Villa Kogelhof

Unambiguous visual contrast with the surrounding landscape and a great concern for self-sufficiency are the main draws for Villa Kogelhof; the prize-winning piece from Paul de Ruiter Architects, a Netherlands based firm. A true case study on how to reconcile appropriate indulgence and sustainability, while achieving such feat relying solely on two minimalist volumes.

In the age where privacy is an ever-changing concept, it’s a luxury to build a residence with no worries for discretion. The glass box is supported by a courageous steel V-frame, housing the living rooms, kitchen, bathrooms and bedrooms; it takes sophisticated planning to make it all work on a mono-volume such as this. The whole façade is made of glass, making a permanent panoramic view for its occupants, imprinting a contemporary aesthetic often found in corporate buildings.

This modern-looking residence stands bravely in the middle of a 25-hectare state, a visual intervention on the bucolic countryside. The brave adjective wasn’t applied lightly in this case, since this residence is energy neutral. Applying numerous technological solutions, the glass box manages to harvest energy throughout the year. It achieves complete autarky with a stylish exterior and a timeless interior design thanks to classic furniture from Eileen Grey and Le Corbusier.

This is the best type of solitude a minimalist building could ask for.

Photography by Jeroen Musch.