Minimalissimo


L & G Studio’s sculptural salt and pepper Cylinder Shakers are outstanding. Formally and functionally, they are a streamlined, sleek and glistening beacon to what they essentially stand to represent, the adding of a nuance to a situation; the culinary situation. Seattle-based Ladies & Gentlemen Studio is founded by Dylan Davis and Jean Lee and explores playful explorations in materiality where they blend their resourceful curiosity with the desire to find unexpected pairings. Available in Brass, Copper and Aluminum, these stealth pieces are 1.25” diameter and 3.25” tall. Since L & G Studio’s inception in 2010, their curated collection is one to watch. These pieces, being no exception. Their ever-evolving set of ideas and experiments collected from their everyday discoveries, explorations and surroundings should inspire and excite. Photography courtesy of L & G Studio.


Yield is an independent design house that crafts and manufactures a range of bags, jewellery, and household accessories. Established in 2012 by Rachel Gant and Andrew Deming, the Saint Augustine based designers create timeless pieces that blend beauty, sustainability and ethical production — a refreshing ‘no compromise’ approach. Now you may already be familiar with Yield’s work, having been previously featured highlighting their sculptural Geo Stand Set. Today however, this sublime ceramic French Press takes centre stage. The heavy walled ceramic press pot, available in cream and grey, is a functional and beautiful addition to your kitchen table. The matte ceramic body maintains a consistent temperature throughout the simple brewing process. It’s just about timing, measuring and of course, quality beans. One of its finest features for me is the stylish copper pull. Such an elegant touch to the design. Photography courtesy of Yield.


Inspirationally and geographically nested deeply in the heart of Danish contemporary design, Copenhagen based fashion designer Anne Vest created an amazingly feminine and functional collection for Spring Summer 2015. It is, in her own words, a definition of a femme, proud and composed: Emotions lead us to interaction… Expression and mixing styles is encouraged, to challenge sartorial mannerisms within our modern wardrobes. I am not only impressed by the amazing imagery directed by Marlo Saalmink and photographed by Hordur Ingason; I am also smitten by the impeccable way Anne Vest’s designs blend very natural and sometimes even classic material with contemporary and avant-garde silhouettes. Rough edges meet graphic shapes, contrasting length silhouettes are built by organic wrap-around dresses and fitted waistcoats. In the end it all comes together in a perfectly coherent collection. Model: Julier Bugge at Scoop Models MUA: Louise Polano


It’s only natural to encounter visual variations of what can be considered a minimalist project. Loft Kolasinski, a Polish interior design firm, rebuilt and furnished a Berlin House showcasing local flavours and remixing restored pieces. Each room presents a particular dynamic and, in this case, the minimalism isn’t about absence, it’s about fundamental elements for daily routine. The furniture takes on the protagonist role for each area, showcasing beautiful wood textures and terrific industrial design. The pieces are slender and flourish-free, resulting in clean lines and infusing lightness to a heavy material. A careful selection was made for the lamps and chandeliers, each room boasting these proudly as supporting acts that battle for your attention. Last but not least, the tour de force is the grey bathroom flawlessly composed with modern lines, breaking the white colour dominance. The only extra step, that goes beyond the norm, is the Polish pottery collection from the 1950-60’s, conveying an untreated touch. It is a very difficult balance to achieve for a project to preserve a clear minimalist sensibility, and not give in to the usual ‘empty space’ motif. This is a clear example of what minimalism can be championing local rudiments. Photography by...


So, how is a book named You Have Too Much Shit minimal? You may ask. Chris Thomas may answer, you’d be surprised. Based in London, UK, Thomas is a multi-disciplinary designer with a strong emphasis on graphic work with radical interests. Recently, he published a small self-help book titled You Have Too Much Shit. The publication comes in small copies of risograph-printed booklets with a monolithic design for the cover. The black type on ivory textured paper reminds one of Constructivist propaganda, which is an underlying purpose of the book itself. Not only the cover conveys minimalism, but the contents also do the job. Criticizing on the consumerist culture of today’s world, Chris cheekily offered a possibility towards a simpler lifestyle. Here, the designer (possibly part-time philosopher) goes beyond superficial minimal idealism to promote a deeper look at our maximal way of living and buying. I personally love the way YHTMS pushes the boundaries of Minimalissimo and gives us a chance to broaden our objective of delivering minimal projects to our readers. The book can be digitally downloaded for free. Or you can also buy it, ironically of course.


A Wallpaper* Design Award 2015 winner for Best Brand Extension, the Vipp Shelter is a minimalist prefabricated house designed by Danish design company Vipp. This monochromatic 55m2 structure is designed to be placed in the natural setting of your choice. Furniture, appliances, lighting, tableware and towels have already been picked out and will be waiting for you on your first arrival, six months after you place your order. It contains a large kitchen with a dining and living area, a hall, separate bathroom and a stunning loft space. Morten Bo Jensen, Vipp’s chief designer, explains: We see the house as a product (such as a caravan, yacht, private jet, etc.) and not as a piece of architecture — hence the name “shelter”. The design is completely fixed and everything down to the smallest detail is designed in advance. 75 years of experience with steel processing is used to craft this prefabricated object designed to perfection. The only choice left to the customer is where to place it. So it is neither a house nor a mobile home. Rather it is a spacious, functional, and liveable industrial object. Amazing. Photography courtesy of Vipp.


This modern, monochromatic home in Copenhagen was designed by Sofie and Frank Christensen Egelund of the design brand Vipp. The townhouse was built in 1898 and renovated by the Egelunds several years ago. Five narrow levels hold enough living space for the couple and their four children. The neutral palette and classic furniture pieces tie each level together; every room is brimming with the Egelunds’ elegant design choices. Creative uses of lighting and texture allow the monochromatic spaces to feel dynamic instead of stark. Each furniture and decor piece was carefully chosen to match the home’s Scandinavian style. Custom shelving and built-in storage keep the large family neat and organized. Copenhagen Townhouse manages sleek minimalism with loads of personality.


Eunhyuk Choi’s Deconstruction series of hand pieces are minimalist adornment at its best. Based in London, Choi is a jeweler, maker, designer and artist. His work is an intriguing portfolio of silversmithing at its best, and his techniques are most explorative. His pieces include rings, neckpieces, bracelets and tableware. Originally from Korea, his background and reference to rituals and traditions is clear and beautifully executed. Deconstruction sees a series of simplified lines brought together with the cleanest and well-articulated goldsmithing techniques. The seams are ironically, seamless. This is beautiful. These pieces add an element of sophistication to the wearer; a sculptural and understated statement. Eunhyuk Choi is emerging, and definitely worth following. Photography courtesy of Eunhyuk Choi.


With a penchant for honest, aesthetic, clean and tactile design, Tokyo based designer Kazushige Miyake is no stranger to Minimalissimo, and towards the end of last year designed an air purifier for Japanese company Muji. Featuring a dual counter fan and 360°dust collection and deodorizing filter, this air purifier quickly removes matter suspended in the air. The outer casing of the product has a cylindrical shape in line with that of the filter. Air is drawn in from around the air purifier and clean air is emitted from the top of the device. Less junk in the air means more oxygen to breathe. The smart cylindrical design, not dissimilar to Apple’s Mac Pro, is sleek, simple and discreet, shying away from the typical bulky and unnatractive purifier appliances. Lovely work. Photography courtesy of Muji and Goichi Kondo.


Pearl Bay Residence was designed by Gavin Maddock Design Studio as a holiday home which the client would eventually retire to. Located in Yzerfontein, 90km from Cape Town, South Africa, it is surrounded by the magnificent landscape of ocean views and coastal dunes. Every single experience within the residence has a view out of the expansive landscape like art that breathes within the living spaces. The operable walls of windows allow an uninterrupted transition between interior and exterior, allowing the landscape to be unavoidable at every level. Structural columns strategically placed to allow the spans of up to 14 meters while over 3 meter ceiling heights create the truly uninhibited experience of being connected to the environment. In the minimalist language of the architecture, small nuances of Mediterranean vernacular details coexist seamlessly with the modern, purist materials of white walls, concrete and wood. Though it was realised on a limited budget, the result is a breathtaking, luxurious habitat where the minimal architecture lets the views take over. Photography by Adam Letch.


Born from the three-way collaboration between Tucson, Arizona-based apparel shops Bon Boutique and Desert Vintage and the sensitive eye of photographer Krysta Jabczenski, this Spring Summer 2015 lookbook is a fun, sunny photoshoot with stylish colour-blocked clothes and clean, simple surroundings. Bon is a small mother-and-daughter enterprise, with a love of things that are well designed and well made and a lovely curatorial eye for mixing the unexpected. Joining their wares with Desert Vintage’s tulle skirts, jewellery and sombreros, the lookbook manages to be soft and jovial, yet pared down and sophisticated. Shot in Barrio Viejo, Tucson, AZ, by Krysta Jabczenski.


We are now halfway through winter in the Northern Hemisphere and one needs quality apparel to face the elements. The Styrman is a waterproof topcoat by San Francisco based Mission Workshop. Their aim is to help you cover the most ground possible. The Styrman, made in Vancouver, British Columbia, is their take on the classic topcoat improved with all the advantages of modern technical outerwear. The jacket is constructed of c_change fabric developed by Schoeller from Switzerland. This membrane reacts to different prevailing conditions. It does not only take temperature into account but also humidity and body moisture. The waterproof-breathable membrane, with taped seams, gives full protection against rain, wind and snow. The storm hood is removable if you prefer. The wool exterior of this smart jacket gives a tailored appearance. The Styrman is available in charcoal or grey. A great jacket for daily commute and outdoor use!