Minimalissimo


Search results for “Bathroom”

Famed Japanese design studio Nendo and Italian brand Bisazza Bagno gave birth to this beautiful bathroom collection. The line includes a crate-like bathtub, washstand and mirrors that resemble droplets of water, sticks in a stand for a towel drier, diagonally patterned mirrors, stackable containers for plans, rotating storage boxes and an elegant seating piece. Each element is an individual statement of minimalist creativity. Here is how designers explain their vision: Our objective for this bathroom collection was to create a strong singular impression by assembling the various elements of a bathroom suite as though they were ‘all in the bath together’. The feeling of connection that comes from a bath with someone you don’t know at a hot spring or local public bath is an important part of Japanese culture. Our bathroom collection for Bissazza expresses this feeling through its design. I love how many different ideas are unified by the homogeneous geometry of the collection. The combination of white and woodgrain is another theme that creates an aesthetic bond between the pieces.


British/Irish design collective UsTogether have treated us to the Ebb bathroom series. The white lines and glass sides form a striking, sculptural picture. All elements are made of LG HI-MACS, a natural acrylic stone material, giving the surfaces a high-quality, modern feel. One for my next house…


Hiking on the Swiss Alps, slowly making your way up, crossing small rivers and dodging persistent trees that get in your way, you finally arrive at a Classic log cabin for a much-deserved rest. Something unusual pulls your attention on the final approach though. Without a doubt, it is all made in concrete, irrefutable grey concrete from top to bottom. Nickisch Sano Walder Architects were very faithful to their client’s absolute request of preserving, at all costs, the original framework from the cabin. The 40sqm cabin is smartly divided in two floors: on the ground level, there’s a friendly cooking space and living room. The geometric angles work plays off with surprising results with the fur and fireplace. On a converted cellar, remnants from the original structure, the bedroom and bathroom are concealed amongst a beautiful wall of rocks. An intimate atmosphere springs from a surprising monolith residence. An alluring and beautiful minimalist retreat comes forth, with the help of very well planned windows to control the lighting and hand-picked fabrics to counterbalance the austerity of the concrete. Concrete proves time after time that it’s an ideal play date for a number of materials, even fur.


Unambiguous visual contrast with the surrounding landscape and a great concern for self-sufficiency are the main draws for Villa Kogelhof; the prize-winning piece from Paul de Ruiter Architects, a Netherlands based firm. A true case study on how to reconcile appropriate indulgence and sustainability, while achieving such feat relying solely on two minimalist volumes. In the age where privacy is an ever-changing concept, it’s a luxury to build a residence with no worries for discretion. The glass box is supported by a courageous steel V-frame, housing the living rooms, kitchen, bathrooms and bedrooms; it takes sophisticated planning to make it all work on a mono-volume such as this. The whole façade is made of glass, making a permanent panoramic view for its occupants, imprinting a contemporary aesthetic often found in corporate buildings. This modern-looking residence stands bravely in the middle of a 25-hectare state, a visual intervention on the bucolic countryside. The brave adjective wasn’t applied lightly in this case, since this residence is energy neutral. Applying numerous technological solutions, the glass box manages to harvest energy throughout the year. It achieves complete autarky with a stylish exterior and a timeless interior design thanks to classic furniture from Eileen Grey...


Unusual geometry and minimalism makes for an incredible pair, especially when applied to renovation projects and updating old structures to contemporary standards. Taking over an existing post-and-beam building, maintaining all the best elements to its advantage and adapting the inner workings to the owners’ lifestyle are Patrick Tighe Architecture’s triumphs for this Malibu based residence. The ceiling makes its presence quite obvious throughout the house, as it shapes itself as a main feature; for this reason, the visual dynamic is built around the roof’s geometry. The windows and furniture work their way around it, with unconcealed adaptations in the bedrooms, living rooms and even bathrooms. This residence remixes a timeworn architectonic element that is often hidden or modified to achieve uniformity, and breathes new life with eclectic variations. The owner’s art and design collection is tastefully incorporated into the daily life; as display niches, special lighting and white canvas spaces make room for each piece to shine. The end result is a very dynamic and vibrant residence, with sharp angles and various textures in all rooms. The grand entry door says it all, its uneven shape introduces the concept in a glance. Minimalism can flirt with eccentricity from time to...


Micro-Apartment Moabit is the result of a creative renovation by Berlin-based design studio spamroom. This tiny Berlin apartment was in need of a unique renovation not only because of its small size, but because of its early 1900’s construction. Like many buildings built at the turn of the century, this apartment featured several small and crowded rooms and was heavy with layers of renovations from previous owners. The design plan was to open up the space by removing all of the interior walls and rebuild an interior system that maximized the potential of every square meter. A central core was created to hold the kitchen and bathroom, and a mezzanine, accessed by a small white staircase, was added for the sleeping space. This simple design takes advantage of typically wasted space, such as tall ceilings and stair landings, to create a supremely functional living area. Many of the home’s original materials were salvaged during construction and incorporated in the renovated home. As a result, this light and airy design has a touch of Art Nouveau charm. This micro-apartment is just 21 square meters; not a space that most people would jump at living in. But with the right design team, even the tiniest of homes can be...


Minimalism, one can argue, heightens one’s experience of the details and the surroundings. Not only that, it also creates the notion of multi-functionality of an object or a space. A perfect example is a minimal home in Montréal, Canada called In Suspension by Naturehumaine. The house, with a rather open floor plan, provides a double-height space in the social area for a physical exercise room with a few corresponding fixtures. That atrium then is utilized as a light bringer for its two sides, occupied with a kitchen and a study room that looks out to the main road. Up above on the second floor are two plywood-cladded boxes, each having a bedroom and a bathroom within. These boxes cantilevered over the social space below, being held up by a continuous black wall, which holds various programs on the inside. Calling the project In Suspension is similar to creating a minimal house, with the idea of having more than one use. Structurally, the private spaces are suspended above. Functionally, the social space has suspended furniture for gymnastic purposes. Together, the entirety merge together effortlessly to create a minimalism that is both exciting and undeniably beautiful.


Spain-based architect Ramón Esteve designed a world-class residence with a privileged high view of the turquoise Mediterranean below; the scale of this project goes beyond 1,200 sqm, nevertheless it manages to nail a challenging combination of extravagance and minimalism impeccably. The outer façade facing the street is quite private and does not give anything away regarding its visual prerogative, a much-understated introduction to its wood-clad and geometric structure. On the opposite side lays a very modernist and playful take on various volumes, each one housing its own veranda and access to the beautiful view of the ocean. This project celebrates the natural landscape, yet the interior design brings forth symmetry defiantly. The interior design thrives in white color dominance, an effort to maintain a homogeneous feel in all rooms. Impressive how such a wide variety of materials managed to build a cohesive unit. Kudos to the excellent timberwork in the kitchen, bathroom and on the beautiful 6m high patio. With luxury comes great responsibility, and I’m pleased to see the architects did not ignore ecofriendly solutions: Two separate pools grace this residence, yet rainwater is recycled to fill each one. Lastly, the energy consumption is kept to a minimum with state-of-the-art...


Parisian architects duo Betillon/Dorval-Bory took on the renovation of a 20 sqm apartment with an unyielding minimalist grip. The white color feels fresh and does a marvelous job infusing amplitude to a narrow space, whilst not losing sight of a bold conceptual statement. It’s all about two simple light installations calling the shots. It is satisfying to behold a small apartment project with special care to lighting, considering the usual method of installing ready-made product design; this case in particular brings to the forefront tailor-made raw and naked lamps fixed on a small partition. The dividing barrier defines the living area and kitchen from the sleeping area and bathroom. For the larger area seven fluorescent tubes are tasked to light the way, with its colder blue-ish glow. In the private area in the corner, it’s up to a warmer glow to fill the space with two low-pressure sodium lamps (aka SOX), the same technology used on street lighting. The effect of the SOX lamps are unusual and daring for a residential project, since it annuls and reduces every color down to a monochromatic variation. In this case, the minimalism sensibility isn’t limited to a adornment free interior design, but to...


Shiro Studio is a London based design practice established by Andrea Morgante, committed to the creation of unique architecture and objects. Shiro means ‘white’ in Japanese, but here it implies a philosophical translation where white is perceived as the purest creative approach. An approach which has seen the design of the award winning Nivis — a strikingly sleek and minimalistic bathroom sink for Italian manufacturer Agape. Nivis pays homage to the most intimate and fragile sculptural qualities of snow, its unblemished whiteness and deep blanket fallen on everyday objects. Comprised of white cristalplant, Nivis’s surface becomes a soft, fluid mass where water can seamlessly flow, from the main to the secondary basin by rotating the overflow hole on the horizontal plane.


Milan Design Week is an interesting stage for cutting-edge innovations by newcomers, as well as a place for veterans to showcase their expectedly praise-worthy material. Although the press excitement is often directed for explicit solution-seeking projects; that would be ill-advised, because there is much to celebrate in new twists of traditional objects. Norm Architects unveils their new collaboration with Italian design brand Ex.t, stamping their usual world-class concepts and trustworthy minimalist sensibilities for a bathroom collection. It boils down to a simple metal structure, taking cues from the modernist style of the 1920’s and 30’s, the project reduces it all to very few geometric lines. The end-result is light and elegant looking, both unusual qualities for bathroom furnishings. The Stand bathtub and washbasin are impressive — they would fit perfectly as part of a Mies van der Rohe geometric house, a small and lean urban apartment or even a bucolic house in the country looking for a contemporary twist. The Felt modular wall unit plays off the eclectic potential for daily use in the bathroom, or throughout the house. Last but not least, the Hat lamp exposes the raw wood proudly. The new collection is yet another great addition to...


The small and secluded Bolton Residence is located in Eastern Quebec. Designed by the Canadian based firm Naturehumaine, this elegant home focuses on nature and simplicity. The structural form takes its shape from the traditional barns in the region, yet this vernacular is interpreted in a distinctly modern way. Two large rectangles, positioned one on top of the other, form the structure of the home. The top rectangle cantilevers slightly out from the lower, allowing the house to feel as if it is floating along the mountainside. A dark exterior distinguishes the structure from its often snowy landscape. On the interior, long and narrow windows wrap the living room, flooding the home with stunning views of its mountainous setting. The fireplace is uniquely positioned in a media cabinet, which also provides storage. Accents of wood and black create a dynamic interior, bringing depth and light to the small space. This color scheme continues in the bedroom and in the dark tile of the bathroom. Bolton Residence may be small, but it is not short on style. Photography by Adrien Williams and David Dworkind.