Minimalissimo


Search results for “Bathroom”

Famed Japanese design studio Nendo and Italian brand Bisazza Bagno gave birth to this beautiful bathroom collection. The line includes a crate-like bathtub, washstand and mirrors that resemble droplets of water, sticks in a stand for a towel drier, diagonally patterned mirrors, stackable containers for plans, rotating storage boxes and an elegant seating piece. Each element is an individual statement of minimalist creativity. Here is how designers explain their vision: Our objective for this bathroom collection was to create a strong singular impression by assembling the various elements of a bathroom suite as though they were ‘all in the bath together’. The feeling of connection that comes from a bath with someone you don’t know at a hot spring or local public bath is an important part of Japanese culture. Our bathroom collection for Bissazza expresses this feeling through its design. I love how many different ideas are unified by the homogeneous geometry of the collection. The combination of white and woodgrain is another theme that creates an aesthetic bond between the pieces.


British/Irish design collective UsTogether have treated us to the Ebb bathroom series. The white lines and glass sides form a striking, sculptural picture. All elements are made of LG HI-MACS, a natural acrylic stone material, giving the surfaces a high-quality, modern feel. One for my next house…


Milan-based architect Victor Vasilev partnered with the Italian manufacturer Boffi, to create an innovative shelving solution in blind shape. Vasilev was inspired by the profiles of buildings, touching the sky, in big cities. The breakdown of the volumes of the buildings has created a series of staggered floors which may contain seveal objects, creating a fascinating urban setting. The modular shelving system, named CTline, are blinds with inside vertical storage units, like staggered floors, varying in height and depth. The characteristic composition with its irregular profile really strikes the eye. The modular shelving units, made of a matte-white Betacryl solid surface material, can be positioned to suit specific needs. There are six different proportions to complement your home. The bathroom unit comes fitted with a mirror on inclined front side.


Situated in a small village in Portugal is the Taíde House, a renovation of an old mill into a beautiful modern home. The house was thoughtfully designed by Rue Vieira Oliveira and Vasco Manuel Fernandes. The structure is relatively small, so as not to interrupt the surrounding environment. The kitchen, living room, and office are located on the ground floor. Two bedrooms sit on the upper level, accessed by a stunning floating staircase. When looking at the structure, it is easy to determine the old and new. The rough stone base is inherited from the old mill. Everything white is assumed new. The interior, all renovated, uses limited materials: white for the walls, hardwood floors, and marble in the bathrooms. The result is a truly minimal design. Each element of Taíde House is expertly curated, creating a home that falls nothing short of perfection. Photography by Fernando Guerra FG+SG.


This set of minimal Basket Containers is one of the lastest projects developed by Nendo. The Japanese design studio has collaborated with Kanaami-Tsuji, a Kyoto-based wire netting firm that preserves the craft’s traditions and develops it for contemporary living. Nendo explains the result: The carefully constructed basket, composed of individually hand-bent wires, is supported by its frame, making a slender table useful for placing small objects, and perfect for a tight space like an entryway, bathroom or space between a sofa and the wall. The all black and white containers are available in three heights, rectangular or oval shape, with basket form or flat shape as available options. A notable detail is that the legs are more slender than the eyes of the netting, allowing the tables to be stacked and combined.


Mass Fradette Residence is a refined modern home in Greenfield Park, Canada. The home was completed in 2012 by Montreal firm Jean Verville Architects. Three interlocking volumes comprise the home’s structure. The volumes contain the garage and entrance, main living area, and upstairs bedrooms. The facade is covered in soft white wood cladding, with strategic openings for windows and outside access. The ground level features an open floor plan with long expanses of floor to ceiling windows. These windows overlook a garden, connecting the home with its surrounding natural environment. The interior is covered in a mix of matte and glossy white surfaces. Overhead lighting keeps things clean and minimal by eliminating the clutter of table and floor lamps. Polished concrete provides a modern, durable surface for the floors. This material continues on the exterior to form the back patios. Three bedrooms and bathrooms are located on the second story, accessed by a dramatic white and concrete staircase. An upstairs terrace provides a private outdoor space for sunbathing or stargazing. I’m obsessed with the unique geometry of Mass Fradette Residence. The blunt angles and crisp white surfaces are undoubtably modern, yet not without an element of playfulness.


Felipe Hess is a young architect based in Sao Paulo, Brazil. He create his own studio in 2012 with projects ranging from residential to commercial to interior design. He has been involved in many incredible projects, located in the city of Sao Paulo, all adopting minimalist design. One such project is Sergipe, a spacious and bright apartment located in a 1960 modernist building. The project involved the demolition of almost all the walls to unify the space. The private areas of the apartment, consisting of a double bedroom with bathroom, are separated by a large white wall. A rigorous and elegant apartment, simple and contemporary lines give way to the illusion in the main entrance set inside a cube building, completely covered with yellow tiles from floor to ceiling. To create a seamless tile surface, Hess decided not to include handle in the design. Instead, the door opens by entering a PIN on a keypad hidden behind one of the tiles. The cube entrance is covered with shelves from the outside, and it creates the illusion, once inside, exiting from a magic door through the library. Fantastic.


Home 11 is an elegant dwelling in Amsterdam. The structure was previously a large garage. i29 Interior Architects renovated the garage into a modern apartment for two people. The color palette is defined by three materials: white sheetrock, natural oak, and gleaming black surfaces. The elevated kitchen is composed of wooden cabinets and a black island. Step down into the living room and you’ll find an oak wall with black shelving and a small fireplace. The doors to the bedroom and bathroom blend with the wood-clad walls. Skylights run across the ceiling and provide a plethora of natural light. To connect the home with the outdoors, i29 Interior Architects included a small outdoor patio and designed the living room carpet in a green mossy pattern. Home 11 is an incredibly posh dwelling. The materials and furnishings combine to give the home a luxury feel. The skylights are a wonderful addition. Never underestimate the power of simple materials, natural light, and great design. Photography by Ewout Huibers.


Belgium based studio Five AM completed the interior of the new bedroom suite at a house in Bellegem, west Belgium, initially designed by studio Arch-id. The space was transformed by lifting the attic roof, which allowed to locate a bathroom isle inside the big open room. Arch-id explain the design: As the owner wanted an open and airy feeling, we designed a monolithic white box that doesn’t reach the ceiling. The height delivers the privacy when needed, but makes it still possible to interact with each other. The entire bathroom was produced in ‘solid surface’, which ensures seamless surfaces. The sidewall can unfold which makes interaction between sleeping and bathing possible. I love the delicate staircase leading to the bedroom and the sense of secluded space inside the all-white bathroom cube. The low bench that wraps around the room conceals ample storage, a nice touch, contributing to the clean and uncluttered state of the space. Photography by Thomas De Bruyne/Cafeine


This florist’s home in Japan’s Mie prefecture was designed to inspire the resident’s craft. The dwelling was completed by Japanese firm Shinichi Ogawa & Associates in May of this year. Florist Studio utilizes a refreshing simple design to offer seamless views for a creative live/work space. The most stunning feature of the home is the glass walls that span the entire length of the building. The glass is held in place by the floor and roof slabs; this structure eliminates the need for view-impeding columns. The long stretch of windows is reminiscent of a painting in a gallery. The gallery aesthetic continues throughout the home. A cantilevered counter runs the full length of the structure, forming a bed headboard and bathroom vanity on one end, and an office desk on the other. Carefully chosen furniture is placed in the other rooms. The attention paid to each detail makes the whole home feel like a work of art. Florist Studio a perfect dwelling for its resident and its environment.


Shirahama Roh Pinggu is a small seaside home designed by Okuwada Architects Office. Located in Wakayama, Japan, this single story home is structured to work with the island landscape. The sand and sea are on the southern side of the home, while mountains surround the other three sides. The southern wall of windows embraces the sea views. The kitchen and living room are situated in this part of the home. The mountain facing rooms contain more private areas, such as the bedrooms and bathrooms. Wooden floors connect the home with the forest behind it. A white and glass facade, and a galvanized steel roof, complete the home’s light and airy aesthetic. I love the simple design of this resort home. The soft colors and low lying structure minimize the visual impact the home has on the environment. The simple interior allows the residents to direct their focus out towards the landscape. Overall, Shirahama Roh Pinggu is a lovely vacation dwelling for a family. Photography by Tada Yuko / Yuko Tada Photography.


Fade is a collection of vessels and furniture for the bathroom, created by Stockholm based designers John Astbury and Kyuhyung Cho. It consists of 13 pieces: a low ash table, ash and copper mirror, and a collection of ceramic trays and vessels in parian clay. Designers explain: Beginning with a period of research on the subject of bathing we began to view it as both ritual and a metaphor for the work. To see ritual and water as both a transforming element and a moment of reflection. This is the foundation for the collection. The aim was the representation of the invisible, of transformation within the objects.  I like the geometry within the objects, the subtle contrast between relaxed and constricted shapes in each volume. Designers say, that the shifting tones of the collection represent the view on bathing as a ceremony and nature as a transformative element. Photography by Stephanie Wiegner