Armada via magnets. Different types of leather and wood are available. The chair can also be made to order and accommodate custom measurements.